Effective Teaching Practices Bibliography

The following references organized by topic and shared by ACUE are provided here for further reading on these teaching topics.

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Leading the First Day of Class

Angelo, T. A., & Cross, K. P. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers (2nd ed.)San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Bawa, P. (2016). Retention in Online Courses: Exploring Issues and Solutions—A Literature Review. SAGE Open, 6(1), 1-11.

Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R.-M. (2016). The online teaching survival guide: Simple and practical pedagogical tips (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CAJossey-Bass. 

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Conrad, R.-M., & Donaldson, J. A. (2011). Engaging the online learner: Activities and resources for creative instruction. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Foster, D. A., & Hermann, A. D. (2011). Linking the first week of class to end-of-term satisfaction: Using a reciprocal interview activity to create an active and comfortable classroom. College Teaching, 59, 111–116.

Howard, J. R. (2015). Discussion in the college classroom: Getting your students engaged and participating in person and online. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Kubacki, R., Lyon, A., Valent, J., & Wallace, S. (2017). Tips to give your students to succeed in online learning. Retrieved from https://www.duq.edu/about/centers-and-institutes/center-for-teaching-excellence/teaching-and-learning/tips-for-student-online-success

Lang, J. M. (2008). On course: A week-by-week guide to your first semester of college teaching. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Laws, E. L., Apperson, J. M., Buchert, S., & Bregman, N. J. (2010). Student evaluations of instruction: When are enduring first impressions formed? North American Journal of Psychology, 12, 81–92.

McKeachie, W. J., & Hofer, B. K. (2002). McKeachie’s teaching tips: Strategies, research, and theory for college and university teachers (11th ed.). Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Stavredes, T. (2011). Effective online teaching : foundations and strategies for student success. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Wieman, C. (2014). First day of class – recommendations for instructors. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: https://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/First_Day_of_Class.pdf

Wilson, J. H., & Wilson, S. B. (2007). The first day of class affects student motivation: An experimental study. Teaching of Psychology, 34, 226–230.

Promoting a Civil Learning Environment

Alberts, H. C., Hazen, H. D., & Theobald, R. B. (2010). Classroom incivilities: The challenge of interactions between college students and instructors in the US. Journal of Geography in Higher Education, 34, 439–462.

Amada, G. (1992). Coping with the disruptive college student: A practical model. Journal of American College Health, 40(5), 203–215.

Appleby, D. (1990). Faculty and student perceptions of irritating behaviors in the college classroom. Journal of Staff, Program, and Organization Development, 8, 41–46.

Bayer, A. E. (2004). Promulgating statements of student rights and responsibilities. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 2004(99), 77–87.

Black, L. J., Wygonik, M. L., & Frey, B. A. (2011). Faculty-preferred strategies to promote a positive classroom environment. Journal on Excellence in College Teaching, 22(2), 109–134.

Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R.-M. (2016). The online teaching survival guide: Simple and practical pedagogical tips. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Boice, R. (1998). Classroom incivilities. In K. A. Feldman & M. B. Paulson (Eds.), Teaching and learning in the college classroom (2nd ed., pp. 347–369). Needham Heights, MA: Simon & Schuster.

Braxton, J. M., Bayer, A. E., and Noseworthy, J. A. (2004). The influence of teaching norm violations on the welfare of students as clients of college teaching. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 2004(99), 41–46.

Buttner, E. H. (2004). How do we “dis” students?: A model of (dis)respectful business instructor behavior. Journal of Management Education, 28, 319–334.

Canter, L. (2009). Assertive discipline: Positive behavior management for today’s classroom (4th ed.). Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree Press.

Carbone, E. (1999). Students behaving badly in large classes. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 1999 (77), 35–43.

Carnegie Mellon University, Eberly Center. (n.d.). Address problematic student behavior. Retrieved from https://www.cmu.edu/teaching/designteach/teach/problemstudent.html

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Davis. B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Deering, C.  (2011). Managing disruptive behaviour in the classroom. College Quarterly, 14(3).

DiClementi, J. D., & Handelsman, M. M. (2005). Empowering students: Class-generated course rules. Teaching of Psychology, 32, 18–21.

Galbraith, M.W., & Jones, M.S. (2010). Understanding incivility in online teaching. Journal of Adult Education, 39(2), 1–10.

Knepp, K. A. F. (2012). Understanding student and faculty incivility in higher education. The Journal of Effective Teaching, 12(1), 32–45.

Kyle, P. B., & Rogien, L. R. (2004). Opportunities and options in classroom management. Boston, MA: Pearson.

Nilson, L. B., & Goodson, L. A. (2018). Online teaching at its best: Merging instructional design with teaching and learning research. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Nilson, L. B. (in press). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (4th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Nilson, L. B., & Jackson, N. S. (2004). Combating classroom misconduct (incivility) with bills of rights. Proceedings of the 4th Conference of the International Consortium for Educational Development. Ottawa, ON, Canada. 

Paff, L. (2015, September 28). Why policies fail to promote better learning decisions. Faculty Focus. Retrieved from https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/effective-classroom-management/why-policies-fail-to-promote-better-learning-decisions/

Palloff, R. M., & Pratt, K. (2007). Building online learning communities: Effective strategies for the virtual classroom (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Sorcinelli, M. D. (1994). Dealing with troublesome behaviors in the classroom. In K. W. Prichard & R. M. Sawyer (Eds.), Handbook of college teaching: Theory and applications (pp. 365–373). Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Stavredes, T. (2011). Effective online teaching : foundations and strategies for student success. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Wilson, G. L. (2005). Groups in context: Leadership and participation in small groups (7th ed.). Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill.

Engaging Underprepared Students

Bailey, T. L., & Brown, A. (2016). Online student services: Current practices and recommendations for implementation. Journal of Educational Technology Systems, 44, 450–462.

Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R.-M. (2016). The online teaching survival guide: Simple and practical pedagogical tips. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Brookfield, S. D. (2015). The skillful teacher: On technique, trust, and responsiveness in the classroom (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Cost, P. (2012). Building relationships in online classes by incorporating letter writing, buddy systems, and teaching and utilizing proper netiquette. National Social Science Journal, 38(2), 16–19.

Espitia Cruz, M. I., & Kwinta, A. (2013). "Buddy system": A pedagogical innovation to promote online interaction. PROFILE: Issues in Teachers' Professional Development, 15, 207–221.

Gabriel, K. F. (2008). Teaching unprepared students: Strategies for promoting success and retention in higher education. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Jaggars, S. S. (2011). Online learning: Does it help low-income and underprepared students? (CCRC Working Paper No. 26). Retrieved from https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED515135

McGuire, S. Y. (with McGuire, S.). (2015). Teach students how to learn: Strategies you can incorporate into any course to improve student metacognition, study skills, and motivation. Sterling, VA: Stylus. 

Palloff, R. M., & Pratt, K. (2008). Assessing the online learner: Resources and strategies for faculty. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Roper, A. R. (2007). How students develop online learning skills. EDUCAUSE Quarterly, 30(1), 62–65.

Twigg, C. A. (2003). Improving learning and reducing costs: New models for online learning. EDUCAUSE Review, 38(5), 28–38.

Twigg, C. A. (2015, November–December). Improving learning and reducing costs: Fifteen years of course description. Change, 47(6). Retrieved from https://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20Issues/2015/November-December%202015/course-redesign_full.html

Walpole, M. (2007). Economically and educationally challenged students in higher education: Access to outcomes (ASHE Higher Education Report, Vol. 33, No. 3). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Helping Students Persist in Their Studies

Allen, D. (2015). Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Penguin Books.

Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R.-M. (2016). The online teaching survival Guide: Simple and practical pedagogical tips (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Bowles Therriault, S. & Krivoshey, A. (2014, August). College Persistence Indicators Research Review. https://www.air.org/sites/default/files/downloads/report/College-Persistence-Indicators-August-2014.pdf

Braxton, J. M. (Ed.). (2008). The role of the classroom in college student persistence. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Conrad, R.-M., & Donaldson, J. A. (2011). Engaging the online learner: Activities and resources for creative instruction. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Cornell University, Center for Teaching Innovation. (n.d.). Using rubrics. Retrieved from https://teaching.cornell.edu/teaching-resources/assessment-evaluation/using-rubrics

Crisp, G., Taggart, A., & Nora, A. (2015). Undergraduate latina/o students: A systematic review of research identifying factors contributing to academic success outcomes. Review of Educational Research, 85(2), 249-274. https://doi.org/10.3102/0034654314551064

Crissman Ishler, J. L., & Upcraft, M. L. (2005). The keys to first-year student persistence. In M. L. Upcraft, J. N. Gardner, & B. O. Barefoot (Eds.), Challenging and supporting the first-year student: A handbook for improving the first year of college (pp. 27–46). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Dweck, C. S. (2006). Mindset: The new psychology of success. How we can learn to fulfill our potential. New York, NY: Random House.

Ferreira, M., Cardoso, A. P., & Abrantes, J. L. (2011). Motivation and relationship of the student with the school as factors involved in the perceived learning. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 29, 1707–1714.

Friedman, J. (2017, April 4). The average online bachelor’s student. Retrieved from https://www.usnews.com/higher-education/online-education/articles/2017-04-04/us-news-data-the-average-online-bachelors-student

Gentry, R. (2014). Sustaining college students' persistence and achievement through exemplary instructional strategies. Research in Higher Education Journal, 24, https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1064117

Hart, C. (2012). Factors associated with student persistence in an online program of study: A review of the literature. Journal of Interactive Online Learning, 11, 19-42.

Hattie, J., & Timperley, H. (2007). The power of feedback. Review of Educational Research, 77, 81-112. 

Legg, K., Cofino, A., & Sanlo, R. (2020). Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender college students: Revisiting retention. Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory & Practice, 21(4), 417-430. https://doi.org/10.1177/1521025119895513

Morrow, J., & Ackermann, M. (2012). Intention to persist and retention of first-year students: The importance of motivation and sense of belonging. College Student Journal, 46(3), 483-491.

Nilson, L. B., & Goodson, L. A. (2018). Online teaching at its best: Merging instructional design with teaching and learning research. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Pink, D. H. (2009). Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us. New York, NY: Riverhead Books.

Ruffalo Noel Levitz (2016). 2015-16 National online learners’ satisfaction and priorities report. Cedar Rapids, IA: Ruffalo Noel Levitz.

