Scenarios

Every course is different, but you may find some inspiration from these examples of how faculty responded to an unexpected campus closure. All scenarios and names are fictitious.

Introductory History Course - Interactive Lectures

Scenario: Dr. Martin teaches an introductory history course to about 100 students in a large lecture hall on Tuesdays and Thursdays for 75 minutes. In each class session, she lectures for about 50% of the time, broken up frequently with discussions and asks practice questions via a student response system (together these activities take the other 50% of class time). Dr. Martin gives scantron quizzes once per week and uses the student response system to record attendance in each class. Dr. Martin's Blackboard course primarily contains her syllabus and links to extra resources from the course textbook.

Solution: In response to an extended campus closure, Dr. Martin decided to use her Blackboard course to facilitate the course activities online. She created a folder in Blackboard for each week of her course and included instructions for each week's activities and links to tools and resources for each week. Dr. Martin used Blackboard Collaborate to hold a live (synchronous) online session each Tuesday, in a similar style to her face-to-face class sessions, with a mix of lecture and discussion. Instead of the student response system, she asked practice questions via the integrated polling tool. She also used Collaborate for 2 hours of online office hours each week.

To replace her Thursday sessions, Dr. Martin recorded a 10-minute content presentation using VoiceThread and posted the link for students to watch and respond to. Students read in their texts as usual and responded to question prompts in the VoiceThread using a microphone or telephone. Dr. Martin converted her paper quizzes to Blackboard quizzes and provided students a 24-hour window within which to complete them.

Applied Information Systems Course - Software-Based Course

Scenario: Professor Landis teaches a business analytics course that meets one night per week for three hours. In most class sessions, Professor Landis provides a brief lecture, a brief software demonstration in Excel, and provides support while students perform analyses on their own laptops individually and in groups. Students are also provided time to work on their group project, which is a data-analysis project requiring a written report and a group presentation.

Solution: In response to an extended campus closure, Professor Landis used her Blackboard course to facilitate the course activities online. She created a folder in Blackboard for each week of her course and included instructions for each week's activities and links to tools and resources for each week. She used a screen casting tool called "Screencastify" to capture short screen recordings of Excel analyses and uploaded these to VoiceThread for students to playback. Students were able to pause the video and ask questions by posting a comment if there was something in the demonstration that they did not understand. In addition, Professor Landis found videos on Microsoft's help site and in LinkedIn Learning that she shared with her students as additional examples of the analyses.

Professor Landis created detailed assignment instructions allowing students to work independently through the analytic assignments, documenting their results for submission to Blackboard. Students used Blackboard Collaborate to virtually meet and work through their project. Professor Landis also held office hours in Blackboard Collaborate. Students uploaded their final project presentation slides to VoiceThread and narrated the presentation using the built-in narration tools.

Graduate Course in Communications - Student-Created Media and Discussions

Scenario: Dr. Lawrence teaches a graduate course in Communications that meets Mondays and Wednesdays for 75 minutes. Generally, Dr. Lawrence plays a short media clip or film which that serves as the impetus for small group and class discussion. Assignments in this course include student-created media and reflective writing, along with individual project presentation.

Solution: In response to an extended campus closure, Dr. Lawrence used her Blackboard course to facilitate the course activities online. She created a folder in Blackboard for each week of her course and included instructions for each week's activities and links to tools and resources for each week. Working with the library, Dr. Lawrence identified media available both publicly and via the Library's Kanopy subscription and embedded this media in her weekly folders. Students watched these clips and discussed in Blackboard discussion forums. Students created media and uploaded the videos to VoiceThread to share with classmates and prompt further discussion. Students submitted writing assignments via the Blackboard Assignment tool, which Dr. Lawrence graded using an interactive rubric and inline grading annotations to provide students with extensive feedback.

Introductory Science Course - Lab

Scenario: Dr. Lopez teaches several sections of a biological science lab to students in a campus lab space once per week for 110 minutes. Students use microscopes, laboratory tools and chemicals, and work in groups to conduct experiments, analyze results, and write lab reports. Every other week students complete a paper-and-pencil quiz.

Solution: In response to an extended campus closure, Dr. Lopez decided to create a simple Blackboard course to facilitate the course activities online. He created a folder in Blackboard for each week of his course and included instructions for each week's activities and links to tools and resources for each week. Dr. Lopez worked with the biology textbook publisher to get access to a package of virtual lab videos and simulation that accompany the textbook and substituted these virtual labs for several of the in-person labs he had originally planned.

Unable to find a virtual lab or simulation for two specific labs, Dr. Lopez found one demonstration lab on Lynda.com and posted it in the course, and made a recording of himself conducting the final lab using his cell phone, posted the video to VoiceThread, and linked to the video in Blackboard. Instead of working in a group on the virtual labs, students worked individually to complete these replacement labs, including writing and submitting lab reports in Microsoft Word, and discussed their individual findings in a Blackboard discussion forum based on question prompts supplied by Dr. Lopez. He also created Blackboard quizzes in place of the paper-and-pencil quizzes and used Blackboard Collaborate to conduct an hour of online office hours twice per week.

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