Monday, 6:00-8:40                                                                                                      POLS 573N

Office hours: T 2:15-3:15, W 5-6                                                                                 Spring 2004

dunger@niu.edu 753 7042                                                                                           Professor Unger

 

 

Foreign Area Politics: Thailand

 

This course’s intensive study of Thai politics aims at giving students a deep familiarity with the English language literature on the subject.  The readings cover the issues necessary to understand politics in Thailand.  While only some of the readings are explicitly comparative, students should try to address all the readings with a comparative framework in mind.  The assignments are designed to maximize student contributions to discussion of the readings and to develop a paper suitable for presentation.

 

Note: Students taking the candidacy exam in comparative politics will be responsible for all the readings listed on this syllabus under the headings supplementary and required.  Please also note the questions listed at the end of this syllabus.  These questions are representative of the kinds of questions students will be expected to be able to answer when taking the candidacy exam.

 

Required texts:

 

Kevin Hewison, ed., Political Change in Thailand (Routledge, 1997)

Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (NIAS, 2002)

 

The required readings for the course average less than120 pages a week (with readings marked “skim” discounted at 25%.)  Few of the readings are highly abstract so students should find the load manageable.  The load is quite uniform, but heavier in early and lighter in late April.  Assigned readings not from the two required texts are mostly available online from the library.  A few readings, however, will be available only in print at the library reserves desk.

 

Requirements:

 

            -two class presentations of readings, 10% each                         20%

            -three five-page papers analyzing a week’s readings, 10% each 30%

            -final exam (short answer questions and one long essay)                        15%

            -command of readings as reflected in class contributions                        15%

            -20-page comparative papers                                                               20%

prepare for presentation at International Thai Studies Conference, Council on Thai Studies, NIU Southeast Asian Studies Student Conference, or professional conferences such as Association of Asian Studies, American Political Science Association, International Studies Association

 

INTRODUCTION

 

January 12, Introduction to course themes and assignments

 

January 26, Analytical approaches in the study of comparative politics and case selection

 

            Required readings:

-Andrew Bennett and Alexander George, “Integrating Comparative and Within-Case Analysis: Typological Theory,”

-Mark Irving Lichbach, “Social Theory and Comparative Politics“ in Irving and Alan S. Zuckerman, eds., Comparative Politics (Cambridge University Press, 1997) 239-76

-Neil A. Englehart, Culture and Power in Traditional Siamese Government (Cornell SEAP, 2001) pp.19-53

-Jane Bunnag, “Loose Structure: Fact or Fancy?” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.133-52

-James C. Scott, “Corruption in Thailand,” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Cambridge, Mass.: Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.294-316

-Kamol Somvichian, “The Thai Political Culture and Political Development,” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Cambridge, Mass.: Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.153-69

-Lucien M. Hanks, “Merit and Power in the Thai Social Order,” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.95-113

-Larry Diamond, Consolidating Democracy (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999) pp.163-217 (skim)

 

Suggested readings:

-James C. Scott, The Moral Economy of the Peasant (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1976) pp.35-55

 

February 2, Elements of traditional Thai polities

 

Required readings:

-Peter A. Jackson, “Withering center, flourishing margins: Buddhism’s changing political roles,” in Kevin Hewison, ed., Political Change in Thailand (Routledge, 1997) pp.75-93

-James Ockey, “Civil Society and Street Politics: Lessons from the 1950s,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.107-24

-Sulak Sivaraksa, “The crisis of Siamese identity,” in Craig J. Reynolds, National Identity and its Defenders, Thailand Today (Silkworm, 2002) pp.33-48

-Hans-Dieter Bechstedt, “Identity and authority in Thailand,” Craig J. Reynolds, National Identity and its Defenders, Thailand Today (Silkworm, 2002) pp.238-61

-Philip Hirsch, “What is the Thai village?,” in Craig J. Reynolds, National Identity and its Defenders, Thailand Today (Silkworm, 2002) pp.262-76

