POLS 495: COMPARATIVE SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

(Catalog Title: Seminar in Current Problems)

Northern Illinois University

Department of Political Sciences

 

Spring 2006                                                                                         Prof. Lynn Kamenitsa

M 3-5:40                                                                                             Tel: 753-7053; Office: ZU 107

DuSable 464                        E-mail: Lynnkam@niu.edu

                        Office Hours:  M 11-12 &

                                 W 1:15-2:30 & by appt

 

Course Description:

This course is an examination of the broad theoretical and empirical literature on social movements.  Political scientists, like other social scientists, once relegated social movements to the fringes of the political sphere. But in the last three decades, they have increasingly become the objects of scholarly theorizing and analysis.  During the same period, social movements have become key political actors in states throughout the world.  They provide avenues for participation in democratic politics, widen access to said politics, and shaping public policy. While the social movement literature itself is interdisciplinary, our focus will be on the political aspects of these movements.  Much of the literature has asked why such movements form and why people participate in them, yet we are most concerned about their impacts on politics and vice versa. We will examine several of the major approaches to social movement research, with a particular focus on the efforts to synthesize approaches (or at least render them compatible) in the last decade.  Throughout the semester, we will consider the extent to which these models, which were largely constructed based on empirical cases in western industrialized states, are or are not appropriate for understanding social movements in other types of systems.

 

The seminar will be conducted in a discussion format.  The ideal is to generate intellectually lively and challenging discussion of the week's reading material.  The goal is to create an environment in which everyone feels free to contribute her or his own insight and analysis, as well as to question the claims of authors and other seminar participants.

 

Course Readings:

 

Required Texts:

(All texts are available at University Bookstore and Village Commons Bookstore.  They may also be available for lower prices through on-line sources, including amazon.com.)

 

Sidney Tarrow. 1998. Power in Movement. 2nd Edition. New York: Cambridge University Press.

 

Smith, Jackie and Hank Johnston eds. 2002. Globalization and Resistance: Transnational Dimensions of Social Movements. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. 

 

Additional Text (purchase strongly recommended):

Snow, David, Sarah A. Soule, and Hanspeter Kriesi, eds. The Blackwell Companion to Social Movements. 2004. Malden, MA: Blackwell publishing.  [Numerous chapters in this volume are required reading for the course. The purchase of the book, however, is not required due to its cost. Book is also on reserve at Founders Library.]

 

Additional required book chapters and articles are available on course reserve in Founders Library, via e-reserves, or via Blackboard.  The method of accessing each is listed in the syllabus.

 

Note: The reading load for the seminar is substantial, so it is imperative that students learn to budget the time devoted to reading each article/chapter and preparing the reading questions.  Each reading does not deserve the same amount of time and attention.  One goal of this seminar is to help students learn to make those distinctions and act upon them accordingly.

 

Seminar Requirements:

 

1. Preparation and Participation (30%)

This course is based on extensive reading and discussion of a wide variety of material.  It is imperative that students come to class prepared to discuss and analyze the material assigned for that week.  This means you should have read all of the materials, taken notes on them (including noting areas where you have questions or would like clarification), considered how the readings relate to one another, thought about your responses to the issues raised in each reading, and devised your own questions to stimulate group discussion.  Your notes should enable you to discuss each author (by name), her/his central points, and specific examples you want to mention from her/his work.

 

Informed participation should reflect the preparation outlined above.  Students will be assessed on how their comments, questions, and responses to other students’ comments reflect careful reading, comprehension of the material, thoughtful questioning and critiquing, and original analysis. Simply talking in seminar does not automatically constitute informed participation.   In other words, contributing to each week’s discussion is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for good participation; the quality and focus of your comments counts too. Needless to say, students who are absent from a seminar meeting are not participating. (This portion of your grade includes your discussion of others' research in the mini-conference at the end of the semester; see #4 below). 

