NIU  Flesh and Bone: Analyses of Neandertal fossils reveal diet was high in meat content

Fred SmithFred H. Smith is a biological anthropologist with specific interests in human paleontology and functional anatomy.

His research focuses primarily on understanding the adaptive basis of European Neandertal morphology, on determining the role of Neandertals in human evolution, and on the broader issue of the nature of modern human origins.

He has conducted field and laboratory research in Europe (particularly central Europe) and Africa and has held visiting professorships at the Universities of Hamburg (Germany) and Zagreb (Croatia).

Professor Smith teaches courses in human paleontology, human osteology, introductory biological anthropology, and the paleolithic prehistory of Europe and Africa.

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Fred Smith, Northern Illinois University

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Erik TrinkausErik Trinkaus, professor of anthropology in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, specializes in biological physical anthropology, researching the evolution of the genus Homo as a background to recent human diversity.

He focuses on the aleoanthropological study of late archaic and early modern humans, emphasizing biological reflections of the nature,
degree and patterning of the behavioral shifts between these two groups of Pleistocene humans. This research includes considerations of the "origins of modern humans" debate, the interpretation of the archeological record and patterns of recent human anatomical variations.

His work focuses principally on analyses of human fossil remains. His current research includes radiocarbon dating and bone isotope testing of Neandertal fossils at the Vindija cave site in Croatia and analyses of a 24,500-year-old skeleton of an early modern human child with distinctive Neandertal characteristics found in Portugal. Trinkaus has written several books and numerous journal articles on the Neandertals.

Photo credit: Washington University

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