-Akin Rabibhadena, “The organization of Thai society in the early Bangkok period, 1782-1873,” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.27-41

-J.L. Taylor, “Embodiment, Nation, and Religio-Politics in Thailand,” South East Asia Research, 9:2, 2001, pp.129-47

           

            Supplemental readings:

-John L.S. Girling, Thailand, Society and Politics (Cornell, 1981) pp.17-60

-Joseph J. Wright, Jr., The Balancing Act, A History of Modern Thailand (Asia Books, 1991) pp.17-32, 59-104, 184-96

 

February 9, The military and the bureaucratic polity

           

            20-minute practice exam at the start of class

            Required readings:

- Chai-Anan Samudavanija, “Old soldiers never die, they are just bypassed: The military, bureaucracy, and globalisation,” in Kevin Hewison, ed., Political Change in Thailand (Routledge, 1997) pp.42-57

-Yoshihara Kunio, The Nation and Economic Growth, the Philippines and Thailand (Oxford, 1994) pp.147-56, 188-91, 220-33

-William J. Siffin, “The Essential Character of the Contemporary Bureaucracy,” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.337-55

-David A.Wilson, “Political tradition and Political Change in Thailand,” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.281-93

-Fred Riggs, “The bureaucratic polity as a working system,” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.356-74

-M. Ladd Thomas, “The perceived impact of communist Indochina on Thailand’s  security,” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.397-414

 

Supplemental readings:

-William H. Overholt, “Thailand: A Moving Equilibrium,” in Ansil Ramsay and Wiwat Mungkandi, eds., Thailand-U.S. Relations; Changing Political, Strategic, and Economic Factors (Berkeley: Institute of East Asian Studies, 1988) pp.155-94

-Suchit Bunbongkarn, The Military in Thai Politics, 1981-86 (ISEAS, 1987) pp.9-76

 

 

 

 

 

February 16, Local government in Thailand

 

            Required readings:

-Neil A. Englehart, Culture and Power in Traditional Siamese Government (Cornell SEAP, 2001) pp.55-82

-James Ockey, “The Rise of Local Power in Thailand: Provincial Crime, Elections and the Bureaucracy,” McVey, ed., Money and Power in Provincial Thailand (University of Hawaii, 2000) 74-96

 -Daniel Arghiros, “Political Reform and Civil Society at the Local Level: Thailand’s Local Government Reforms,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.223-46

-Charles Keyes, “Local Leadership in Rural Thailand,” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.197-228

-Benedict Anderson, “Murder and Progress in Modern Siam,” New Left Review, 81:2, 1990, pp.33-48

 

Supplemental readings:

-Nishizaki Yoshinori, “Provincializing Thai Politics,” Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, 1:1, March 2002

-Daniel Arghiros, “The Local Dynamics of the ‘New Political Economy’: A District Business Association and Its Role in Electoral Politics,” McVey, ed., Money and Power in Provincial Thailand (University of Hawaii, 2000) 123-53

-Chandranuj Mahakanjana,

-Akiko Sawamoto, “Cultural Dimensions of Regional Development: A Study of the Northeast Region of Thailand,” Regional Development Dialogue, 22:2, 2001, pp.198-211

-Parichart Chotiya, “The changing role of provincial business in the Thai political economy,” in Kevin Hewison, ed., Political Change in Thailand (Routledge, 1997) pp.251-64

 

Suggested readings:

-Bruce Missingham, “Local bureaucrats, power and participation: A study of two village schools in the Northeast,”in Kevin Hewison, ed., Political Change in Thailand (Routledge, 1997) pp.149-62

 

February 23, The 1997 constitution

 

            Required readings:

-David Murray, Angels and Devils (White Orchid Press, 1996) pp.257-69

-Neil A. Englehart, “Democracy and the Thai Middle Class: Globalization, Modernization, and Constitutional Change,” Asian Survey, 43:2, 2003, pp.253-79

-Amitav Acharya, “Southeast Asia’s Democratic Moment,” Asian Survey, 39:3, 1999, pp.418-32