 

Reading  Questions Students should come to class each week with two questions intended to stimulate seminar discussion about the week’s topic.  The questions might seek clarification of confusing points, highlight connections between readings, note contradictions, or make provocative observations about the readings. Asking these questions gives each student a chance to guide the weekly discussions to topics of particular interest to her/him.  I do not intend to collect the reading questions, but will begin to do so if it seems that students are not preparing them for each session.

 

2)  Short essays & oral presentations (25%)

Each student shall write two short essays (4-5 pages each). Each essay will be a critical analysis one of the weekly topics.  The point is not to summarize the week's readings, but to respond to them with thoughtful criticisms, to explore their implications, consider how they relate to issues already discussed, and to provide your own assessment of them.  These essays are to be analytical - rather than descriptive or summary - in nature.  The essay will also serve as the basis for a brief (5-8 minute) oral presentation on the topic to the seminar during the relevant week.  The purpose of the oral presentation is to introduce the issues raised in your paper and to generate class discussion (based on the assumption that all other seminar participants have already done the reading).  The oral presentation should be prepared in advance. It should NOT consist of reading your paper or stream of consciousness rambling on the topic.  You are also expected to play a role in facilitating the seminar discussion during the weeks you write short essays

 

The short essay is due in my mailbox (Zulauf 415) or e-mail box (Lynnkam@niu.edu) by noon (12:00 p.m.) on Monday before the relevant seminar meeting. Essays turned in after that, but before class begins, will be counted as one day late. Short essays will not be accepted after that week's seminar meeting. During the first two class sessions, we will decide which two weeks each student will analyze. (E-mails must be as Word attachments, please sent a test document early in the semester.)


3) Research paper & presentation  (45%)

Each student will write one research paper (25-30 pages) that examines some aspect of social movements.  The paper may have an empirical focus on a single movement (or a comparison of two movements) or focus on some aspect of social movement theory.  Empirical papers need not be based on original empirical data, but may instead utilize secondary sources. 

 

Your paper topic must be approved by the instructor in advance. Each student must schedule a consultation time with the instructor during Week 3 or 4 to discuss potential topics.  Each student must write a project proposal (1-2 pages) in which you describe the problem you plan to examine, your initial hypothesis or theory, its relationship to existing scholarship, your progress to date, and your potential sources. 

 

The overall paper grade has three components: proposal (10%), presentation (10%), final paper (80%).

 

Paper proposals due Week 6 - February 20  (2 copies)

Final papers due Week 14 - April 24 (3 copies, including those for mini-conference discussants)

 

4) Participation in the Mini-Conference

Two class meetings at the end of the term will be devoted to the oral presentation (15 minutes) of research projects.  In addition to presenting her or his own research, each student will serve as a discussant for the research of several other students.  (See also #1 & #3 above).

 

 

Course Schedule and Calendar  

 

For each week, three sets of readings are listed:

      Required Readings:  those that you must read in preparation for that week’s class meeting

      Supplementary Readings: those with which students taking the candidacy exam in comparative politics should familiarize themselves before taking that exam. They are in no way required for this course this semester.

      Recommended Readings: those that you should consult if you would like to know more about the week’s topic (for example, if your research paper deals with a related topic)

 

A guide to reading abbreviations

Tarrow = chapters in his Power in Movement book 

in Blackwell = chapters in the Blackwell Companion text

            in Smith & Johnston = chapters in their Globalization & Resistance volume

 

Any other assigned readings by these or other authors will include relevant publication and access information.  If you are unclear about what is being assigned or how to access it, please ask in person or via e-mail before the class period in which we are discussing the reading.

 

Week 1 (Jan. 16)  Martin Luther King Day -- No class meeting

Week 2  (Jan. 23)  Introduction

 

Week 3  (Jan 30)  Major Approaches and their Relationships

 

Required Readings:

Tarrow, “Introduction” and Chs. 1-4  (skim chapters 2-4)

 

Snow, Soule, & Kriesi, “Mapping the Terrain,” (Ch. 1) in Blackwell

 

Tilly, Charles, “Social Movements as Politics,” (Ch 1). In Charles Tilly. 2004. Social Movements, 1768-2004. Boulder, CO: Paradigm: 1-15. [BOOK on reserve]

 

Supplementary Readings: 

- Crist, John T.; McCarthy, John D. 1996. "If I Had a Hammer": The Changing Methodological Repertoire of Collective Behavior and Social Movements Research. Mobilization 1,1: 87-102.