Ryan, R. M., & Deci, E. L. (2009). Promoting self-determined school engagement: Motivation, learning, and well-being. In K. R. Wenzel & A. Wigfield (Eds.), Educational psychology handbook series. Handbook of motivation at school (pp. 171-195). New York, NY: Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group.

Stavredes, T. (2011). Effective online teaching: Foundations and strategies for student success. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Thompson, J. G. (2011, March 26). 28 ways to build persistent & confident students. Retrieved from https://juliagthompson.blogspot.com/2011/03/how-to-build-persistence-and-confidence.html

Tinto, V. (1993). Leaving college: Rethinking the causes and cures of student attrition (2nd ed.). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

University of Michigan, Center for Research on Learning & Teaching [CRLTeach]. (2014, February 26). Eric Mazur, Harvard University. Peer instruction [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UJRNRdgyvE 

Walvoord, B. E. F., & Anderson, V. J. (2010). Effective grading: A tool for learning and assessment in collete (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Wieman, C. (2010). Basic instructor habits to keep students engaged. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/Files/InstructorHabitsToKeepStudentsEngaged_CWSEI.pdf

Wieman, C. (2013). Motivating learning. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/Motivating-Learning_CWSEI.pdf

Embracing Diversity in Your Classroom

Banaji, M. R., & Greenwald, A. G. (2013). Blindspot: Hidden biases of good people. New York, NY: Delacorte Press.

Brookfield, S. D. (2015). The skillful teacher: On technique, trust, and responsiveness in the classroom (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Brookfield, S. D. (n.d.). Discussion as a way of teaching: Workshop resource packet. Retrieved from https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5738a0ccd51cd47f81977fe8/t/5750ef4862cd947608165d85/1464921939855/Discussion_as_a_Way_of_Teaching_Packet.pdf

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Dee, T., John, J., Baker, R., & Evans, B. (2018). Bias in online classes: Evidence from a Field Experiment. (CEPA Working Paper No. 18–03) (p. 46). Stanford, CA: Stanford Center for Educational Policy Analysis. Retrieved from https://cepa.stanford.edu/content/bias-online-classes-evidence-field-experiment

Holoien, D. S., & Shelton, J. N. (2012). You deplete me: The cognitive costs of colorblindness on ethnic minorities. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48, 562–565.

Kim, Y. M. (2011). Minorities in higher education: Twenty-fourth status report 2011 supplement. Washington, DC: American Council on Education.

Mayhew, M. J., Grunwald, H. E., & Dey, E. L. (2011). Curriculum matters: Creating a positive climate for diversity from the student perspective. In S. R. Harper & S. Hurtado (Eds.), Racial and ethnic diversity in higher education (3rd ed., pp. 515–529). Boston, MA: Pearson Learning Solutions.

Moss-Racusin, C. A., Dovidio, J. F., Brescoll, V. L., Graham, M. J., & Handelsman, J. (2012). Science faculty’s subtle gender biases favor male students. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 109(41), 16474–16479.

Nelson Laird, T. F. (2014). Reconsidering the inclusion of diversity in the curriculum. Diversity and Democracy, 17(4), 12–14.

Nilson, L. B., & Goodson, L. A. (2018). Online teaching at its best: Merging instructional design with teaching and learning research. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Reeves, A. (2015). Colored by race: Bias in the evaluation of candidates of color by law firm hiring committees (p. 15). Chicago: Nextions. Retrieved from https://nextions.com/portfolio-posts/colored-by-race-yellow-paper-series/

Solórzano, D., Ceja, M., & Yosso, T. (2011). Critical race theory, racial microaggressions, and campus racial climate: The experiences of African American college students. In S. R. Harper & S. Hurtado (Eds.), Racial and ethnic diversity in higher education (3rd ed., pp. 438–456). Boston, MA: Pearson Learning Solutions.

Stavredes, T. (2011). Effective online teaching: foundations and strategies for student success. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Steele, C. M. (1999, August). Thin ice: Stereotype threat and black college students. The Atlantic. Retrieved from https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1999/08/thin-ice-stereotype-threat-and-black-college-students/304663/

Steele, C. M. (2013, April 18). Stereotype threat: How it affects us and what we can do about it [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.cornell.edu/video/claude-steele-explains-impact-of-stereotype-threat-on-achievement

Steele, C. M., & Aronson, J. (1995). Stereotype threat and the intellectual test performance of African Americans. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 69, 797811.

Stroessner, S., & Good, C. (n.d.). What can be done to reduce stereotype threat? Retrieved from https://www.reducingstereotypethreat.org

Sue, D. W. (2010, October 5). Racial microaggressions in everyday life: Is subtle bias harmless? [Blog post]. Psychology Today. Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/microaggressions-in-everyday-life/201010/racial-microaggressions-in-everyday-life

Tapia, R., & Johnson, C. (2011). Minority students in science and math: What universities still do not understand about race in America. In S. R. Harper & S. Hurtado (Eds.), Racial and ethnic diversity in higher education (3rd ed., pp. 484–491). Boston, MA: Pearson Learning Solutions.

Tatum, B. D. (2011). Talking about race, learning about racism: The application of racial identity development theory in the classroom. In S. R. Harper & S. Hurtado (Eds.), Racial and ethnic diversity in higher education (3rd ed., pp. 438–456). Boston, MA: Pearson Learning Solutions.

University of Michigan, Center for Research on Learning & Teaching [CRLTeach]. (2014, February 26). Eric Mazur, Harvard University. Peer instruction [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UJRNRdgyvE

U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (2015). Fast facts: Students with disabilities. Retrieved from https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d13/ch_3.asp

Warren, L. (n.d). Managing hot moments in the classroom. Retrieved from https://diversity.humboldt.edu/sites/default/files/managing_hot_moments_in_the_classroom-harvard_university.pdf

Checking for Student Understanding

Angelo, T. A., & Cross, K. P. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Barkley, E. F., & Major, C. H. (2016). Learning assessment techniques: A handbook for college faculty. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Black, P. (2003). The nature and value of formative assessment for learning. Improving Schools, 6(3), 7–22.

Black, P., & Wiliam, D. (1998). Assessment and classroom learning. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practice, 5, 7–74.

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Dailey, R. (2014, April 21). The sound of silence: The value of quiet contemplation in the classroom. Faculty Focus. Retrieved from https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-and-learning/sound-silence-value-quiet-contemplation-classroom/

Dallimore, E. J., Hertenstein, J. H., & Platt, M. B. (2013). Impact of cold-calling on student voluntary participation. Journal of Management Education, 37, 305–341.

Deslauriers, L., Schelew, E., & Wieman, C. (2011). Improved learning in a large-enrollment physics class. Science, 332, 862–864.

Earl, L. M. (2012). Assessment as learning: Using classroom assessment to maximize student learning. <2nd ed.). Thousand Parks, CA: Corwin Press.

Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2007). Checking for understanding: Formative assessment techniques for your classroom. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Frese, M., & Keith, N. (2015). Action errors, error management, and learning in organizations. Annual Review of Psychology, 66, 661–687.

Fusco, E. (2012). Effective questioning strategies in the classroom: A step-by-step approach to engaged thinking and learning, K8. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

Handelsman, M. M. (2013, November 26). The case of classroom cold calling: What do you think? [Blog]. Psychology Today. Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-ethical-professor/201311/the-case-classroom-cold-calling-what-do-you-think

Howard, J. R. (2015). Discussion in the college classroom: Getting your students engaged and participating in person and online. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Ingram, J., & Elliott, V. (2016). A critical analysis of the role of wait time in classroom interactions and the effects on student and teacher interactional behaviours. Cambridge Journal of Education, 46, 1–17.

Knight, J. (2013). High-impact instruction: A framework for great teaching. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Krause, S. J., Baker, D. R., Carberry, A. R., Koretsky, M., Brooks, B. J., Gilbuena, D., . . . Ankeny, C. J. (2013, June). Muddiest point formative feedback in core materials classes with YouTube, Blackboard, class warm-ups and word clouds. Paper presented at the 120th American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition, Atlanta, GA. Retrieved from https://www.asee.org/public/conferences/20/papers/7130/view

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Popham, W. J. (2008). Transformative assessment. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Purcell, B. M. (2014). Use of formative classroom assessment techniques in a project management course. Journal of Case Studies in Accreditation and Assessment, 3, 1–6.

Ruiz-Primo, M. A. (2011). Informal formative assessment: The role of instructional dialogues in assessing students’ learning. Studies in Educational Evaluation, 37, 15–24.

Slavin, R. E. (Ed.). Proven programs in education: Classroom management & assessment. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Tofade, T., Elsner, J., & Haines, S. T. (2013). Best practice strategies for effective use of questions as a teaching tool. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 77(7).

Tang, T. (2013, October). A study of the qualitative aspect of the one-minute paper. Paper presented at the TARC International Conference on Learning and Teaching, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Walker, D.-M. (2012). Classroom assessment techniques: An assessment and student evaluation method. Creative Education, 3, 903–907.

Wieman, C. (2010). Basic instructor habits to keep students engaged. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/Files/InstructorHabitsToKeepStudentsEngaged_CWSEI.pdf

Wieman, C. (2016). Observation guide for active-learning classroom. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: https://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/Active-learning-class-observation-guide_Wieman.pdf

Wiliam, D., & Leahy, S. (2007). A theoretical foundation for formative assessment. In J. H. McMillan (Ed.), Formative classroom assessment: Theory into practice (pp. 29–42). New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

Yorke, M. (2003). Formative assessment in higher education: Moves towards theory and the enhancement of pedagogic practice. Higher Education, 45, 477–501.

Providing Useful Feedback

Angelo, T. A., & Cross, K. P. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Angelo, T. (2011). Efficient feedback for effective learning: How less can sometimes be more. Retrieved from https://planning.iupui.edu/assessment/institute-files/2011-institute/monday-2011/angelo-feedback.pdf

Barnes, M. (2012, December 18). De-grade your classroom and instead use narrative feedback [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://smartblogs.com/education/2012/12/18/de-grade-your-classroom-narrative-feedback-mark-barnes/

Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R.-M. (2016). The online teaching survival guide: Simple and practical pedagogical tips. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Burnham, C. C. (1986). Portfolio evaluation: Room to breathe and grow. In C. W. Bridges (Ed.), Training the new teacher of college composition (pp. 125–138). Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English.