-Duncan McCargo, “Security, Development and Political Participation in Thailand: Alternative Currencies of Legitimacy,” Contemporary Southeast Asia, 24:1, 2002, pp.50-67

-Alex M. Mutebi, “Thailand in 2002: Political Consolidation amid Economic Uncertainties,” Asian Survey, 43:1, pp.101-12

-Michael Connors, “Framing the ‘People’s Constitution,’” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.37-56

-Sombat Chantornvong, “The 1997 Constitution and the Politics of Electoral Reform,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.203-222

 

            Supplemental readings:

-Michael J. Montesano, “Thailand in 2000: Shifting Politics, Dragging Economy, Troubled Border,” Asian Survey, 41:1, 2001, pp.171-80

-Ji Giles Ungpakorn, “From Tragedy to Comedy: Political Reform in Thailand,” Journal of Contemporary Asia, 32:2, 2002, pp.191-205

-Saitip Sukatipan, “Thailand, the Evolution of Legitimacy,” in Muthiah Alagappa, ed., Political Legitimacy in Southeast Asia (Stanford University Press, 1995) pp.193-223

-William F. Case, “Thai Democracy, 2001: Out of Equilibrium,” Asian Survey, 41:3, 2001, pp.525-47

 

March 1, Contemporary bureaucracy and the monarchy

 

            Required readings:

-Danny Unger, “Principals of the Thai State,” in Ben Ross Schneider and Blanca Heredia, eds., Reinventing Leviathan, The Politics of Administrative Reform in Developing Countries (North-South Center Press, 2003) pp.181-210

-Mark Turner, “Choosing Items from the Menu, New Public Management in Southeast Asia,” International Journal of Public Administration 25:12, 2002, 1493-1512

-Kobkua Suwannathat-Pian, “The Monarchy and Constitutional Change Since 1972,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.57-72

-His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej, Biography of a Pet Dog, The Story of Tongdaeng (Bangkok: Amarin Printing and Publishing, 2002) pp.46-61

-James Ockey, “Thailand: The Struggle to Redefine Civil-Military Relations,” in Muthiah Alagappa, ed., Coercion and Governance, the Declining Political Role of the Military in Asia (Stanford University Press, 2001) pp.187-208

-Barbara Nunberg, “Civil Service Quality after the Crisis: A View of Five Asian Cases,” Asian Journal of Political Science, 10:2, 2002, pp.1-20

 

Supplemental readings:

-Bidhya Bowornwathana, “Thailand: Bureaucracy Under Coalition Government,” John Burns and Bidhya eds., Civil Service Systems in Asia (Edward Elgar, 2001)

-Pasuk Phongpaichit and Chris Baker, Thailand, Economy and Politics (Oxford, 1995) pp.211-43

 

            Suggested readings:

            -William Stevenson, The Revolutionary King (London: Constable and Co., 1999)

 

March 15, Thai parties and elections

           

Required readings:

-Allen Hicken, “Parties, Policy and Patronage: Governance and Growth in Thailand,” in J.E.L. Campos, ed., Corruption: The Boom and Bust of East Asia (Manila: Ateneo de Manila Press, 2001)

-Junhan Lee, “Primary Causes of Asian Democratization: Dispelling Conventional Myths,” Asian Survey, 42:6, 2002, pp.821-37

-Duncan McCargo, “Populism and Reformism in Contemporary Thailand,” South East Asia Research, 9:1, 2001, pp.89-107

-Aurel Croissant, “Majoritarian and Consensus Democracy, Electoral Systems, and Democratic Consolidation,” Asian Perspective, 26:2, 2002, pp.5-39

-James Ockey, “Change and Continuity in the Thai Political Party System,” Asian Survey, 43:4, 2003, pp.663-80

-N. Ganesan, “Appraising Democratic Developments in Postauthoritarian States: Thailand and Indonesia,” Asian Affairs: An American Review, 28:1, 2001, pp.3-17

