POLS 469/573K

TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS:

DEMOCRATIC CONSOLIDATION

Spring 2004, DuSable 464: TTh 9:30-10:45 a.m.

Gregory D. Schmidt Office Hours: TTh 3:30 – 4:30

Office: Zulauf 308 & by appointment

Phone: 753-7058 Email:gschmidt@niu.edu

Latin America provides an ideal setting in which to compare experiences with democracy and democratic institutions. Although the nations of the region are by no means clones of their Iberian mother countries, their histories and political cultures are more similar than those of any other major region of the world in which democracy prevails. Thus, many, if not most, of the significant differences in the functioning of Latin American political systems are attributable to institutional variables.

The first half of the course provides background on the region, introduces important concepts, and analyzes specific institutional variables that affect democratic governance: electoral and party systems, patterns of executive-legislative relations, and institutions of horizontal and vertical accountability. During the second half of the course, we will examine the recent experiences of five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, Venezuela, Argentina, Peru, and Brazil. Costa Rica has the longest continuous democracy in Latin America, one that is still solidly in place though not without its share of challenges. In contrast, Venezuela has a longstanding but seriously troubled democracy, and Argentina is perhaps the greatest democratic underachiever in the hemisphere, if not the world. Peru and Brazil are countries with glaring socioeconomic inequities, weak democratic traditions, and inchoate party systems.

Registered auditors are welcome in the class. Please see point 7 below.

Please Note: This course has been designed for the 400 level, but I am also offering it at the 500 level in order to facilitate graduate registration. (The department recently approved increases in the number of 400-level courses that may be taken by M.A. students. Once these increases are in place, this course will be offered as 469 only.)

Warning: If you have had difficulty with 100, 200, or 300-level courses at NIU, you will not do well in this course. Undergraduate students should have at least junior standing, POLS 381, or the consent of the department. Please do not take this class if you are on or near academic probation.

Course Policies and Requirements

1. Readings. You should purchase the two core texts for the course at the University Bookstore or the Village Commons Bookstore:

J. Mark Payne, Daniel Zovatto G., Fernando Carrillo Flórez, and Andrés Allamand Zavala, Democracies in Development: Politics and Reform in Latin America (Washington, D.C.: Inter-American Development Bank and the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance, 2002).

Jorge I. Domínguez and Michael Shifter, Constructing Democratic Governance in Latin America, 2nd Edition (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003).

We will also read other key texts, which will be available on electronic reserve, as denoted by the "(E)" in the course outline below. In addition, I reserve the right to assign short articles on current events. These will be placed on electronic reserves or handed out in class,

The readings listed in the course outline are required, unless indicated otherwise. Doctoral students will also be responsible for the supplementary readings listed under specific topics during the first half of the course when they take the Ph.D. comprehensive exams. Most of these supplementary readings are also on electronic reserve (E).

All students will need to develop additional expertise on one or more Latin American countries in order to complete the term paper. This additional country-specific expertise is also essential for students preparing for doctoral exams. The recommended readings in the second half of the course outline are a useful starting point. Most of these readings can be found in the following books, which have been requested for print reserve (P):

Thomas E. Skidmore and Peter H. Smith, Modern Latin America, 5th Edition (New York: Oxford University Press, 2001). (P)

Larry Diamond, Jonathan Hartlyn, Juan J. Linz, and Seymour Martin Lipset, eds., Democracy in Developing Countries: Latin America, 2nd Edition (Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 1999). (P)

Scott Mainwaring and Timothy R. Scully, eds., Building Democratic Institutions: Party Systems in Latin America. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1995). (P)

Scott Mainwaring and Matthew Soberg Shugart, eds., Presidentialism and Democracy in Latin America (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997). (P)

Scott Mainwaring and Christopher Welna, eds., Democratic Accountability in Latin America (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003). (P)

Some selected chapters or pages in the above books may also be required reading, in which case they will be available on electronic reserve (E).

Please note that the required, supplementary, and recommended readings are only a very small and highly selective sample of the vast literature on democratic consolidation in Latin America. They have been carefully chosen, bearing in mind that some students in the course will not have had much prior exposure to the region and that most students are particularly interested in contemporary issues of relevance to the broader field of comparative politics.

2. Class Discussion. Although some material is most efficiently conveyed in lecture segments, I would like to run the course as a seminar as much as possible. Thus, students are expected to complete reading assignments before class so that they can make useful contributions to the class discussion. Class participation will count for 10 percent of the final grade. Both 469 and 573K students are expected to make contributions to class discussion, though I will be slightly more generous in assessing the participation of the former. In assessing class participation, I will emphasize quality, rather than mere quantity. Poor attendance or persistent tardiness can obviously have a negative impact on your participation grade.