- McAdam, D. 1996. Conceptual Origins, Current Problems, Future Directions. In Doug Mc Adam, John D. McCarthy, and Mayer N. Zald, eds. Comparative Perspectives on Social Movements. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press : 23-40.

 

Recommended Readings:

***Donatella Della Porta. 2002. “Comparative Politics and Social Movements.”  In Bert Klandermas and Suzanne Staggenborg, eds. Methods of Social Movement Research.  Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. (This is so highly recommended that I have put a photocopy on reserve.  Students who lack background in comparative politics may find this a useful introduction to the field.)

 

 

Week 4 (Feb. 6)  Resource Mobilization, Movement Organizations, & Networks

 

Required Readings:

On RM:

J. Craig Jenkins. 1983. "Resource Mobilization Theory and the Study of Social Movements." Annual Review of Sociology 9: 527-53. (A good review of early RM theory/works)  (Available as PDF on Blackboard or via JSTOR)

 

Edwards, Bob, and John McCarthy, “ Resources and Social Movement Mobilization” (Ch 6) in Blackwell

 

On Organizations:

Tarrow: Ch. 8

 

Clemens, Elisabeth and Debra Minkoff, “Beyond the Iron Law” (Ch 7) in Blackwell

 

On Networks:

Diani, Mario, “Networks and Participation” (Ch 15) in Blackwell.

 

Skim 1 of the following  two  articles to see how RM is applied empirically:

 

Morris, Aldon D. 1981. "Black Southern Student Sit-In Movement: An Analysis of Internal Organization."  American Sociological Review,  46, 6 (Dec.): 744-767. (Available as PDF on Blackboard or via JSTOR)

 

Robnett, Belinda. 1996. "African American Women and Leadership in the U.S. Civil Rights Movement." American Journal of Sociology 101, 6 (May): 1661-1693. (Available as PDF on Blackboard or via JSTOR)

 

Skim 1 of the following three articles/chapters for an idea of how network analysis is operationalized:

 

Osa, Maryjane. 2003. “Network in Opposition: Linking Organizations Through Activists in the Polish People’s Republic.”  In Mario Diani & Doug McAdam, eds. Social Movement and Networks: Relational Approaches to Collective Action. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Pp. 77-104. (Book on reserve)

 

Broadbent, Jeffery. 2003. “Movement in Context: Thick Networks and Japanese Environmental Protest.” In Mario Diani & Doug McAdam, eds., Social Movement and Networks: Relational Approaches to Collective Action. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Pp. 204-232. (Book on reserve) (Focus on the method and data discussion only, not his theory.  We will not discuss his theory in class)

 

Zhao, Dingxin. 1998. "Ecologies of Social Movements: Student Mobilization during the 1989 Prodemocracy Movement in Beijing" American Journal of Sociology 103, 6 (May): 1493-1529. (Available as PDF on Blackboard or via JSTOR)

 

Supplementary Readings: 

On RM:

- Mancur Olson, The Logic of Collective Action.1971.  A summary of this work and many of its critics can be found in the first eight pages of:  Pamela Oliver (1993). "Formal Models of Collective Action." Annual Review of Sociology 19: 271-300.

On Networks:

- Mario Diani & Doug McAdam, eds. 2003. Social Movement Analysis: The Network Perspective.  Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

Recommended Readings:

On RM:

- Doug McAdam, Political Process and the Development of Black Insurgency (1982), Chapter 2 (a good summary/overview of this literature)

- Chong, Dennis. Collective Action and the Civil Rights Movement. 1991.