-Benedict R. Anderson, “Election and participation in three Southeast Asian countries,” in R.H. Taylor, ed., The politics of elections in Southeast Asia (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996) pp.12-33

 

            Supplementary readings:

-Suchit Bunbongkarn, “Elections and democratization in Thailand,” in R.H. Taylor, ed., The politics of elections in Southeast Asia (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996) pp.245-64

-Paul Chambers,

-Ruth McVey, “Of Greed and Violence, and Other Signs of Progress,” McVey, ed., Money and Power in Provincial Thailand (University of Hawaii, 2000), pp.1-29

-Anek Laothamatas, “A Tale of Two Democracies: Conflicting Perceptions of Elections and Democracy in Thailand,” in R.H. Taylor, ed., The Politics of Elections in Southeast Asia (New York: Cambridge University Press, New York, 1996) 201-23

-Anusorn Limmanee, “Thailand,” in Wolfgang Sachsendroder and Ulrike E. Frings, eds., Political Party Systems and Democratic Development in East and Southeast Asia, Volume I (Brookfield USA: Ashgate, 1998) pp. 403-48

-Surin Maisrikrod, “The Making of Thai Democracy: A Study of Political Alliances Among the State, the Capitalists, and the Middle Class,” in Anek Laothamtas, ed., Democratization in Southeast and East Asia (Bangkok: Silkworm Books, 1997) pp.141-66

-Robert B. Albritton, “Political Parties and Elections in Thailand in an Era of Globalization: No Longer a Semi-Democracy,”

 

March 22, Civic associations, NGOs, and civil society

 

            Required readings:

-Andrew Brown, “Locating working-class power,” in Kevin Hewison, ed., Political Change in Thailand (Routledge, 1997) pp.163-78

-Philip Hirsch, “The politics of environment: Opposition and legitimacy,” in Kevin Hewison, ed., Political Change in Thailand (Routledge, 1997) pp.179-94

-Johannes Dragsbaek Schmidt, “Democratization and Social Welfare in Thailand,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.91-106

-Somchai Phatharathanaunth, “Civil Society and Democratization in Thailand: A Critique of Elite Democracy,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.125-42

-Philippe Doneys, “Political Reform through the Public Sphere: Women’s Groups and the Fabric of Governance,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.163-82

-Naruemon Thabchumpon, “NGOs and Grassroots Participation in the Political Reform Process,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.183-202

-Ukrist Pathmanand, “Globalization and Democratic Development in Thailand: The New Path of the Military, Private Sector, and Civil Society,” Contemporary Southeast Asia, 23:1, 2001, pp.24-42

 

Supplementary readings:

 -Walden Bello, Shea Cunningham, Li Kheng Poh, A Siamese Tragedy (White Lotus, 1998) pp.1-9, 175-205

- Pasuk Phongpaichit and Chris Baker, Thailand, Economy and Politics (Oxford, 1995) pp.367-94

-James P. LoGerfo, “Beyond Bangkok: The Provincial Middle Class in the 1992 Protests,” McVey, ed., Money and Power in Provincial Thailand (University of Hawaii, 2000) 221-70

-Chai-anan Samudavanija, “State-Identity Creation, State-Building and Civil Society,” in Craig J. Reynolds, National Identity and its Defenders, Thailand Today (Silkworm, 2002) pp.49-70

            -John Girling, Interpreting Development (Cornell SEAP, 1996) pp.43-76

 

Suggested readings:

-Sinith Sittirak, The Daughters of Development (Zed Books, 1998) pp.21-75

 

March 29, The media, corruption, and miscellaneous ills

 

            Required readings:

-Thitinan Pongsudhirak, “Thailand’s media: Whose watchdog?” in Kevin Hewison, ed., Political Change in Thailand (Routledge, 1997) pp.217-32

-Duncan McCargo, Politics and the Press in Thailand (Garuda Press, 2000) pp.1-42

-Pasuk Phongpaichit and Sungsidh Piriyarangsan, Corruption and Democracy in Thailand (Bangkok: Silkworm Books, 1994) pp.1-25