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Columbia University Graduate School of Arts & Sciences Teaching Center. (n.d.). How to provide constructive feedback—That won’t exasperate your students. Retrieved from https://www.columbia.edu/cu/tat/pdfs/feedback.pdf

Dean, C. B., Hubbell, E. R., Pitler, H., & Stone, B. J. (2012). Classroom instruction that works: Research-Based strategies for increasing student achievement (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Deslauriers, L., Schelew, E., & Wieman, C. (2011). Improved learning in a large-enrollment physics class. Science, 332, 862–864.

Dougherty, J. (2013, October 1). How to organize peer review on Google Docs. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwMQ2zDLrfk

Friend, C. (2013, January 1). Grading, assessment, or feedback? [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://chrisfriend.us/grading-assessment-or-feedback/

Goodwin, B., & Miller, K. (2012). Research says / Good feedback is targeted, specific, timely. Educational Leadership, 70(1), 82–83.

The Higher Education Academy. (2012, July). 10 ideas for enhancing feedback with technology. Retrieved from https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/system/files/resources/10_ideas_for_enhancing_feedback_with_technology.pdf

Kim, K.-S., & Moore, J. (2005). Web–based learning: Factors affecting students’ satisfaction and learning experience. First Monday, 10(11). https://doi.org/10.5210/fm.v10i11.1294

LeVan, K. S., & King, M. E. (2016, November 14). Teaching students how to manage feedback. Faculty Focus. Retrieved from https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-and-learning/teaching-students-manage-feedback/

McKeachie, W. J., & Svinicki, M. (2006). McKeachie’s teaching tips: Strategies, research, and theory for college and university teachers (12th ed.). Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Stenger, M. (2014, August 6). 5 research-based tips for providing students with meaningful feedback. Retrieved from https://www.edutopia.org/blog/tips-providing-students-meaningful-feedback-marianne-stenger

Sweetland Center for Writing, University of Michigan. (n.d.). Using peer review to improve student writing. Retrieved from https://lsa.umich.edu/sweetland/instructors/teaching-resources/using-peer-review-to-improve-student-writing.html

Trimingham, R., & Simmons, P. (2009). Using audio technology for student feedback. Retrieved from https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/system/files/using-audio-technology-student-feedback.pdf

Turner, W., & West, J. (2013). Assessment for “Digital First Language” speakers: Online video assessment and feedback in higher education. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 23, 288–296.

Twigg, C. A. (2015, November–December). Improving learning and reducing costs: Fifteen years of course description. Change. Retrieved from http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20Issues/2015/November-December%202015/course-redesign_full.html

Wessling, S. B. (n.d.). Podcasting to personalize feedback. Retrieved from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/student-feedback-through-technology

Wiggins, G. (2012). Seven keys to effective feedback. Educational Leadership, 70(1), 10–16.

Developing Effective Class Sessions and Lectures

Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Bligh, D. A. (2000). What’s the use of lectures? San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R.-M. (2016). The online teaching survival guide: Simple and practical pedagogical tips (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Borton, T. (1970). Reach, touch, and teach: Student concerns and process education. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Brookfield, S. D. (2015). The skillful teacher: On technique, trust, and responsiveness in the classroom (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Davis, B. G. (1993). Tools for teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Fuchs, A. H. (1997). Ebbinghaus’s contributions to psychology after 1885. American Journal of Psychology, 110, 621–634.

Gazzaniga, M. S., Ivry, R. B., & Mangun, G. R. (2002). Cognitive neuroscience: The biology of the mind (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Norton.

Lambert, C. (2012, March–April). Twilight of the lecture: The trend toward “active learning” may overthrow the style of teaching that has ruled universities for 600 years. Harvard Magazine. Retrieved from https://harvardmagazine.com/2012/03/twilight-of-the-lecture

Lang, J. M. (2008). On course: A week-by-week guide to your first semester of college teaching. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Lang, J. M. (2016, January 25). Small changes in teaching: The first 5 minutes of class. Vitae. Retrieved from https://chroniclevitae.com/news/1264-small-changes-in-teaching-the-first-5-minutes-of-class

Medina, J. (2014). Brain rules: 12 principles for surviving and thriving at work, home, and school (2nd ed.). Seattle, WA: Pear Press.

Moore, M. G. (2013). Handbook of distance education. New York: Routledge.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Nilson, L. B., & Goodson, L. A. (2018). Online teaching at its best: Merging instructional design with teaching and learning research. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Scagnoli, N. (2012, November 1). 7 things you should know about microlectures. ELI 7 Things You Should Know. Retrieved from https://library.educause.edu/resources/2012/11/7-things-you-should-know-about-microlectures

Sousa, D. A. (2011). How the brain learns (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

Tollefson, S. (n.d). Gone in sixty seconds: The one-minute paper as a tool for evaluation—of both instructor and students [Blog post]. Download a PDF of this blog post.

Twigg, C. A. (2015, November–December). Improving learning and reducing costs: Fifteen years of course description. Change. Retrieved from https://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20Issues/2015/November-December%202015/course-redesign_full.html

University of Michigan, Center for Research on Learning & Teaching [CRLTeach]. (2014, February 26). Eric Mazur, Harvard University. Peer instruction [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UJRNRdgyvE

Wieman, C. (2010). Basic instructor habits to keep students engaged. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: https://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/Files/InstructorHabitsToKeepStudentsEngaged_CWSEI.pdf

Wieman, C. (2016). Observation guide for active-learning classroom. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: https://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/Active-learning-class-observation-guide_Wieman.pdf

Teaching Powerful Note-Taking Skills

Bligh, D. A. (2000). What’s the use of lectures? San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Boye, A. (2012). Note-taking in the 21st century: Tips for instructors and students. Retrieved from https://www.depts.ttu.edu/tlpdc/Resources/Teaching_resources/TLPDC_teaching_resources/Documents/NotetakingWhitepaper.pdf

Broderick, B. (1990). Groundwork for college reading. West Berlin, NJ: Townsend Press.

Carrier, C. A. (1983). Notetaking research implications for the classroom. Journal of Instructional Development, 6(3), 19–26.

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Cohen, D., Kim, E., Tan, J., & Winkelmes, M. (2013). A note-restructuring intervention increases students’ exam scores. College Teaching, 61, 95–99.

Cottrell, S. (2008). Palgrave study skills: The study skills handbook (3rd ed.). Basingstoke, UK: Macmillan.

DeZure, D., Kaplan, M., & Deerman, M. A. (2001). Research on student notetaking: Implications for faculty and graduate student instructors. Retrieved from https://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/~krasny/math156_crlt.pdf

Heward, W. L. (n.d.). Guided notes: Improving the effectiveness of your lectures.  Retrieved from http://ada.osu.edu/resources/fastfacts/Guided_Notes.htm (link no longer active)

Huxham, M. (2010). The medium makes the message: Effects of cues on students’ lecture notes. Active Learning in Higher Education, 11, 179–188.

Intervention Central. (n.d.). Guided notes: Increasing student engagement during lecture and assigned readings. Retrieved from https://www.interventioncentral.org/academic-interventions/study-organization/guided-notes-increasing-student-engagement-during-lecture-

Johnston, A. H., & Su, W. Y. (1994). Lectures—A learning experience? Education in Chemistry, 35, 76–79.

Kauffman, D. F., Zhao, R., & Yang, Y.-S. (2011). Effects of online note taking formats and self-monitoring prompts on learning from online text: Using technology to enhance self-regulated learning. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 36, 313–322.

Kiewra, K. A. (1985). Providing the instructor’s notes: An effective addition to student notetaking. Educational Psychologist, 20, 33–39.

Kiewra, K. A. (2005). Learn how to study and SOAR to success. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Prentice Hall.

Kiewra, K. A., DuBois, N., Christian, D., McShane, A., Meyerhoffer, M., & Roskelley, D. (1991). Note-taking functions and techniques. Journal of Educational Psychology, 83, 240–245.

Langan, J. (2007). Reading and student skills (8th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Longman, D. G., & Atkinson, R. H. (1999). College learning and study skills. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. 

Marsh, E. J., & Sink, H. E. (2010). Access to handouts of presentation slides during lecture: Consequences for learning. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 24, 691–706.

McKeachie, W. J. (1994). McKeachie’s teaching tips: Strategies, research, and theory for college and university teachers (9th ed.). Lexington, MA: D. C. Heath.

Medina, J. (2014). Brain rules: 12 Principles for surviving and thriving at work, home and school. Seattle, WA: Pear Press.

Mueller, P. A., & Oppenheimer, D. M. (2014). The pen is mightier than the keyboard: Advantages of longhand over laptop note taking. Psychological Science, 25, 1159–1168.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Peper, R. J., & Mayer, R. E. (1978). Note-taking as a generative activity. Journal of Educational Psychology, 70, 514–522.

Potts, B. (1993). Improving the quality of student notes. Practical Assessment, Research, and Evaluation, 3(8).

Rotenberg, R. L. (2010). The art & craft of college teaching: A guide for new professors & graduate students (2nd ed.). Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press.

Stefanou, C., Hoffman, L., & Vielee, N. (2008). Note-taking in the college classroom as evidence of generative learning. Learning Environments Research, 11, 1–17.

Stutts, K. J., Beverly, M. M., & Kelley, S. F. (2013). Evaluation of note taking method on academic performance in undergraduate animal science courses. NACTA Journal, 57(3), 38–39.

University of Nebraska. (n.d.). Teaching students to take better notes: Notes on notetaking. Retrieved from https://www.unl.edu/gradstudies/current/teaching/notetaking

Using Groups to Ensure Active Learning

Allen, D., & Tanner, K. (2005). Infusing active learning into the large-enrollment biology class: Seven strategies, from the simple to complex. Cell Biology Education, 4, 262–268.

Angelo, T. A., & Cross, K. P. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Barrows, H. S., & Tamblyn, R. M. (1980). Problem-based learning: An approach to medical education. New York, NY: Springer.

Benton, S., & Pallett, W. (2013, January 29). Essay on importance of class size in higher education. Retrieved April 11, 2018, from https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2013/01/29/essay-importance-class-size-higher-education

Brookfield, S. D., & Preskill, S. (2005). Discussion as a way of teaching: Tools and techniques for democratic classrooms (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Brown, R. E. (2001). The process of community-building in distance learning classes. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 5(2), 18 - 35.

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Cleveland, L. G. (2002). That’s not a large class; It’s a small town: How do I manage? In C. A. Stanley & M. E. Porter (Eds.), Engaging large classes: Strategies and techniques for college faculty (pp. 16–27). Bolton, MA: Anker.

Columbia University. (n.d.) Active learning. Retrieved from https://www.columbia.edu/cu/tat/pdfs/active%20learning.pdf

Cornell University, Center for Teaching Innovation. (n.d.). Active learning. Retrieved from https://teaching.cornell.edu/teaching-resources/engaging-students/active-learning

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Derek Bok Center. (2014). ABLConnect: Doris Sommer on Active Learning in the Humanities. Retrieved from https://vimeo.com/110146845

Deslauriers, L., Schelew, E., & Wieman, C. (2011). Improved learning in a large-enrollment physics class. Science, 332, 862–864.

Doyle, T. (2008). Helping students learn in a learner-centered environment: A guide to facilitating learning in higher education. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Faust, J. L., & Paulson, D. R. (1998). Active learning in the college classroom. Journal on Excellence in College Teaching, 9(2), 3–24.

Felder, R. M. (1997). Beating the numbers game: Effective teaching in large classes. Proceedings of the 1997 ASEE Annual Conference, Milwaukee, WI. Retrieved from: https://www4.ncsu.edu/unity/lockers/users/f/felder/public/Papers/Largeclasses.htm

Gross Davis, B. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Hake, R. R. (1998). Interactive-Engagement vs. traditional methods: A six-thousand-student survey of mechanics test data for introductory physics courses. American Journal of Physics, 66, 64.

Herbert, D., & Hannam, R. (2002). A survey of large class teaching around Australia. AUTC Project Teaching Large Classes. Teaching and Educational Development Institute.

Huba M. E., & Freed, J. E. (2000). Learner-Centered assessment on college campuses: Shifting the focus from teaching to learning. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

Knight, J. K., & Wood, W. B. (2005). Teaching more by lecturing less. Cell Biology Education, 4, 298–310.

Lambert, C. (2012, March–April). Twilight of the lecture: The trend toward “active learning” may overthrow the style of teaching that has ruled universities for 600 years. Harvard Magazine. Retrieved from https://harvardmagazine.com/2012/03/twilight-of-the-lecture

Lawson Remler, N. (2002). The more active the better: Engaging College English students with active learning strategies. Teaching English in the Two Year College, 30, 7681.

McKeachie, W. J. (1999). McKeachie’s teaching tips: Strategies, research, and theory for college and university teachers (10th ed.). Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.

Medina, J. (2014). Brain rules: 12 principles for surviving and thriving at work, home, and school (updated and expanded 2nd ed.). Seattle, WA: Pear Press.

Moore, M. G. (2012). Handbook of distance education. (3rd ed.). New York: Routledge.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

North Dakota State University. (n.d.). Active learning activities. Retrieved from https://ndsu.edu/ahss/faculty_resources/teaching_and_learning_resources/active_learning_activities/

Novicki, A. (2010, April 1). Promoting learning in large enrollment courses [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://cit.duke.edu/blog/2010/04/promoting-learning-in-large-enrollment-courses/

Orellana, A. (2006). Class size and interaction in online courses. The Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 7(3), 229–248.

Pollard, J. (2014, June 9). Teaching students how to think. University of Arizona News. Retrieved from https://uanews.org/videos/teaching-students-how-think

PolyUFB. (2013, February 20). Dr. Allison Lloyd – Active learning in large class [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_zlpj89AFg

Preszler, R. W., Dawe, A., Shuster, C. B., & Shuster, M. (2007). Assessment of the effects of student response systems on student learning and attitudes over a broad range of biology courses. CBE Life Sciences Education, 6, 29–41.

Prince, M. (2004). Does active learning work? A review of the research. Journal of Engineering Education, 93, 223–231.

Ruhl, K. L., Hughes, C. A., & Schloss, P. J. (1987). Using the pause procedure to enhance lecture recall. Teacher Education and Special Education, 10, 14–18.

Silberman, M. (1996). Active learning: 101 strategies to teach any subject. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

Sutherland, T. E., & Bonwell, C. C. (Eds.). (1996). Using active learning in college classes: A range of options for faculty. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Topping, K. J., & Ehly, S. W. (1998). Peer-assisted learning. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum Associates.

Twigg, C. A. (2003). Improving learning and reducing costs: New models for online learning. EDUCAUSE Review, 38(5), 28–38.

Twigg, C.A. (2015, November-December) Improving Learning and Reducing Costs: Fifteen Years of Course Redesign. Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, 47(6), 6-13. Retrieved from https://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20Issues/2015/November-December%202015/course-redesign_full.html

University of Arizona, Office of Instruction and Assessment. (n.d.). The learning cycle [Video file]. Retrieved from https://streaming.oia.arizona.edu/clientFlashABR/play.php?clipname=/perm/stem/learning_cycle_research_2014/learning_cycle/web.smil&banner=on&autoplay=off&help=on&aspect=wide

University of Michigan, Center for Research on Learning & Teaching [CRLTeach]. (2014, February 26). Eric Mazur, Harvard University. Peer instruction [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UJRNRdgyvE

VanGundy, A. B. (2005). 101 activities for teaching creativity and problem solving. San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer.

Waitkus, J. (2006). Active learning in humanities courses: Helping students to think critically. Journal of College Teaching & Learning, 3(10), 57–62.

Wieman, C. (2010). Basic instructor habits to keep students engaged. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: https://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/Files/InstructorHabitsToKeepStudentsEngaged_CWSEI.pdf

Wieman, C. (2016). Observation guide for active-learning classroom. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: https://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/Active-learning-class-observation-guide_Wieman.pdf

Using the Active Learning Cycle

Auster, C. J., & MacRone, M. (1994). The classroom as a negotiated social setting: An empirical study of the effects of faculty members' behavior on students' participation. Teaching Sociology, 22, 289–300.

Barkley, E. F., Major, C. H., & Cross, K. P. (2014). Collaborative learning techniques: A handbook for college faculty (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Barton, J., Heilker, P., & Rutkowski, D. (n.d.). Fostering effective classroom discussions. Retrieved from http://www.mhhe.com/socscience/english/tc/pt/discussion/discussion.htm (link no longer active)

Benton, S. L., & Pallett, W. H. (2013, January 29). Class size matters. Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved from https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2013/01/29/essay-importance-class-size-higher-education

Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R.-M. (2016). The online teaching survival guide: Simple and practical pedagogical tips. (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Bonwell, C. C., & Eison, J. A. (1991). Active learning: Creating excitement in the classroom Retrieved from ERIC database. (ED336049)

Brookfield, S. D. (2006). The skillful teacher: On technique, trust, and responsiveness in the classroom (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Brookfield, S. D., & Preskill, S. (2005). Discussion as a way of teaching: Tools and techniques for democratic classrooms (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Cashin, W. E. (2011). Effective classroom discussions (Idea Paper #49). IDEA. Retrieved from https://www.ideaedu.org/Portals/0/Uploads/Documents/IDEA%20Papers/IDEA%20Papers/IDEA_Paper_49.pdf

Cerbin, B. (2010, April 23). Collaborative learning techniques workshop handouts. Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning, UW‐La Crosse. Retrieved from http://www.uwlax.edu/catl/studentlearning/presentations/collaborativelearningtechniqueshandout.pdf (link no longer active)

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Doyle, T. (2008). Helping students learn in a learner-centered environment: A guide to facilitating learning in higher education. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Eikenberry, K. (2007). Brainstorming strategies: Seven questions that spur better solutions. Retrieved from https://www.sideroad.com/Meetings/brainstormingstrategies.html

Howard, J. R. (2015). Discussion in the college classroom: Getting your students engaged and participating in person and online. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Ito, C. (2014). Techniques for active learning. Retrieved from https://www.google.com/url?q=https://education.wm.edu/centers/ttac/documents/packets/techniquesforactivelearning.pdf&sa=U&ved=0ahUKEwiNpt2OnLbcAhURMt8KHUQnAUIQFggUMAg&client=internal-uds-cse&cx=005432296390253795809:mays4xopp1s&usg=AOvVaw1gwXupeTLHedK0q_4hXhgD

Karp, D. A., & Yoels, W. C. (1976). The college classroom: Some observations on the meanings of student participation. Sociology and Social Research, 60, 421–439.

Knight, J. (2013). High-impact instruction: A framework for great teaching. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Moore, M. G. (2012). Handbook of distance education. (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Nilson, L. B., & Goodson, L. A. (2018). Online teaching at its best: Merging instructional design with teaching and learning research. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Novak, G. M., Patterson, E. T., Gavrin, A. D., & Christian, W. (1999). Just-in-time teaching: Blending active learning with web technology. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Orellana, A. (2006). Class size and interaction in online courses. The Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 7, 229–248.

Pohlmann, T., & Thomas, N. M. (2015, March 27). Relearning the art of asking questions. Harvard Business Review. Retrieved from https://hbr.org/2015/03/relearning-the-art-of-asking-questions

Rotenberg, R. L. (2010). The art & craft of college teaching: A guide for new professors & graduate students (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Left Coast Press.

Sidelinger, R. J. (2010). College student involvement: An examination of student characteristics and perceived instructor communication behaviors in the classroom. Communication Studies, 61, 87–103.

Wieman, C. (2010). Basic instructor habits to keep students engaged. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: https://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/Files/InstructorHabitsToKeepStudentsEngaged_CWSEI.pdf

Planning Effective Class Discussions

Auster, C. J., & MacRone, M. (1994). The classroom as a negotiated social setting: An empirical study of the effects of faculty members' behavior on students' participation. Teaching Sociology, 22, 289–300.