- John McCarthy and Mayer Zald. 1977. “Resource Mobilization and Social Movements:  A Partial Theory.” American Journal of Sociology 82,6 (May ):1212-1241.  (Perhaps the key early RM work) (Available via JSTOR)

On Networks:

Passy, Florence. 2003. “Social Networks Matter. But How?” In Mario Diani & Doug McAdam, eds., Social Movement and Networks: Relational Approaches to Collective Action.  Oxford: Oxford University Press. Pp 21-48. (Consider Diani’s introductory chapter to this text if you want clarification of terms and concepts) (Book on reserve)

- Diani, Mario. 1997. “Social Movements and Social Capital: A Network Perspective on Movement Outcomes.” Mobilization 2, 2(Sept.): 129-147.

- Klandermans, Bert. 1990. "Linking the 'Old' and the 'New' Movement Networks in the Netherlands. In Russell J. Dalton and Manfred Kuechler, eds., Challenging the Political Order. New York: Oxford UP.

 

 

Week 5 (Feb. 13) New Social Movements & Collective Identity 

 

Required Readings:

On NSM:

Alberto Melucci. 1994. “A Strange Kind of Newness: What’s ‘New’ in New Social Movements?”  In New Social Movements: From Ideology to Identity. E. Laraña, H. Johnston and J. R. Gusfield, eds. Philadelphia, Temple University Press. (E-reserves) (Emphasize the first 10 pages)

 

Johnston, H., E. Laraña, et al. 1994. “Identities, Grievances, and New Social Movements. In New Social Movements: From Ideology to Identity. E. Laraña, H. Johnston and J. R. Gusfield, eds. Philadelphia, Temple University Press. Pp. 3-36. (E-reserves)

 

 

On Identity:

Hunt, Scott and Robert Benford, “ Collective Identity, Solidarity, and Commitment” (Ch 19) in Blackwell

 

Mansbridge, J. 2001. “The making of oppositional consciousness.” In  J. Mansbridge and A. Morris, eds. Oppositional Consciousness: The Subjective Roots of Social Protest. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 1-19.  (E-reserves)

 

Bernstein, Mary. 1997. "Celebration and Suppression: The Strategic Uses of Identity by the Lesbian and Gay Movement." American Journal of Sociology 103, 3 (Nov.): 531-565. (Available as PDF on Blackboard or via JSTOR) (skim)

 

Eder, Klaus. 2003. “Identity, Mobilization and democracy: An Ambivalent Relationship.” In Ibarra, Pedro, ed. Social Movements and Democracy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.  (E-reserves)

 

Supplementary Reading:

On NSM:

- Russell J. Dalton and Manfred Kuechler, eds. 1990. Challenging the Political Order: New Social and Political Movements in Western Democracies. New York: Oxford UP.

 On Identity:

- Polletta, Francesca and James M. Jasper. 2001. "Collective Identity and Social Movements." Annual Review of Sociology 27:283-305.

 

Recommended Reading:

On NSM:

- E. Laraña, H. Johnston and J. R. Gusfield, eds. New Social Movements: From Ideology to Identity. Philadelphia, Temple University Press, 1994.

- Alain Touraine. 1992. “Beyond Social Movements?” Theory, Culture & Society 9,1:125-146. (E-reserves)

- Almost anything by Alain Touraine or Alberto Melucci. Their works in the 1980s would make good introductions to the NSM approach.

On Identity:

- Taylor, V. and N. Whittier.1995. “Analytical Approaches to Social Movement Culture: The Culture of the Women's Movement.” In  H. Johnston and B. Klandermans, eds.  Social Movements and Culture. Minneapolis, MN, U of Minnesota Press: 163-187

- Mansbridge, Jane and Aldon Morris. 2001.  Oppositional Consciousness: The Subjective Roots of Social Protest. Chicago The University of Chicago Press:

 

 

Week 6  (Feb. 20)              Ideas Matter: Ideology, Framing, & Media

**** Paper proposals due ****

Required Readings:

Tarrow: Ch. 7

 

Snow, David, “Framing Processes, Ideology, and Discursive Fields” (Ch 17) in Blackwell