-Pasuk Phongpaichit, Sungsidh Piriyarangsan, and Nualnoi Treerat, Guns Girls Gambling Ganja, Thailand’s Illegal Economy and Public Policy (Bangkok: Silkworm Books, 1998) pp.155-214 (skim)

 

-Linda Y.C. Lim and Aaron Stern, “State Power and Private Profits: Review Essay on the Political Economy of Corruption in Southeast Asia,” Asia-Pacific Economic Literature

 

Supplementary readings:

-Rosalind C. Morris, “Failures of Domestication: Speculations on Globality, Economy, and the Sex of Excess in Thailand,” Differences, 13:1, 2002, pp.45-76

-Annette Hamilton, “Rumours, Foul Calumnies and the Safety of the State,” in Craig J. Reynolds, National Identity and its Defenders, Thailand Today (Silkworm, 2002) pp.277-307

-Ubonrat Siriyuvasak, “Regulation, Reform and the Question of Democratising the Broadcast Media in Thailand,” Javnost/The Public, 8:2, 2001, pp.89-108

 

April 5, The Thai economy: go-go globalization

 

            Required readings:

- Pasuk and Chris, Thailand’s Boom! (Silkworm, 1996) pp.28-55

-Richard Doner and Ansil Ramsay, “Competitive Clientelism and Economic Growth: The Case of Thailand,” in Sylvia Maxfield and Ben Ross Schneider, eds., Business and the State in Developing Countries (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1997) 237-76

-Laurids S. Lauridsen, “Struggling with Globalization in Thailand: Accumulation, Learning, or Market Competition,” South East Asia Research, 10:2, 2002, pp.155-83

-Jasper Goss and David Burch, “From Agricultural Modernisation to Agri-Food Globalisation: The Waning of National Development in Thailand,” Third World Quarterly, 22:6, 2001, pp.969-86

-Danny Unger, Building Social Capital in Thailand (Cambridge, 1998), pp.83-108

 

            Supplemental:

-Paul Handley, “More of the same?  Politics and business,” in Kevin Hewison, ed., Political Change in Thailand (Routledge, 1997) pp.94-113

-Yoshihara Kunio, The Nation and Economic Growth, the Philippines and Thailand (Oxford, 1994) on the Chinese and foreign capital, and government regulation of the economy, pp.15-21, 32-36, 41-53, 75-88

-Laurids Lauridsen, Industrial policies, political institutions and industrial development in Thailand 1959-1991

-Robert J. Muscat, The Fifth Tiger, A Study of Thai Development Policy (M.E. Sharpe, 1994) pp.86-127, 170-222

-Suehiro Akira, Capital Accumulation in Thailand, 1855-1985 (The Center for East Asian Studies, 1989) pp.178-272

-Richard Doner and Anek Laothamatas, “Thailand: Economic and Political Gradualism,” in Stephan Haggard and Steven Webb, eds., Voting for Reform: Democracy, Political Liberalization, and Economic Adjustment (New York: Oxford University Press,

 

Suggested readings:

-Gustav Ranis and Syed Akhtar Mahmood, The Political Economy of Development Policy Change (Blackwell, 1992), Ch. 5, the Philippines and Thailand

-Peter G. Warr and Bhanupong Nidhiprabha, Thailand’s Macroeconomic Miracle (World Bank, 1996) pp.19-28, 228-236

- Laurids Lauridsen, Policies and institutions of industrial deepening and upgrading in Thailand I—the basic industry strategy in petrochemicals

-Laurids Lauridsen, Policies and institutions of industrial deepening and upgrading in Thailand II—the supporting industry policy with particular emphasis on the downstream plastic parts and mould industries

 

 

April 12, The 1997 economic collapse

 

            Required readings:

-Pasuk Phongpaichit and Chris Baker, Thailand’s Crisis (Silkworm, 2000) pp.14-106 (skim)