Barkley, E. F., Major, C. H., & Cross, K. P. (2014). Collaborative learning techniques: A handbook for college faculty (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Barton, J., Heilker, P., & Rutkowski, D. (n.d.). Fostering effective classroom discussions. Retrieved from http://www.mhhe.com/socscience/english/tc/pt/discussion/discussion.htm (link no longer active)

Benton, S. L., & Pallett, W. H. (2013, January 29). Class size matters. Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved from https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2013/01/29/essay-importance-class-size-higher-education

Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R.-M. (2016). The online teaching survival guide: Simple and practical pedagogical tips. (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Bonwell, C. C., & Eison, J. A. (1991). Active learning: Creating excitement in the classroom Retrieved from ERIC database. (ED336049)

Brookfield, S. D. (2006). The skillful teacher: On technique, trust, and responsiveness in the classroom (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Brookfield, S. D., & Preskill, S. (2005). Discussion as a way of teaching: Tools and techniques for democratic classrooms (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Cashin, W. E. (2011). Effective classroom discussions (Idea Paper #49). IDEA. Retrieved from https://www.ideaedu.org/Portals/0/Uploads/Documents/IDEA%20Papers/IDEA%20Papers/IDEA_Paper_49.pdf

Cerbin, B. (2010, April 23). Collaborative learning techniques workshop handouts. Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning, UW‐La Crosse. Retrieved from http://www.uwlax.edu/catl/studentlearning/presentations/collaborativelearningtechniqueshandout.pdf (link no longer active)

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Doyle, T. (2008). Helping students learn in a learner-centered environment: A guide to facilitating learning in higher education. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Eikenberry, K. (2007). Brainstorming strategies: Seven questions that spur better solutions. Retrieved from https://www.sideroad.com/Meetings/brainstormingstrategies.html

Howard, J. R. (2015). Discussion in the college classroom: Getting your students engaged and participating in person and online. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Ito, C. (2014). Techniques for active learning. Retrieved from https://www.google.com/url?q=https://education.wm.edu/centers/ttac/documents/packets/techniquesforactivelearning.pdf&sa=U&ved=0ahUKEwiNpt2OnLbcAhURMt8KHUQnAUIQFggUMAg&client=internal-uds-cse&cx=005432296390253795809:mays4xopp1s&usg=AOvVaw1gwXupeTLHedK0q_4hXhgD (link no longer active)

Karp, D. A., & Yoels, W. C. (1976). The college classroom: Some observations on the meanings of student participation. Sociology and Social Research, 60, 421–439.

Knight, J. (2013). High-impact instruction: A framework for great teaching. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Moore, M. G. (2012). Handbook of distance education. (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Nilson, L. B., & Goodson, L. A. (2018). Online teaching at its best: Merging instructional design with teaching and learning research. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Novak, G. M., Patterson, E. T., Gavrin, A. D., & Christian, W. (1999). Just-in-time teaching: Blending active learning with web technology. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Orellana, A. (2006). Class size and interaction in online courses. The Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 7, 229–248.

Pohlmann, T., & Thomas, N. M. (2015, March 27). Relearning the art of asking questions. Harvard Business Review. Retrieved from https://hbr.org/2015/03/relearning-the-art-of-asking-questions

Rotenberg, R. L. (2010). The art & craft of college teaching: A guide for new professors & graduate students (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Left Coast Press.

Sidelinger, R. J. (2010). College student involvement: An examination of student characteristics and perceived instructor communication behaviors in the classroom. Communication Studies, 61, 87–103.

Wieman, C. (2010). Basic instructor habits to keep students engaged. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: https://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/Files/InstructorHabitsToKeepStudentsEngaged_CWSEI.pdf

Facilitating Engaging Class Discussions

Alexander, M. E., Commander, N., Greenberg, D., & Ward, T. (2010). Using the four-questions technique to enhance critical thinking in online discussions. Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 6, 409–415.

Auster, C. J., & MacRone, M. (1994). The classroom as a negotiated social setting: An empirical study of the effects of faculty members' behavior on students' participation. Teaching Sociology, 22, 289–300.

Barkley, E. F., Major, C. H., & Cross, K. P. (2014). Collaborative learning techniques: A handbook for college faculty (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Barton, J., Heilker, P., & Rutkowski, D. (n.d.). Fostering effective classroom discussions. Retrieved from http://www.mhhe.com/socscience/english/tc/pt/discussion/discussion.htm (link no longer active)

Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R.-M. (2016). The online teaching survival guide: Simple and practical pedagogical tips (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 

Bonwell, C. C., & Eison, J. A. (1991). Active learning: Creating excitement in the classroom (ED 336 049). Washington, DC: ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education. Retrieved from ERIC database. (ED340272)

Brookfield, S. D., & Preskill, S. (2005). Discussion as a way of teaching: Tools and techniques for democratic classrooms (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Cashin, W. E. (2011). Effective classroom discussions (Idea Paper #49). IDEA. Retrieved from https://www.ideaedu.org/idea_papers/effective-classroom-discussions/

Cerbin, B. (2010, April 23). Collaborative learning techniques workshop handouts. Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning, UW‐La Crosse. Retrieved from http://www.uwlax.edu/catl/studentlearning/presentations/collaborativelearningtechniqueshandout.pdf (link no longer active)

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Doyle, T. (2008). Helping students learn in a learner-centered environment: A guide to facilitating learning in higher education. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Francek, M. (2006, August 14). Promoting discussion in the science classroom using gallery walks. NSTA WebNews Digest. Retrieved from https://www.nsta.org/resources/promoting-discussion-science-classroom-using-gallery-walks 

Howard, J. R. (2015). Discussion in the college classroom: Getting your students engaged and participating in person and online. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Ito, C. (2014). Techniques for active learning. William & Mary, Training & Technical Assistance Center. Retrieved from http://education.wm.edu/centers/ttac/documents/packets/techniquesforactivelearning.pdf (link no longer active)

Knight, J. (2013). High-impact instruction: A framework for great teaching. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Rotenberg, R. L. (2010). The art & craft of college teaching: A guide for new professors & graduate students (2nd ed.). Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press.

Sidelinger, R. J. (2010). College student involvement: An examination of student characteristics and perceived instructor communication behaviors in the classroom. Communication Studies, 61, 87–103.

Twigg, C. A. (2015, November–December). Improving learning and reducing costs: Fifteen years of course description. Change. Retrieved from https://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20Issues/2015/November-December%202015/course-redesign_full.html

Wieman, C. (2010). Basic instructor habits to keep students engaged. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: https://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/Files/InstructorHabitsToKeepStudentsEngaged_CWSEI.pdf

Wieman, C. (2016). Observation guide for active-learning classroom. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: https://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/Active-learning-class-observation-guide_Wieman.pdf

Motivating Your Students

Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., DiPietro, M., Lovett, M. C., & Norman, M. K. (2010). How learning works: Seven research-based principles for smart teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Arsham. H. (n.d.). Student to student: Your fellow students' opinion and advice. Retrieved from https://home.ubalt.edu/ntsbarsh/STUDENT_TO_STUDENT.HTM

Bandura, A. (1988). Self-regulation of motivation and action through goal systems. In V. Hamilton, G. H. Bower, & N. H. Frijda (Eds.), Cognitive perspectives on emotion and motivation (pp. 37-61). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic.

Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R.-M. (2016). The online teaching survival guide: Simple and practical pedagogical tips (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Carnegie Mellon University, Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence & Educational Innovation. (n.d.). Explore potential strategies. Retrieved from https://www.cmu.edu/teaching/solveproblem/strat-lackmotivation/lackmotivation-01.html

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Downing, S. (2011). On course: Strategies for creating success in college and in life (7th ed.). Boston, MA: Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

Ellis, D. B. (2000). Becoming a master student: Tools, techniques, hints, ideas, illustrations, examples, methods, procedures, processes, skills, resources, and suggestions for success. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.

Ellis, D. B. (2006). Becoming a master student (11th ed.). Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.

Fleming, N. (2003). Establishing rapport: Personal interaction and learning (Idea Paper #39). Retrieved from https://www.ideaedu.org/Portals/0/Uploads/Documents/IDEA%20Papers/IDEA%20Papers/IDEA_Paper_39.pdf

Fox, J. (2011, May 24). “Why are we doing this?” Establishing relevance to enhance student learning. Faculty Focus. Retrieved from https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/effective-teaching-strategies/why-are-we-doing-this-establishing-relevance-to-enhance-student-learning/

Hayles, N.K. (2007). Hyper and Deep Attention: The Generational Divide in Cognitive Modes. Profession, pp. 187-199.

Howey, S. C. (1999). The relationship between motivation and academic success of community college freshmen orientation students (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ERIC database. (ED465391)

Merisotis, J. (2015, October 15). Want to be happier and healthier? Then go to college [Blog post]. Huffington Post. Retrieved from https://www.huffingtonpost.com/jamie-merisotis/want-to-be-happier-and-he_b_8288354.html

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Nilson, L. B. (2013). Creating self-regulated learners: Strategies to strengthen students’ self-awareness and learning skills. Sterling, VA: Stylus. 

Nilson, L. B., & Goodson, L. A. (2018). Online teaching at its best: Merging instructional design with teaching and learning research. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Nist-Olejnik, S., & Holschuh, J. P. (2007). College rules! How to study, survive, and succeed in college (2nd ed.). Berkeley, CA: Ten Speed Press.

Trostel, P. (n.d.). It’s not just the money: The benefits of college education to individuals and to society. Retrieved from https://www.luminafoundation.org/files/resources/its-not-just-the-money.pdf

Walton, G. M., & Brady, S. T. (2017). The many questions of belonging. In A.J. Elliott, C.S. Dweck, & D.S. Yeager (Eds.), Handbook of competence and motivation: Theory and application (2nd ed., pp. 272-293). New York, NY: Guilford Press.

Wieman, C. (2010). Basic instructor habits to keep students engaged. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: https://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/Files/InstructorHabitsToKeepStudentsEngaged_CWSEI.pdf

Wieman, C. (2013). Motivating learning. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: https://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/Motivating-Learning_CWSEI.pdf

Wieman, C. (2014). First day of class – recommendations for instructors. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: https://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/First_Day_of_Class.pdf

Providing Clear Directions and Explanations

Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., DiPietro, M., Lovett, M. C., & Norman, M. K. (2010). How learning works: 7 research-based principles for smart teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Angelo, T. A., & Cross, K. P. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Berrett, D. (2015, September 21). The unwritten rules of college. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved from https://chronicle.com/article/The-Unwritten-Rules-of/233245

BrckaLorenz, A., Cole, E., Kinzie, J., & Ribera, A. (2011, April). Examining effective faculty practice: Teaching clarity and student engagement. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, LA. Retrieved from https://cpr.indiana.edu/uploads/AERA%202011%20Teaching%20Clarity%20Paper.pdf

Brookfield, S. D. (2015). The skillful teacher: On technique, trust, and responsiveness in the classroom (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Chesebro, J. L. (2003). Effects of teacher clarity and nonverbal immediacy on student learning, receiver apprehension, and affect. Communication Education, 52, 135–147. 

Chesebro, J. L., & McCroskey, J. C. (2001). The relationship of teacher clarity and immediacy with student state receiver apprehension, affect, and cognitive learning. Communication Education, 50, 59–68.

Cooper, T. (2007–2008). Collaboration or plagiarism? Explaining collaborative-based assignments clearly. Essays on Teaching Excellence: Toward the Best in the Academy, 19(1). Retrieved from https://podnetwork.org/content/uploads/V19-N1-Cooper.pdf

Cornelius, T. L., & Owen-DeSchryver, J. (2008). Differential effects of full and partial notes on learning outcomes and attendance. Teaching of Psychology, 35, 6–12.

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Erickson, B. L., Peters, C. B., & Weltner Strommer, D. (2006). Teaching first-year college students, Revised and Expanded Edition of Teaching College Freshmen. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 

Filene, P. G. (2005). The joy of teaching: A practical guide for new college instructors. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Gliessman, D. H. (1987). Changing complex teaching skills. Journal of Education for Teaching, 13, 267–275.

Lang, J. M. (2008). On course: A week-by-week guide to your first semester of college teaching. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Larson, R. B. (2009). Enhancing the recall of presented material. Computers & Education, 53, 1278–1284.

Metcalf, K. K., & Cruickshank, D. R. (1991). Can teachers be trained to make clear presentations? Journal of Educational Research, 85, 107–116. 

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Smith, L. R. (1982). A review of two low-inference teacher behaviors related to performance of college students. Review of Higher Education, 5, 159–167. 

Sorcinelli, M. D. (n.d.). Explained course material clearly and concisely. IDEA Retrieved from https://ideaedu.org/research-and-papers/pod-idea-notes-on-instruction/idea-item-no-10/

Titsworth, S. (n. d.). Translating research into instructional practice: Instructor clarity. Retrieved from https://www.tamdistrict.org/cms/lib/CA01000875/Centricity/Domain/55/PDF-TRIP-Instructor_Clarity.pdf

Weimer, M. (2013). Learner-centered teaching: Five key changes to practice (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Weimer, M. (2015, November 18). Are we clear? Tips for creating better explanations. Faculty Focus. Retrieved from https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-professor-blog/are-we-clear-tips-for-crafting-better-explanations/

Wieman, C. (2010). Basic instructor habits to keep students engaged. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: https://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/Files/InstructorHabitsToKeepStudentsEngaged_CWSEI.pdf

Zull, J. E. (2002). The art of changing the brain: Enriching teaching by exploring the biology of learning. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Using Concept Maps and Other Visualization Tools

Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., DiPietro, M., Lovett, M. C., & Norman, M. K. (2010). How learning works: Seven research-based principles for smart teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Angelo, T. A., & Cross, K. P. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Boettcher, J. V. (2011, February 23). Evidence of Learning Online: Assessment Beyond the Paper. Campus Technology. Retrieved from https://campustechnology.com/Articles/2011/02/23/Assessment-Beyond-The-Paper.aspx?p=1

Boettcher, J. V. & Conrad, R.-M. (2016). The online teaching survival guide: Simple and practical pedagogical tips (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Brookfield, S. D. (2015). The skillful teacher: On technique, trust, and responsiveness in the classroom (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Bruff, D. (2013, November 1). Show and tell: More visual presentations [Prezi slides]. Retrieved from https://prezi.com/vlqxdjxfz6gx/show-and-tell-more-visual-presentations/

Bruff, D. (2015, March 16). Mapping a discussion with clickable image polls [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://www.polleverywhere.com/blog/mapping-a-discussion-with-clickable-image-polls/

Bruff, D. (2018). Students as (Podcast) Producers. Retrieved from https://derekbruff.org/?p=3309

Carnegie Mellon University, Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation. (n.d.). Using concept maps. Retrieved from https://www.cmu.edu/teaching/assessment/assesslearning/conceptmaps.html

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Edel-Malizia, S. (n.d.). Concept mapping. Sites at Penn State. Retrieved from https://sites.psu.edu/pedagogicalpractices/concept-mapping/

EDUCAUSE. (2007, January 15). 7 Things You Should Know about Digital Storytelling. Retrieved from https://library.educause.edu/resources/2007/1/7-things-you-should-know-about-digital-storytelling

Franker, K. (2017, February 21). Rubric for graphic organizers – Inspiration diagrams/concept maps. University of Wisconsin-Stout. Retrieved from https://www2.uwstout.edu/content/profdev/rubrics/inspirationrubric.html

Newbury, P. (2010, August). Concept mapping in Astro 101. Paper presented at Cosmos in the Classroom, Boulder, CO. Abstract retrieved from https://blogs.ubc.ca/polarisdotca/files/2011/01/ConceptMappingWorkshop.pdf

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Novak, J. D., & Cañas, A. J. (2008). The theory underlying concept maps and how to construct and use them, technical report IHMC Cmap 2006-01 rev 01-2008. Retrieved from Institute for Human and Machine Cognition website: https://cmap.ihmc.us/docs/pdf/TheoryUnderlyingConceptMaps.pdf

Ortega, R. A., & Brame, C. J. (2015). The synthesis map is a multidimensional educational tool that provides insight into students’ mental models and promotes students’ synthetic knowledge generation. CBE—Life Sciences Education, 14(2), 1-11.

Picard, D., & Bruff, D. (2016, June). Digital timelines. Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/digital-timelines/

Robin, B. R. (2008). Digital storytelling: A powerful technology tool for the 21st century classroom. Theory Into Practice, 47, 220–228.

Schau, C., Mattern, N., & Zeilik, M. (1995). Solar system fill-in concept map. Retrieved from https://archive.wceruw.org/cl1/oldflag/tools/conmap/solarkey.htm

Using Student Achievement and Feedback to Improve Your Teaching

Angelo, T. A., & Cross, P. K. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Benton, S. L., & Cashin, W. E. (2014). Student ratings of teaching: A summary of research and literature (Idea Paper No. 50). IDEA. Retrieved from https://www.ideaedu.org/Portals/0/Uploads/Documents/IDEA%20Papers/IDEA%20Papers/PaperIDEA_50.pdf

Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R.-M. (2016). The online teaching survival guide: Simple and practical pedagogical tips (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Cashin, W. E. (1995). Student ratings of teaching: The research revisited (Idea Paper No. 32). IDEA. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED402338.pdf

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Christensen, C. R., Garvin, D. A., & Sweet, A. (Eds.). (1991). Education for judgment: The artistry of discussion leadership. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Farmer, D. W., & Napieralski, E. A. (1997). Assessing learning in programs. In J. G. Gaff & J. L. Ratcliff (Eds.), Handbook of the undergraduate curriculum: A comprehensive guide to purposes, structures, practices, and change (pp. 591-607). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Felder, R. M. (1992). What do they know, anyway? Chemical Engineering Education, 26, 134–135.

Gravestock, P., & Gregor-Greenleaf, E. (2008). Student course evaluations: Research, models and trends. Toronto, ON, Canada: Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario. Retrieved from https://www.heqco.ca/SiteCollectionDocuments/Student%20Course%20Evaluations_Research,%20Models%20and%20Trends.pdf

Hattie, J. (2012). Visible learning for teachers: Maximizing impact on learning. New York, NY: Routledge.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Rojstaczer, S. (2012, September 18). Student evaluations offer bad data that leads to the wrong answer. New York Times. Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2012/09/17/professors-and-the-students-who-grade-them/student-evaluations-offer-bad-data-that-leads-to-the-wrong-answer

Seldin, P. (1997). Using student feedback to improve teaching. In D. DeZure (Ed.), To improve the academy (Vol. 16, pp. 335–346). Stillwater, OK: New Forums Press and the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education.

Stanford University, Center for Teaching and Learning. (1997). Using student evaluations to improve teaching. Speaking of Teaching: Stanford University Newsletter on Teaching, 9, 1–4.

Suskie, L. (2009). Assessing student learning: A common sense guide (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Svinicki, M. D., & McKeachie, W. J. (2010). McKeachie’s teaching tips: Strategies, research, and theory for college and university teachers (13th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Theall, M. (2003). Student ratings: Myths vs. research evidence. Vanderbilt University, Center for Teaching. Retrieved from https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/articles-and-essays/the-teaching-forum/student-ratings-myths-vs-research-evidence/

University of Michigan, Center for Research on Learning and Teaching. (n.d.). Improving your teaching: Obtaining feedback. Retrieved from https://www.crlt.umich.edu/gsis/p9_1

University of Northern Iowa, Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning. (n.d.). Small group instructional diagnosis. Retrieved from https://www.uni.edu/provost/cetl/small-group-instructional-diagnosis

Vanderbilt University, Center for Teaching. (n.d.). Student evaluations of teaching. Retrieved from https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/student-evaluations/

Using Advanced Questioning Techniques

Boettcher, J. V. (2018). Socratic questioning sequence. Unpublished manuscript. Designing for Learning: Tallahasse, FL.

Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R.-M. (2016). The online teaching survival guide: Simple and practical pedagogical tips. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Bloom, B. S., Engelhart, M. D., Furst, E. J., Hill, W. H., & Krathwohl, D. R. (1956). Taxonomy of educational objectives: The classification of educational goals. Handbook I: Cognitive domain. New York, NY: McKay.

Brookfield, S. D., & Preskill, S. (2016). The discussion book: 50 great ways to get people talking. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Elder, L., & Paul, R. (2009). The thinker’s guide to the art of asking essential questions (4th ed.). Dillon Beach, CA: Foundation for Critical Thinking.

Lemons, P. P., & Lemons, J. D. (2013). Questions for assessing higher-order cognitive skills: It’s not just Bloom’s. CBE Life Sciences Education, 12, 47–58.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Paul, R., & Elder, L. (1997, April). Socratic teaching. Retrieved from https://www.criticalthinking.org/pages/socratic-teaching/606

Paul, R., & Elder, L. (2006). The thinker’s guide to the art of Socratic Questioning (4th ed.). Dillon Beach, CA: Foundation for Critical Thinking.

Developing Self-Directed Learners

Abdullah, M. H. (2001). Self-directed learning Retrieved from ERIC database. (ED459458)

Ackerman, D. S., & Gross, B. L. (2005). My instructor made me do it: Task characteristics of procrastination. Journal of Marketing Education, 27, 5–13.

Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., Lovett, M. C., DiPietro, M., & Norman, M. K. (2010). How learning works: Seven research-based principles for smart teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R.-M. (2016). The online teaching survival guide: Simple and practical pedagogical tips (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Bowen, J. (2013, August 22). Cognitive wrappers: Using metacognition and reflection to improve learning [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://josebowen.com/cognitive-wrappers-using-metacognition-and-reflection-to-improve-learning/

Brookfield, S. D. (2015). The skillful teacher: On technique, trust, and responsiveness in the classroom (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Carey, L. J., Flower, L., Hayes, J., Shriver, K.A., & Haas, C. (1989). Differences in writers’ initial task representations (Technical Report No. 34). Center for the Study of Writing at University of California at Berkeley and Carnegie Mellon University.

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Connor, C. (2004). Developing self-directed learners. Retrieved from https://www.schoolnet.org.za/conference/sessions/nh/self-directed_learning.pdf

Cornell University, Center for Teaching Innovation. (n.d.). Assessing prior knowledge. Retrieved from https://teaching.cornell.edu/spring-teaching-resources/assessment-evaluation/assessing-prior-knowledge

Conrad, R.-M., & Donaldson, J. A. (2011). Engaging the online learner, updated: activities and resources for creative instruction. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

DeLong, M., & Winter, D. (2002). Learning to teach and teaching to learn mathematics: Resources for professional development. Washington, DC: Mathematical Association of America.

Dweck, C. S. (2007). Mindset: The new psychology of success. New York, NY: Ballantine Books.

Fayetteville State University. (n.d.). Create engaging assignments and clear assignment sheets. Retreived from http://www.uncfsu.edu/learning-center/wac/faculty-home/formal-writing-project/engaging-and-clear (link no longer active)

Harris, C. (2014, June 6). Teaching from the test: Exam wrappers [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://www.purdue.edu/learning/blog/?p=7050 (link no longer active)

Shannon, S. V. (2008). Using metacognitive strategies and learning styles to create self-directed learners. Institute for Learning Styles Research Journal, 1, 14–28.

The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Walker Center for Teaching and Learning. (n.d.). Classroom assessment strategies. Retrieved from https://www.utc.edu/walker-center-teaching-learning/teaching-resources/classroom-assessment-strategies.php

Establishing Powerful Learning Outcomes

Academic Partnerships. (2013, July 8). Align course and module objectives: Prepping a course to collect analytics. Faculty eCommons. Retrieved from https://facultyecommons.com/learning-analytics-aligning-course-and-module-objectives/

Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., DiPietro, M., Lovett, M. C., & Norman, M. K. (2010). How learning works: Seven research-based principles for smart teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 

Anderson, L. W. (Ed.), Krathwohl, D. R. (Ed.), Airasian, P. W., Cruikshank, K. A., Mayer, R. E., Pintrich, P. R., . . . Wittrock, M. C. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives (Complete ed.). New York, NY: Longman.

Angelo, T. A., & Cross, K. P. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy. (2015, January 15). Retrieved from https://www.commonsense.org/education/videos/blooms-digital-taxonomy

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. American Association of Higher Education Bulletin, 39(7), 3–7.

Cummins, M., Adams Becker, S., & Alexander, B. (2016). NMC Horizon Project Strategic Brief on Digital Literacy. Vol 3.3: The New Media Consortium. Retrieved from https://www.learntechlib.org/p/173858/

Eshet-Alkalai, Y. (2004). Digital literacy: A conceptual framework for survival skills in the digital era. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 13(1), 93–106.

Fink, L. D. (2013). Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to designing college courses (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Harrow, A. J. (1972). A taxonomy of psychomotor domain: A guide for developing behavioral objectives. New York, NY: McKay.

Krathwohl, D. R., Bloom, B. S., & Masia, B. B. (1956). Taxonomy of educational objectives: The classification of educational goals. Handbook II: Affective domain. New York, NY: McKay.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Sneed, O. (2016, May 9). Integrating technology with Bloom’s Taxonomy. Retrieved from https://teachonline.asu.edu/2016/05/integrating-technology-blooms-taxonomy/

Twigg, C. A. (2003). Improving learning and reducing costs: New models for online learning. EDUCAUSE Review, 38(5), 28–38.

Aligning Assessments With Course Outcomes

Anderson, L. W., & Krathwohl, D. R. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives. White Plains, NY: Longman.

Angelo, T. A. (1995). Improving classroom assessment to improve learning. Assessment Update, 7(6), 1–2, 13–14.

Angelo, T. A. (2012). Designing subjects for learning: Practical, research-based principles and guidelines. In L. Hunt & D. Chalmers (Eds.), University teaching in focus: A learning-centred approach (pp. 93–111). Melbourne, Australia: ACER Press.

Biggs, J. B., & Tang, C. S-k. (2007). Teaching for quality learning at university (3rd ed.). Maidenhead, UK: Open University Press.

Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R.-M. (2016). The online teaching survival guide: Simple and practical pedagogical tips. (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Brown, S., & Race, P. (2012). Using effective assessment to promote learning. In L. Hunt & D. Chalmers (Eds.), University teaching in focus: A learning-centred approach (pp. 74–91). Melbourne, Australia: ACER Press.

Carnegie Mellon University, Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence & Educational Innovation. (n.d.) Whys and hows of assessment. Retrieved from https://www.cmu.edu/teaching/assessment/basics/index.html

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

International Accreditation Council for Business Education. (2014). Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives and writing intended learning outcomes statements. Retrieved from https://iacbe.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Blooms-Taxonomy-of-Educational-Objectives-partial.pdf

James, R., & McInnis, C. (2001). Strategically re-positioning student assessment: A discussion paper on assessment of student learning in universities. Centre for the Study of Higher Education, The University of Melbourne.

Kan, C. K. (2010, August). Using test blueprint in classroom assessment: Why and how. Paper presented at the 36th International Association for Educational Assessment (IAEA) Annual Conference, Bangkok, Thailand. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/305404/Using_test_blueprint_in_classroom_assessments_why_and_how

Mason, R., Pegler, C., & Weller, M. (2004). E-portfolios: An assessment tool for online courses. British Journal of Educational Technology, 35, 717–727.

Myers, C. B., & Myers, S. M. (2007). Assessing assessment: The effects of two exam formats on course achievement and evaluation. Innovative Higher Education, 31, 227–236.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.    

Nilson, L. B., & Goodson, L. A. (2018). Online teaching at its best: Merging instructional design with teaching and learning research. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

O’Brien, K. (2010, October 3). The test has been canceled: Final exams are quietly vanishing from college. The Boston Globe. Retrieved from https://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/ideas/articles/2010/10/03/the_test_has_been_canceled/

Ohio State University. (2016, September 12). Assessment myths. Retrieved from https://gradsch.osu.edu/faculty-staff-resources/learning-goals-assessment/assessment-myths 

Palloff, R. M., & Pratt, K. (2008). Assessing the online learner: Resources and strategies for faculty. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Picard, D., & Bruff, D. (2016, June). Digital Timelines. Retrieved May 29, 2018, from https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/digital-timelines/

Popham, W. J. (2003). Test better, teach better: The instructional role of assessment. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Reiner, C. M. (2002). How to prepare effective essay questions: Guidelines for university faculty (Doctoral dissertation). Brigham Young University, Provo, UT.

Stiggins, R. J. (1997). Student-centered classroom assessment (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill.

Suskie, L. (2009). Assessing student learning: A common sense guide (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Tergan, S. O., & Keller, T. (2005). Digital concept mapping in learning contexts: Integrating knowledge, arguments and information resources. In Ninth International Conference on Information Visualisation (IV’05) (pp. 371–376). London, UK: IEEE Computer Society.

Twigg, C. A. (2003). Improving learning and reducing costs: New models for online learning. EDUCAUSE Review, 38(5), 28–38.

Wiggins, G. P., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design (expanded 2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Aligning Activities and Assignments With Course Outcomes

Allen, I. E., & Seaman, J. (2017). Digital learning compass: Distance education enrollment report 2017. Retrieved from https://onlinelearningsurvey.com/reports/digtiallearningcompassenrollment2017.pdf

Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., DiPietro, M., Lovett, M. C., Norman, M. K. (2010). How learning works: 7 research-based principles for smart teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Anderson, L. W., & Krathwohl, D. R. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives. White Plains, NY: Longman.

Angelo, T. A. (2012). Designing subjects for learning: Practical, research-based principles and guidelines. In L. Hunt & D. Chalmers (Eds.), University teaching in focus: A learning-centred approach (pp. 93–111). Melbourne, Australia: ACER Press.

Biggs, J. B., & Tang, C. S-k. (2007). Teaching for quality learning at university (3rd ed.). Maidenhead, UK: Open University Press.

Biggs, J. B., & Tang, C. S-k. (2011). Teaching for quality learning at university: What the student does (4th ed.). Maidenhead, England: McGraw-Hill/Society for Research into Higher Education/Open University Press.

Bok, D. C. (2006). Our underachieving colleges: A candid look at how much students learn and why they should be learning more. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Head, A., & Hostetler, K. (2015, September 2). Mary-Ann Winkelmes: Transparency in teaching and learning. Retrieved from https://www.projectinfolit.org/mary-ann-winkelmes-smart-talk.html

Intentional Futures. (2017). High-tech, high-touch: Serving student needs at scale. Retrieved from https://intentionalfutures.com/static/high-tech-high-touch-report-1b0482e00ccce5da2ea0175454a1bdb0.pdf

Jones, E. A., et al. (1995). National assessment of college student learning: Identifying college graduates; essential skills in writing, speech and listening, and critical thinking (ED383255). Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED383255.pdf

Lowenthal, P. R., Wilson, B. G., & Parrish, P. (2009). Context matters: A description and typology of the online learning landscape. Proceedings of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology, 2. Retrieved from https://members.aect.org/pdf/Proceedings/proceedings09/2009I/09_20.pdf

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.   

Staley, C. C. (2003). 50 ways to leave your lectern: Active learning strategies to engage first-year students. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning.