 

Pamela Oliver and Hank Johnston. 2000. “What a Good Idea! Ideologies and Frames in Social Movement Research,” Mobilization 5: 37-54. (E-reserves)

 

Myra Marx Ferree and David Merrill. 2004. “Hot Movements, Cold Cognition: Thinking about Social Movements in Gendered Frames.” In Goodwin and Jasper (eds.) Rethinking Social Movements, Lanham, MD: Rowan & Littlefield Publishers. (E-reserves)

 

Gamson, William. “Bystanders, Public Opinion, and the Media” (Ch 11) in Blackwell (Skim this)

 

Skim 2 of the following to see an application of framing approaches:

 

Rita Noonan. 1995. "Women Against the State: Political Opportunities and Collective Action Frames in Chile's Transition to Democracy." Sociological Forum 10: 81-111. (Available as PDF on Blackboard or via JSTOR)

 

Cadena-Roa, J. 2002. “Strategic Framing, Emotions, and Superbarrio-Mexico City's Masked Crusader.” Mobilization 7, 2: 201-216.  (E-reserves)

 

Rohlinger, Deana and David S. Meyer. 2006. “Transnational Framing of Access to Abortion in the United States, England, and Ireland.” In Lee Ann Banaszak (ed.) The US Women’s Movement in Global Perspective Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield: 197-214. (E-reserves)

 

Supplementary Readings:

- David Snow and Robert Benford. 1992. “Master Frames and Cycles of Protest.” In Aldon D. Morris and Carol McClurg Mueller, eds. Frontiers of Social Movement Theory, New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

- Robert Benford and David Snow. 2000. “Framing Processes and Social Movements: An Overview and Assessment.” Annual Review of Sociology 26: 611-639. (overview of this literature)

 

Recommended Readings:

- Westby, D. L. 2002. “Strategic Imperative, Ideology, and Frame.” Mobilization 7,3: 287-304.

- Gamson, W. A. and D. S. Meyer. 1996. “Framing Political Opportunity.” In Comparative Perspectives on Social Movements. Doug Mc Adam, John D. McCarthy, and Mayer N. Zald, eds. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press: 273 -290.

 

Week 7  (Feb. 27) Political Process: Social Movements & the State

Required Reading:

Tarrow, Chs. 5

 

McAdam, Doug.1997. “Conceptual Origins, Current Problems, and Future Directions.” In Doug McAdam, John D. McCarthy, and Mayer N. Zald, eds. Comparative Perspectives on Social Movements. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Book on reserve)

 

Jenkins, J. C. 1995. “Social Movements, Political Representation, and the State: An Agenda and Comparative Framework.” In J. C. Jenkins and B. Klandermans, eds.  The Politics of Social Protest: Comparative Perspectives On States and Social Movements. Minneapolis, MN, U of Minnesota Press. Pp. 14-35. (overview of theories)  (E-reserves)

 

Skim the following two articles as examples of applications of this approach:

 

Rucht, D. 1996. “The Impact of National Contexts on Social Movement Structures: A Cross-Movement and Cross-National Comparison.” In Doug McAdam, John D. McCarthy, and Mayer N. Zald, eds. Comparative Perspectives on Social Movements. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Pp. 185-204. (Book on reserve)

 

Schock, K. 1999. “People Power and Political Opportunities: Social Movement Mobilization and Outcomes in the Philippines and Burma.” Social Problems 46, 3: 355-375. (E-reserves)

 

Supplementary Reading:

-  Doug McAdam, Political Process and the Development of Black Insurgency (1982), Chapters 3-4

-  Tarrow, Sydney. 1997 “States and Opportunities: the Political Structuring of Social Movements.” . In Comparative Perspectives on Social Movements. Doug Mc Adam, John D. McCarthy, and Mayer N. Zald, eds. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (for an overview of the basics of political opportunities and the state)

 

Recommended Reading:

-  Elisabeth S. Clemens. 1993. “Organizational Repertoires and Institutional Change: Women's Groups and the Transformation of U.S. Politics, 1890-1920.” American Journal of Sociology  98,4 (Jan.): 755-798.