-Scott B. MacDonald, “Transparency in Thailand’s 1997 Economic Crisis,” Asian Survey, 38:7, July 1998

-William H. Overholt, “Asia’s Continuing Crisis,” Survival, 44:1, 2002, pp.97-114

-Kasian Tejapira, “Post-Crisis Economic Impasse and Political Recovery in Thailand: The Resurgence of Economic Nationalism,” Critical Asian Studies, 34:3, 2002, pp.323-56

-Andrew MacIntyre, “Institutions and Investors: The Politics of the Economic Crisis in Southeast Asia,” International Organization, 55:1, 2002, pp.81-122

-Chris Dixon, “The Causes of Thai Economic Crisis: The Internal Perspective,” Geoforum, 32:1, 2001, pp.47-60

-Peter Warr, “Thailand’s Non-Recovery,” Southeast Asian Affairs, 29, 2002, pp.326-42

-Linda Lim, “Whose ‘Model’ Failed? Implications of the Asian Economic Crisis,” The Washington Quarterly, 21:3, 1998, pp.25-36

 

            Supplemental readings:

-Danny Unger, “Thailand: What Goes Up…” in Leslie Elliott Armijo, ed., Financial Globalization and Democracy in Emerging Markets (Palgrave, 2001) pp.276-300

-Xiaoke Zhang, “Political Structures and Financial Liberalization in Pre-Crisis East Asia,” Studies in Comparative International Development, 38:1, 2003, pp.64-92

-Aseem Prakash, “The East Asian Crisis and the Globalization Discourse,” Review of International Political Economy, 8:1, 2001, pp.119-46

 

April 19, Regions in Thailand

 

            Required readings:

-David Martin Jones and Mike Lawrence Smith, “From Konfrontasi to Disintegrasi: ASEAN and the Rise of Islamism in Southeast Asia,” Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, 25, 2002, pp.343-56

-Barry Desker, “Islam and society in South-east Asia after 11 September,” Australian Journal of International Affairs, 56:3, 2002, pp.383-94

-Andrew Tan, “Armed Muslim Separatist Rebellions in Southeast Asia: Persistence, Prospects, and Implications,” Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, 23, 2000, 267-88

-Peter Chalk, “Separatism and Southeast Asia: the Islamic Factor in Southern Thailand, Mindanao, and Aceh,” Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, 24, 2001, pp.241-69

-Kevin Hewison, “Responding to Economic Crisis: Thailand’s Localism,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.143-62

 

            Supplemental readings:

-Moshe Yegar, Between Integration and Secession, The Muslim Communities of the Southern Philippines, Southern Thailand, and Western Burma/Myanmar (Lexington, 2002)

-Zachary Abuza, Militant Islam in Southeast Asia: Crucible of Terror (Boulder: Lynne Reinner, 2003)

 

            Suggested readings:

-Charles F. Keyes, “Cultural Diversity and National Identity in Thailand,” in Michael E. Brown and Sumit Ganguly, eds., Government Policies and Ethnic Relations in Asia and the Pacific (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1997) pp.197-232

 

April 26, Thaksin: public policies and political changes

 

            20-page paper due in class

Required readings:

-Duncan McCargo, “Democracy under Stress in Thaksin’s Thailand,” Journal of Democracy, 13:4, 2002, pp.112-26

-Darryl S.L. Jarvis, “Problems and Prospects in Thaksin’s Thailand,” Asian Survey, 42:2, 2002, pp.297-319

-John Funston, “Thailand: Thaksin Fever,” Southeast Asian Affairs, 29, 2002, pp.305-25

-Duncan McCargo, “Thailand’s January 2001 General Elections: Vindicating Reform?” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.247-60

-Michael J. Montesano, “Thailand in 2001: Learning to Live with Thaksin?” Asian Survey, 42:1, 2002, pp.90-99

 

May 3, final exam, 6-7:50

 

 

Representative questions for the candidacy exam in comparative politics: