POLS 672 SYLLABUS

TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS

“Politics of Cambodia”

Professor Kheang Un, Ph.D.

Office:  Zulauf 411

Tel: (815) 753-1022

Office Hours: 9:00-11:00 Monday and Wednesday

E-mail: kun1@niu.edu

 

Classroom:  Dusable Hall 464

Date and Time:  Mondays from 3:30 to 6:10 pm

 

Course Overview

 

This seminar will explore topics related to Cambodia’s political and economic development trajectory as a post conflict society.  The seminar will explore topics such as genocide, foreign aid, corruption, economic development, democratization, human rights, regionalism and globalization, and decentralization.  The intersection of these topics is relevant to the field of comparative politics as it is to the study of Cambodia.  Cambodia has experienced a high volume of overseas development assistance and economic growth yet human security, corruption, the search for justice, and democratic development all remain challenges.

 

Course Requirements and Grading

● Final Exam (30%)

 

● Term Paper, including presentation and proposal (30%).

▪Paper Proposal

Paper proposal is worth 5%. The proposal is important because it is a road map for your research for it makes the research and writing easier. In order to avoid the problems commonly found in research papers such as being too general, too broad, and hastily written, students are required to submit a proposal of roughly 2 pages that includes the following:

1.      Title and outline

2.      3-4 paragraphs of summary that addresses these points: research question, significance of the study, theoretical framework, and working hypothesis.

3.      A list of 8 scholarly sources that you have already read. This includes journal articles and books.

 

▪Length

The paper should between 20-25 pages including citations and bibliography.

 

● Class Participation, including classroom question submissions, and leading class discussion and attendance (30%).   Students are expected to attend all class sessions.  Absences will result in a reduced grade for class participation.

● Reflection on reading: Write a one page synopsis for readings assigned for each week that highlight key ideas, insights, questions or points of disagreement from the assigned readings.  This then serves as a base for our classroom discussion (10%).

 

● Each student will be responsible for leading class discussion.  The discussant will have to submit 4-6 questions ahead of time.  Questions should relate to the materials assigned for the week and highlight points of contention or confusion—basically these are points that the discussant feels the needs to elaborate in class.  The questions should be submitted by midnight on the day before the class meeting. 

 

Required Textbooks

● David Chandler, The Tragedy of Cambodian History, (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1991).

● Evan Gottesman, Cambodia after the Khmer Rouge: Inside the Politics of Nation Building, (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2003).

● Other assigned readings will be available on course blackboard.

 

Week 1—January 11th: Introduction to the Class

Movie: “The Rice People” by Rithy Panh.

 

Week 2—January 18th: No Class Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

 

Week 3—January 25th: Cambodia and the Cold War

● David Chandler, The Tragedy of Cambodian History, pp. 1-191.

 

Week 4—February 1st: The Khmer Rouge and Genocide

● David Chandler, The Tragedy of Cambodian History, pp. 192-235; 236-272; 312-318.

● William Shawcross, Sideshow: Kissinger, Nixon and the Destruction of Cambodia (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1981), pp. 280-299.

● Alexander L. Hinton, “A Head for an Eye: Revenge in the Cambodian Genocide,” American Ethnologist, 25 (3): 352-377.

● Michael Vickery, Cambodia 1975-1982 (Boston: South End Press, 1984), pp. 27-63.

 

Week 5—February 8th: The Search for Justice

● Samantha Power, “Problem from Hell”: American and the Age of Genocide (New York: Basic Books, 2002), 1-154.

● Steve Heder, “Hun Sen and Genocide Trials in Cambodia: International Impacts, Impunity, and Justice,” in Judy Ledgerwood ed., Cambodia Emerges from the Past: Eight Essays (DeKalb, IL: Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Northern Illinois University, 2002), pp. 176-223.

● Gottesman, Cambodia After the Khmer Rouge, pp. 37-38; 60-66.

 

Week 6—February 15th: Cambodia After the Khmer Rouge

● Gottesman, Cambodia After the Khmer Rouge, pp. xx1-11; pp. 37-267.

● David Chandler, A History of Cambodia 4th ed., (Boulder: Westview Press, 2008), pp. 277-284.

 

Week 7—February 22nd: Peace Building

● Gottesman, Cambodia after the Khmer Rouge, pp. 271-358. [Read this one first]

● David Chandler, A History of Cambodia 4th ed., (Boulder: Westview Press, 2008), pp. 285-300.

● David W. Roberts, Political Transition in Cambodia 1991-1999: Power, Elitism and Democracy (Richmond: Curzon Press, 2001), pp. 6-82.

● Macalister Brown and Joseph Zasloff, Cambodia Confounds the Peacemakers 1979-1998 (Ithaca: Cornel University Press, 1998), pp. 269-300.

 

Week 8—March 1st: Nation Building and Foreign Aid

● William Easterly, The White Man’s Burden: Why the West’s Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good (London: Penguine, 2006), pp. 37-59.

Paul Collier, The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries Are Failing and What Can Be Done About It (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007), pp. 99-123.

● Caroline Hughes, Dependent Communities: Aid and Politics in Cambodia and East Timor (Ithaca: Cornel Southeast Asian Program, 2009), pp. 167-180; 135-139; 156-166.

 “Chanboreth, Ek and Sok Hach, Aid Effectiveness in Cambodia, Wolfensohn Center for Development at the Brookings Institute, Working Paper 7, December 2008. http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/rc/papers/2008/12_cambodia_aid_chanboreth/12_cambodia_aid_chanboreth.pdf.

 

Week 9—March 8th: Spring Break

 

Week 10—March 15th: Democratization and Democracy

● Phillipe Schmitter and Terry Karl, “What Democracy Is …And Is Not,” in Larry Diamond and Marc Plattner eds., Democracy: A Reader (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), pp. 3-16.

● Guillermo O’Donnell, “Delegative Democracy,” in Larry Diamond and Marc Plattner eds., Democracy: A Reader (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), pp.32-46.

● Adam Przeworski et al. “What Makes Democracies Endure?” in Larry Diamond and Marc Plattner eds., Democracy: A Reader (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), pp.86-102.

● Larry Diamond, “Thinking of Hybrid Regimes,” in Larry Diamond and Marc Plattner eds., Democracy: A Reader (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), pp.229-243.

● Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way, “International Linkage and Democratization,” in Larry Diamond and Marc Plattner eds., Democracy: A Reader (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), pp. 289-206.

 

Week 11—March 22nd: Cambodia and Democratization

● Kheang Un, “Sam Rainsy and the Sam Rainsy Party: Configuring Opposition Politics in Cambodia,” in John Kane, Haig Patapan, and Benjamin Wong eds., Dissident Democrats: The Challenge of Democratic Leadership in Asia (London: Palgrave, 2008), 105-128.

● Duncan McCargo, “Getting Away with Authoritarianism,” Journal of Democracy 16, no 4 (2005): 98-112.

● Kheang Un, “Cambodia’s 2008 Parliamentary Elections: Prospect for Opposition Politics,” Asia Pacific Bulletin No. 22, August 23, 2008.  East West Center, http://www.eastwestcenter.org/fileadmin/stored/pdfs/apb022_2.pdf.

● Steve Heder, “Hun Sen’s Consolidation: Death or Beginning of Reform?” Southeast Asian Affairs, 2005, pp. 113-130.

● Caroline Hughes, “The Politics of Gifts: Transition and Regimentation in Contemporary Cambodia,” Journal of Southeast Asian Studies 37, no. 3 (2006): 469-489.

● Judy Ledgerwood, “Patterns of CPP Political Repression and Violence During the UNTAC Period,” in Steve Heder and Judy Ledgerwood eds., Propaganda, Politics, and Violence in Cambodia: Democratic Transition under United Nations Peace-Keeping (New York: M. E. Sharpe, 1996), pp. 114-133.

 

Week 12—March 29th: Civil Society and Human Rights

● Judy Ledgerwood and Kheang Un, “Global concepts and local meaning: human rights and Buddhism in Cambodia,” Journal of Human Rights, 2, no. 4, (December, 2003): 531-550.

● Caroline Hughes, “Mystics and Militants: Democratic Reform in Cambodia,” International Politics 38, no 1 (2001): 47-64.

● Kheang Un, “State, Society and Democratic Consolidation: The Case of Cambodia,” Pacific Affairs 79, no. 2 (2006): 225-45.

● Sorpong Peou, International Democracy Assistance for Peacebuilding: Cambodia and Beyond (London: Palgrave, 2008), pp. 112-123.

● Caroline Hughes, The Political Economy of Cambodia’s Transition, 1991-2001 (London: RoutledgeCurzon, 2003), pp. 123-213.

 

Week 13—April 5th: Local Politics and Decentralization

● Judy Ledgerwood and John Vijghen, “Decision Making in Rural Khmer Villages,” in Judy Ledgerwood ed., Cambodia Emerges from the Past: Eight Essays (DeKalb: Center for Southeast Asian Studies, 2002): pp, 112-150.

● Joakim Ojendal and Kim Sedara, “Korob, Kaud Klach: In Search of Agency in Rural Cambodia,” Journal of Southeast Asian Studies 37, no 3 (October 2006): 491-550.

 David Craig and Pak Kimchoeun, “Party Financing of Local Investment Projects: Elite and Mass Patronage,” in Caroline Hughes and Kheang Un eds., Cambodia’s Economic Trasformation (Copenhagen: NIAS, forthcoming), pp. 244-271.

Peter Blunt and Mark Turner, “Decentralization and Development in a Post-Conflict Society: Commune Councils in Cambodia” Public Administration and Development 25 (2005): 75-87.

 Margaret Slocomb, “Commune Elections in Cambodia: 1981 Foundation and 2002 Reformulations,” Modern Asian Studies 38, no 2 (2004): 447-467.

 

Week 14—April 12th: Presentation of Term Paper

 

Week 15—April 19th: Presentation of Term Paper

 

Week 16—April 26th: Development, and Natural Resources

● David Collier, The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries Are Failing and What Can Be Done About It (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007), pp. 38-52.

Philippe Le Billon, “Logging in Muddy Waters: The Politics of Forest Exploitation in Cambodia,” Critical Asian Studies 34, no 4 (2002): 563-586.

Kheang Un and So Sokbunthoeun, “The Politics of Natural Resource Use,” Asian Affairs: An American Perspective 36, no 3 (2009): 123-138.

David Dapice, A SWOT Analysis of Cambodia (Phnom Penh: UNDP, 2005).

● Sophal Ear, “Sowing and Sewing Growth: The Political Economy of Rice and Garments in Cambodia,” Stanford Center for International Development Working Paper No. 384, March 30, 2009.

CRS Report for Congress: China-Southeast Asia Relations: Trends, Issues, and Implications

for the United States, 2006.  

 

Week 17—May 3rd Final Exam 4-6:40 pm