-  Lewis, Tammy. 2002. “Conservation TSMOs: Shaping the Portected Area Systems of Less Developed Countries.” In Jackie Smith and Hank Johnston, eds. Globalization and Resistance: Transnational Dimensions of Social Movements. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

 

 

Week 8  (Mar. 6) Political Process: Movement Repertoires & Repression

 

Required Readings:

Tarrow: Ch. 6

 

Taylor, Verta and Nella Van Dyke, “’Get up, Stand up’: Tactical Repertoires of Social Movements” (Ch 12) in Blackwell

 

Rucht, Dieter, “Movement Allies, Adversaries, and Third Parties” (Ch 9) in Blackwell


Della Porta, Donatella. 1997. “Social Movements and the State: Thoughts on the Policing of Protest.” In Doug Mc Adam, John D. McCarthy, and Mayer N. Zald, eds. Comparative Perspectives on Social Movements. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Book on reserve)

 

Olzak, S., M. Beasley, et al. 2003. “The Impact of State Reforms on Protest against Apartheid in South Africa.” Mobilization 8,1: 27-50.  (E-reserves) (A useful example of application.)

 

Recommended Reading:

- Donatella Della Porta and Herbert Reiter, editors. Policing Protest: The Control of Mass Demonstrations in Western Democracies. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. 1998. (On the topic of repression)

- Rasler, Karen. 1996. "Concessions, Repression, and Political Protest in the Iranian Revolution" American Sociological Review 61,1 (Feb.): 132-152. (On the topic of repression)

 

Spring Break - March 13-17

 

Week 9 (Mar. 20)  Protest Cycles

 

Required Readings:

Tarrow: Ch. 9

 

Koopmans, Ruud, “Protest in Time and Space” (Ch 2) in Blackwell

 

Whittier, Nancy, “The Consequences of  Social Movements for Each Other” (Ch. 23) in Blackwell

 

Skim the following article for an example of an application of this approach:

 

Koopmans, Ruud. 1993. "The Dynamics of Protest Waves: West Germany, 1965-1989." American Sociological Review 58:637-658. ) (Available as PDF on Blackboard or via JSTOR)

 

Recommended Reading:

- Staggenborg, S. 1998. "Social Movement Communities and Cycles of Protest: The Emergence and Maintenance of a Local Women's Movement." Social Problems 45,2: 180-204.

- Minkoff, Debra C. 1997. "The Sequencing of Social Movements." American Sociological Review 62: 779-799. ) (Available as PDF on Blackboard or via JSTOR)

 

 

 

Week 10  (Mar. 27)  Political Process: Assessments & Applications

 

Required Readings:

"Minisymposium on Social Movements." Jeff Goodwin and James M. Jasper. 1999. "Caught in a Winding, Snarling Vine: The Structural Bias of Political Process Theory." Sociological Forum 14, 1 (March): 27-136. (Goodwin/Jasper article and responses) (Access TBA)

 

Boudreau, V. 1996. “Northern Theory, Southern Protest: Opportunity Structure Analysis in Cross-National Perspective.” Mobilization 1,2: 175-190.  (E-reserves)

 

Additional readings TBA

 

Supplementary Reading:

-  Ibarra, Pedro, ed. 2003. Social Movements and Democracy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. (recent edited volume that approaches issues of social movements and democracy from several theoretical perspectives)

- Jenkins, J.C. and B. Klandermans, eds. 1995. The Politics of Social Protest: Comparative Perspectives On States and Social Movements. Minneapolis:  University of Minnesota Press.

 

Recommended Reading:

-  “Introduction” to Ibarra, Pedro, ed. 2003. Social Movements and Democracy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

-  Amenta, E. and M. P. Young.1999. "Democratic States and Social Movements: Theoretical Arguments and Hypotheses." Social Problems 46,2: 153-168.

