SYLLABUS

POLITICAL SCIENCE 530

Seminar in Biopolitical Theory

Spring 2005

Instructor:  James Schubert (Jim)

Office ZU 306 – 815-753-9675

Email: t70jns1@wpo.cso.niu.edu

Hours:  T & W 1-2

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES

 

            This seminar is the required course for students with an area of study concentration in Politics and the Life Sciences.  It presents a survey of the theoretical and methodological approaches in political science known as biopolitics.  Biopolitics is a term that embraces behavioral research in political science, studies in public policy and inquiry into fundamental problems of political philosophy.

 

            Theoretical approaches include ethology, sociobiology or evolutionary psychology and cognitive neuroscience.  Practical concerns in behavioral biopolitics include problems of authority, dominance, leadership, decision making and political judgment, socialization and mass attitudes, conflict and cooperation, political development and ethnic nationalism, among others.  These concerns are explored in relation to the diverse fields of political science, including legislative, judicial and presidential politics, elections and campaigns, political behavior, international relations, public administration, comparative politics and political theory.  Biopolicy and political development linkages are also considered with respect to problems of public health and nutrition, epidemic disease, famine, and drugs.

 

The objective of this seminar is to provide a broad based survey of theory and research across these different problem areas of biopolitics.  This is a foundation  seminar for more specialized courses in behavior, policy and political theory in biopolitics and is a relevant complement to programs of study in other areas of political and social science.

 

READINGS

 

            The only formal textbook for this seminar is Marcus, et al (2000) Affective Intelligence.  All other readings will either be on library reserve or downloadable via JSTORE or electronic reserves.

 

REQUIREMENTS

 

(1)   a research design paper of 10-12 pages due after Spring break --  Outline and format to be explained by the instructor on 2/2/05. – 20%

(2)   Major term research paper of about 20pp. – 50% (due last class period)

(3)   Participation and presentations of assigned readings --10%

(4)   Take home final exam – 20%

 

 

TOPICAL OUTLINE

 

Date

 

Week & Topic

 

 

 

 

 

18-Jan

 

1Brief Meeting Bonnicksen& Tweed

 

 

 

25-Jan

 

2 Introductory/ Overview Readings  w/ Mike Tweed

 

1-Feb

 

3 Ethology[Schubert returns]

 

 

 

 

8-Feb

 

4 Sociobiology

 

 

 

 

 

15-Feb

 

5 Neuroscience

 

 

 

 

 

23-Feb

 

6 Leadership

 

 

 

 

 

2-Mar

 

7 Dominance

 

 

 

 

 

9-Mar

 

8 Aggression & Conflict

 

 

 

 

23-Mar

 

9 Cooperation Coalitions & Altruism [research design due]

 

6-Apr

 

10: Appearance Stereotypes &  Phenotype: Age & Sex

 

13-Apr

 

11 Appearance Stereotypes &  Phenotype: Attractiveness& Ethnicity

20-Apr

 

12 Emotion & Political judgment

 

 

 

27-Apr

 

13 Stress, Health & Personality

 

 

 

4-May

 

14 Public Health & Political Development

 

 

 

11-May

 

15 Evolutionary Theory and Ethnic Nationalism[

 

 

 

 

take home final exam due]

 

 

 

 

 

 

READINGS

 

INTRODUCTION & OVERVIEW

 

 

1.       “Biology and Politics: Political, Practical and Philosophical Issues” A. Somit and M. Watts

2.       “Contributions of Biopolitics to Mainstream Political Science: Implications for Political Philosophy” R. Hartigan

3.       “Biology and Public Administration” J. Losco

4.       “Biopolitics and the Study of International Relations: Implications, Results and Perspectives” V. Falger

 

[previous 4 are in Somit and Peterson (1994)  Research in Biopolitics:  Biopolitics and the Mainstream  JAI Press.

5.       “The New Darwinian Naturalism in Political Theory” L. Arnhart [in Am. Pol. Sci Rev. (1995)

 

THEORETICAL APPROACHES—ETHOLOGY

 

1.       Eibl-Eibesfeldt, I. “Human Ethology: Concepts and Implications for the Sciences of Man” 

2.       Schubert, G. “Primate Politics”

3.       Schubert, G. “Political Ethology”

4.       Peterson and Somit, “Research Methods Derived from the Life Sciences”

5.       Salter, F. “Drawn by the Light: Visual Recording Methods in Biopolitics”

6.       Schubert, J. “Verbal, Vocal and Visual Aspects of Political Speech”

 

THEORETICAL APPROACHES—SOCIOBIOLOGY

 

1.       Hamilton, W.D. “The Genetical Evolution of Social Behavior” in Caplan (1978) The Sociobiology Debate

2.       Trivers, R.L. “The Evolution of Reciprocal Altruism” in Caplan (1978)

3.       Johnson, G. “In the Name of the Fatherland” (1987) International Political Science Review

4.       Irons, W. “Natural Selection, Adaptation, and Human Social Behavior” in Chagnon and Irons, Evolutionary Biology and Human Social Behavior

5.       Losco, J. “Sociobiology and Political Science” in Somit and Peterson (ed) Research in Biopolitics, vol. 4, pp. 151-178

6.       Schubert, J. and M. Tweed. “Ethnic Diversity, Population Size, and Charitable Giving at the Local Level in the United States” in F. Salter (ed) Welfare, Ethnicity and Altruism

 

THEORETICAL APPROACHES—NEUROSCIENCE

 

  1. Marcus, Chapt. 1
  2. Marcus, Chapt. 2
  3. Marcus, Chapt. 3
  4. Cacioppo & Visser (2003) in Pol. Psych 24,4:647-656
  5. Morris, Squires, Taber & Lodge(2003) in Pol. Psych 24,4:727-746
  6. Raichle (2003) in Pol. Psych 24,4: 759-764