Svinicki, M. D., & McKeachie, W. J. (2014). McKeachie’s teaching tips: Strategies, research, and theory for college and university teachers (14th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Twigg, C. A. (2003). Improving learning and reducing costs: New models for online learning. EDUCAUSE Review, 38(5), 28–38.

Walvoord, B. E., & Anderson, V. J. (2009). Effective grading: A tool for learning and assessment in college (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Wieman, C. (2016). Observation guide for active-learning classroom. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: https://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/Active-learning-class-observation-guide_Wieman.pdf

Wiggins, G. P., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design (expanded 2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Winkelmes, M.-A. (2013). Transparent assignment template. Retrieved from https://www.unlv.edu/sites/default/files/page_files/27/Provost-Faculty-TransparentAssgntTemplate-2016.pdf

Winkelmes, M.-A., Copeland, D., Jorgensen, E., Sloat, A., Smedley, A., Pizor, P., . . . Jalene, S. (2015, May). Benefits (some unexpected) of transparently designed assignments. The National Teaching and Learning Forum, 24(4), 4–6.

Developing Fair, Consistent, and Transparent Grading Practices

Banta, T. W. (2003). Portfolio assessment: Uses, cases, scoring, and impact. San Francisco, CA: Wiley.

Bart, M., (2011, November 9). Does extra credit have a place in the college classroom? [Blog post]. Faculty Focus. Retrieved from https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-and-learning/does-extra-credit-have-a-place-in-the-college-classroom/

Brookhart, S. M. (1999). The art and science of classroom assessment: The missing part of pedagogy. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report, 27(1).

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Davis, B. G. (1993). Tools for teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Dominowski, R. L. (2001). Teaching undergraduates. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Forsyth, D. R. (2003). The professor’s guide to teaching: Psychological principles and practices. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Gronlund, N. E., & Waugh, C. K. (2009). Assessment of student achievement (9th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Illinois State University, Center for Teaching, Learning, and Technology. (n.d.). Design your course: Module 9: Developing a grading system. Retrieved from https://ctlt.illinoisstate.edu/pedagogy/modules/design/module9/

Lansing Community College, Center for Teaching Excellence. (n.d.) Determining a grading system for your course. Retrieved from https://www.lcc.edu/cte/resources/teachingtips/course_grading_system.aspx

Moallem, M. (2005). Designing and managing student assessment in an online learning environment. In P. Comeaux (Ed.), Assessing Online Learning (pp. 18–34). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Nilson, L. B. (2014). Specifications grading: Restoring rigor, motivating students, and saving faculty time. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Nilson, L. B. (2016, January 19). Yes, Virginia, there’s a better way to grade. Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved from https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2016/01/19/new-ways-grade-more-effectively-essay

Nilson, L. B. (in press). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (4th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Packard, E. (2008). Proactive policies: Experts weigh in on the administrative side of classroom teaching. gradPSYCH Magazine. Retrieved from https://www.apa.org/gradpsych/features/2008/proactive.aspx

Payne, D. A. (2003). Applied educational assessment (2nd ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Thomson Learning.

Shepard, L. A. (2006). Classroom assessment. In R. L. Brennan (Ed.), Educational measurement (4th ed., pp. 623-646). Westport, CT: Praeger.

UNC Charlotte, The Center for Teaching and Learning. (n.d.). Assessment and feedback. Retrieved from https://teaching.uncc.edu/services-programs/teaching-guides/assessment-and-feedback

Walvoord, B. E., & Anderson, V. J. (2010). Effective grading: A tool for learning and assessment in college (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Weimer, M. (2017, May 3). Point-based grading systems: Benefits and liabilities. [Blog post]. Faculty Focus. Retrieved from https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-professor-blog/point-based-grading-systems-benefits-liabilities/

Whitford, F. W. (1992). Teaching psychology: A guide for the new instructor. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Developing and Using Rubrics and Checklists

Allen, D., & Tanner, K. (2006). Rubrics: Tools for making learning goals and evaluation criteria explicit for both teachers and learners. CBE Life Sciences Education, 5, 197–203.

Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., Lovett, M. C., DiPietro, M., & Norman, M. K. (2010). How learning works: Seven research-based principles for smart teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Berkeley University of California. (n.d.). Helping students understand their grades. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://gsi.berkeley.edu/gsi-guide-contents/grading-intro/communicating-about-grades/understand/

Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R.-M. (2016). The online teaching survival guide: Simple and practical pedagogical tips. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Bresciani, M. J., Zelna, C. L., & Anderson J. A. (2004). Assessing student learning and development: A handbook for practitioners. Washington, DC: National Association of Student Personnel Administrators.

Carnegie Mellon University, Eberly Center. (n.d.). Grading and performance rubrics. Retrieved from https://www.cmu.edu/teaching/designteach/teach/rubrics.html

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Deters, F. Cuthrell, K., & Stapleton, J. (2010). Why wikis? Student perceptions of using wikis in online coursework. MERLOT Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 6(1).

Gooblar, D. (2014, October 8). Why I don't like rubrics. Retrieved from https://chroniclevitae.com/news/742-why-i-don-t-like-rubrics

Jonsson, A., & Svingby, G. (2007). The use of scoring rubrics: Reliability, validity and educational consequences. Educational Research Review, 2, 130–144.

Kinsey, J., & Carrozzino, A. L. (2011). Working in a wiki: A tool for collaboration among virtual teams. Journal of Extension, 49(6).

Luft, J. A. (1999). Rubrics: Design and use in science teacher education. Journal of Science Teacher Education, 10, 107–121.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.) San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Panadero, E., & Jonsson, A. (2013). The use of scoring rubrics for formative assessment purposes: A review. Educational Research Review, 9, 129–144.

Reddy, Y. M., & Andrade, H. (2010). A review of rubric use in higher education. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 35, 435–448.

Stevens, D. D., & Levi, A. J. (2013). Introduction to rubrics: An assessment tool to save grading time, convey effective feedback, and promote student learning (2nd ed.) Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Suskie, L. A. (2009). Assessing student learning: A common sense guide (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Svinicki, M. D., & McKeachie, W. J. (2014). McKeachie’s teaching tips: Strategies, research, and theory for college and university teachers (14th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

University of North Carolina Wilmington. (2009). Scoring rubrics: Converting scores to grades. Retrieved from https://uncw.edu/cas/assessment/rubrics/scorestogrades.html

Vanderbilt University, Center for Teaching. (n.d.). Grading student work. Retrieved from https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/grading-student-work/

Walvoord, B. E. F., & Anderson, V. J. (2010). Effective grading: A tool for learning and assessment (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Preparing an Effective Syllabus

Appleby, D. C. (1994). How to improve your teaching with the course syllabus. Observer, 7(3). Retrieved from https://www.psychologicalscience.org/observer/how-to-improve-your-teaching-with-the-course-syllabus

Barkley, E. F., Cross, K. P., & Major, C. H. (2005). Collaborative learning techniques: A handbook for college faculty. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R.-M. (2016). The online teaching survival guide: Simple and practical pedagogical tips (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Chapman, S. (n.d.). Getting students to read the class syllabus. Retrieved from https://tilt.colostate.edu/TipsAndGuides/Tip/50

Chase, B., Germundsen, R., Cady Brownstein, J., & Schaak Distad, L. (2001). Making the connection between increased student learning and reflective practice. Educational Horizons, 79, 143–147.

Clark, C. (2014, August 26). Turn your syllabus into an infographic [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://ltlatnd.wordpress.com/2014/08/26/turn-your-syllabus-into-an-infographic/

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Grunert O’Brien, J. (1997). The course syllabus: A learning-centered approach. Bolton, MA: Anker.

Grunert O’Brien, J. G., Millis, B. J., & Cohen, M. W. (2008). The course syllabus: A learning-centered approach (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Guertin, L. (2014, August 27). Getting students to read the syllabus with a syllabus quiz [Blog post]. Retrieved from the American Geophysical Union website at https://blogs.agu.org/geoedtrek/2014/08/27/syllabus-quiz/

Harnish, R. J., McElwee, R. O., Slattery, J. M., Frantz, S., Haney, M. R., Shore, C. M., & Penley, J. (2011). Creating the Foundation for a Warm Classroom Climate. APS Observer, 24(1).

Kaufmann, K. (2003). Building a learner centered syllabus. Retrieved from https://www.4faculty.org/Demo/read2_main.htm

Moryl, R., & Foy, S. (n.d.). A graphic is worth a thousand words: Develop a graphic syllabus for your course [PowerPoint slides]. Retrieved from http://graphicsyllabus.blogs.emmanuel.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2013/05/graphicSyllabus_PPT_PDF.pdf (link no longer active)

Nilson, L. B. (2007). The graphic syllabus and the outcomes map: Communicating your course. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Nilson, L. B. (2010). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Nilson, L. B. (in press). Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors (4th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Parkes, J., & Harris, M. B. (2002). The purposes of a syllabus. College Teaching, 50, 55–61.

Riviere, J. (2014). Syllabus construction. Retrieved from https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/syllabus-design

Rutgers University, Center for Teaching Advancement and Assessment Research. (n.d.). Syllabus design. Retrieved from https://ctaar.rutgers.edu/teaching/syllabus/

Sample, M. (2011, May 31). Planning a class with backward design [Blog post]. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved from https://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/planning-a-class-with-backward-design/33625

Sinor, J., & Kaplan, M. Creating your syllabus. Retrieved from https://www.crlt.umich.edu/gsis/p2_1

Smith, R. (2014). Conquering the Content: A Blueprint for Online Course Design and Development San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass 

Twigg, C. A. (2003). Improving learning and reducing costs: New models for online learning. EDUCAUSE Review, 38(5), 28–38.

Wallace, D. F. (2014, November 10). David Foster Wallace’s mind-blowing creative nonfiction syllabus: “This does not mean an essayist’s goal is to ‘share’ or ‘express herself’ or whatever feel-good term you got taught in high school.” Retrieved from https://www.salon.com/2014/11/10/david_foster_wallaces_mind_blowing_creative_nonfiction_syllabus_this_does_not_mean_an_essayist’s_goal_is_to_share_or_express_herself_or_whatever_feel_good_term_you_got_taught_in_h/

Wieman, C. (2014). First day of class – recommendations for instructors. Retrieved from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia website: https://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/First_Day_of_Class.pdf

Wilson, S. (2006, April 21). Classroom realities. Insider Higher Ed. Retrieved from https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2006/04/21/classroom-realities

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