 

 

Week 11 (April 3)    Movement Outcomes

 

Required Readings:

Tarrow: Ch 10

 

Amenta, Edwin and Neal Caren, “The Legislative, Organizational, and Beneficiary Consequences of State-Oriented Challengers” (Ch 20) in Blackwell

 

Giugni, Marco “Personal and Biographical Consequences” (Ch 21) in Blackwell (skim this)

 Earl, Jennifer, “The Cultural Consequences of Social Movements” (Ch 22) in Blackwell

 

Skim one of the following three articles:

 

Diani, Mario. 1997. “Social Movements and Social Capital: A Network Perspective on Movement Outcomes.” Mobilization 2,2 (Sept.): 129-147. (E-reserves)

Taylor, Verta and Nicole C. Raeburn. 1995. "Identity Politics as High-Risk Activism: Career Consequences for Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Sociologists." Social Problems 42:252-273. (E-reserves)

Meyer, David S. and Nancy Whittier. 1994. "Social Movement Spillover." Social Problems 41:277-298. (E-reserves)

 

Supplementary Readings:

- Meyer, David S. and Sydney Tarrow, eds. 1998. The Social Movement Society: Contentious Politics for a New Century. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

- Giugni, Marco, Doug McAdam, and Charles Tilly, eds. 1999. How Social Movements Matter. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

 

Recommended Readings:

-  Cress, D. M. and D. A. Snow. 2000. "The Outcomes of Homeless Mobilization: The Influence of Organization, Disruption, Political Mediation, and Framing." American Journal of Sociology 105,4: 1063-1104.

-  Andrews, Kenneth T. 1997.  "The Impacts of Social Movements on the Political Process: The Civil Rights Movement and Black Electoral Politics in Mississippi." American Sociological Review 62,5 (Oct.): 800-819.

-  Andrews, Kenneth T. 2001.  "Social Movements and Policy Implementation" American Sociological Review 66: 71-95.

- Giugni,  Marco. 2004. Social protest and policy change : ecology, antinuclear, and peace movements in comparative perspective. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

 

Week 12  (April 10)  Transnational Movements I

Tarrow: Ch. 11

 

Smith, Jackie and Hank Johnston, eds. 2002. Globalization and Resistance: Transnational Dimensions of Social Movements. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.  Chapter: 1

 

McCarthy, John D. 1997. “The Globalization of Social Movement Theory.”  In Jackie Smith, Charles Chatfield, and Ron Pagnucco, eds. Transnational Social Movements and Global Politics: Solidarity beyond the State.  Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press.  (E-reserves)

 

Keck, Margaret E. and Kathryn Sikkink. 1998. “Transnational Advocacy Networks in the Movement Society.” In  David S. Meyer and Sydney Tarrow, eds. 1998. The Social Movement Society: Contentious Politics for a New Century. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. (E-reserves)

 

Supplementary Readings:

- Keck, Margaret E. and Kathryn Sikkink. 1998.  Activists Beyond Borders : Advocacy Networks in International Politics. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

- Bandy, Joe and Jackie Smith, eds. 2005. Coalitions across borders : transnational protest and the neoliberal order Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield.

 


Recommended Readings:

-  Smith, Jackie and Hank Johnston, eds. 2002. Globalization and Resistance: Transnational Dimensions of Social Movements. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.  Chapters: 2,3, 5

-  Smith, Jackie Charles Chatfield, and Ron Pagnucco, eds 1997. In Transnational Social Movements and Global Politics: Solidarity beyond the State.  . Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press.

- della Porta, Donatella and Sidney Tarrow, eds. 2004. Transnational Protest and Global Activism. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

 

Week 13 (April 17)  Transnational Movements II

 

Required Readings:

Smith, Jackie, “Transnational Processes and Movements” (Ch 14) in Blackwell

 

Smith, Jackie and Hank Johnston, eds. 2002. Globalization and Resistance: Transnational Dimensions of Social Movements. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.  Chapters: 2-8

 

Week 14  (April 24) Transnational Movements III:                         ****Papers due****

Globalization, Violence, and the Future

 

Required Readings:

Tarrow: Conclusion

 

Smith, Jackie and Hank Johnston, eds. 2002. Globalization and Resistance: Transnational Dimensions of Social Movements. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.  Chapters: 9-13

 

Supplementary Readings:

- Tarrow, Sidney. 2000. Transnational Contention.

 

Recommended Readings:

-McAdam, Doug, Sidney Tarrow, and Charles Tilly. 2001. Dynamics of Contention. New York: Cambridge University Press.

 

Week 15   (May 1) - Research Presentations - Mini Conference

 

Finals Week  (May 8, 4-5:50 p.m.)  Research Presentations - Mini Conference

 

_________________________________________________________________________

Sample Questions for Comprehensive Exams

 

Students who will be taking comparative politics candidacy exam can expect the following types of questions from this course.  These are only examples of the types of questions that might appear on exams.

 

1. Many scholars who study social movements have drawn their cases from liberal western democracies.  This has raised questions for comparativists about how well concepts “travel” and how appropriate they are for understanding social movements in developing countries or communist systems.  In your essay, examine the strengths and weaknesses of the major approaches to the study of social movements (classical approaches, resource mobilization, new social movements, and political process approach) as they apply to such conceptual traveling?  Make reference to specific authors to support your conclusions.

 

2. Analysis of social movements has been plagued with the issues of how to measure movement outcomes generally and, more specifically, how movements impact politics.  After providing an overview of the challenges that scholars of social movements face in assessing outcomes, provide a comparison to the challenges faced by other political science scholars who study comparative politics.   To what extent are these challenges parallel?  Do certain characteristics of social movements (as a political phenomenon) present different challenges than those faced by comparativists studying other political phenomena?

 

3. Tarrow advocates a version of the political process approach for understanding social movements as political actors.  In what ways is his approach similar to and different from more traditional (for example, institutional) political science approaches, which would examine social movements as just another interest group?  What are the criticisms of the political process leveled by social movement scholars who use other approaches?  Finally, provide your own assessment of the utility of political process approaches generally and Tarrow’s specifically?

 

4. To what extent and in what ways are existing models for analyzing social movements adequate for understanding the phenomenon of transnational activism?  What, if any, new challenges do transnational movements present to our existing tools for understanding social movements in comparative politics?

 

5. One could argue that the political process approach is the dominant approach in the study of social movements today and that it encompasses other approaches. Scholars of social movements disagree about the extent to which this is true and/or desirable.  Trace the evolution of this approach and elaborate on its main strengths and weaknesses (according to proponents and critics).  Provide your own assessment of its utility as an overarching approach for studying social movements.

 

 

 

 

ACADEMIC HONESTY & PLAGIARISM:

No paper (or other written assignment or exam) submitted for another course or written by another person will be accepted.  Plagiarism - presenting the thoughts or words of others as if they were your own - will not be tolerated.  You must credit all of the sources from which you obtain data, information, ideas, or language with a full and accurate citation (and quotation marks, when appropriate).  This includes readings assigned for this course. Plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty can result in an automatic "F" for the course and even expulsion from the University (see the Student Judicial Code). Criteria for these offenses are described in the Student Judicial Code and the Graduate Catalog. 

 

Statement Concerning Students with Disabilities:  Under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, NIU is committed to making reasonable accommodations for persons with documented disabilities. Students with disabilities that may have some impact on their coursework and for which they may require accommodations should notify the Center for Access-Ability Resources (CAAR) on the fourth floor of the Health Services Building. CAAR will assist students in making appropriate accommodations with course instructors. It is important that CAAR and instructors be informed of any disability-related needs during the first two weeks of the semester.

 

Department of Political Science Web Site:  This up-to-date, central source of information will assist students in contacting faculty and staff, reviewing course requirements and syllabi, exploring graduate study, researching career options, tracking department events, and accessing important details related to undergraduate programs and activities. To reach the site, go to http://polisci.niu.edu