Lecture segments and class discussion will parallel and complement, but not merely repeat, the material in the readings. You are responsible for material covered in readings but not in class and vice versa.

3. Study Guides and other ancillary materials will be posted on Blackboard before most, if not all, classes. These will contain questions designed to help you get the most out of the readings and to facilitate class discussion. If necessary, I will assign specific questions to seminar participants in order to stimulate discussion. You should review the relevant study guide, especially any discussion questions, before coming to class. The study guides should also help you to integrate material from the readings and lecture for the exams.

Materials for Tuesday classes will be posted no later than noon of the previous Saturday. Materials for Thursday classes will be posted no later than noon of the preceding Wednesday. Although this is my first experience using Blackboard, I hope that in most cases I will be able to post materials well before these deadlines. Only if there is a technical or human problem with Blackboard, will the relevant materials be distributed in class.

You can access Blackboard by following these steps:

1. Type the URL http://webcourses.niu.edu/ in the address box of your browser (Internet Explorer works best) or go to the NIU homepage and click on "Current Students," then "Academics," and then "Blackboard Course Server." You can also access Blackboard with the A-Z feature of the NIU homepage.

2. Click the Login Button.

3. Type username (Novel ID = student ZID) and password. For help with your password, please go to password.niu.edu or phone 753-8100.

4. Click Login.

5. Click on the title of this course, Topics in Latin American Politics.

6. Click on assignments.

7. Open and print out the relevant assignment.

For any technical problems in accessing Blackboard, please call 753-8100.

4. Videos. As time and scheduling permit, I will show selected videos on course-related topics. These are not "blow-off" classes; indeed, some exam questions will be based on audiovisual materials. You should print out any study guides for the videos before coming to class.

5. Exams. The mid-term exam is scheduled for March 2. The final will be given on May 6. Each exam will have objective and essay questions. The mid-term will also have a map section. Essay questions will comprise a higher percentage of the final exam. The final is not comprehensive, though much of the material has a cumulative character. If necessary, exam grades will be curved, in accordance with overall student performance. I will hand back exams for review in class; however, departmental policy requires me to retain all objective questions and answers on file.

Students in 469 and 573K will take the same exams, but I will be a bit more lenient in grading the essays of 469 students. Any curve will apply to students registered in both courses, but I will take into account the grade distribution of 469 students in determining it. I will hand back the mid-term for review in class, however, departmental policy requires me to retain all objective questions and answers on file. The final exam will remain on file and be available for review until the end of the Fall 2004 semester.

Make-up exams will be given only in the case of a documented medical or personal emergency. In such an event, Professor Schmidt (753-7058) or the Political Science Office (753-1011) must be notified before the exam. Make-up exams may be all short answer, a format that requires more intensive preparation.

6. Term Paper. Drawing primarily on the materials presented in class meetings, videos, required readings, as well as pertinent supplementary and recommended readings, each student will write a 15-20 page paper. There are two options:

(A) Pick a Latin American country and strategically assess its democratic heritage (or lack thereof) and its prospects for attaining liberal democracy. Which structural and historical factors stand out in your chosen country in relation to other countries in the region? Evaluate the country’s institutional design and assess its impact on democratic governance. Which features should be kept? Why? Which should be changed or modified? Why and how? Place your findings in comparative and theoretical perspective.

(B) Compare the experiences of at least three Latin American countries with respect to one or more institutional variables that affect democratic consolidation. Justify your selection of cases, analyze similarities and differences, and extrapolate conclusions, placing these in comparative and theoretical perspective. Your analysis should have insights that go beyond the generalizations and examples found in the required and supplementary reading.

Papers are due at the beginning of class on April 29. Late papers will be penalized 3 points for each day of tardiness. I will not accept papers that are more than five days late. Please do not submit papers as e-mail attachments. I hope to return graded papers at the time of the final.

Expectations for 469 and 573K papers will be essentially the same, but I will be a bit more lenient in grading the papers of undergraduates. I will nominate the best undergraduate paper for the writing award.

7. Auditors. Students who wish to audit the course are welcome if they are formally registered. Auditors are expected to regularly attend class and encouraged to do the readings. They are also invited to participate in class discussions if they have done the corresponding readings.

8. Course Grade. The mid-term, final, and paper will each count for 30 percent of your final grade. Class participation will count for 10 percent.

Course Grades will be distributed as follows:

Final Average Final Grade

90-100% A

80-89% B

65-79% C

50-64% D

Below 50% F

9. Incompletes. No incompletes will be given for reasons other than a medical or personal emergency and then only after presentation of verifiable documentation. Academic hardship does not qualify as an acceptable excuse.

10. Adjustments in Course Schedule. I will do my best to follow the course schedule outlined below, but I reserve the right to make reasonable adjustments with adequate warning if unforeseeable or uncontrollable circumstances (e.g. weather, illness, travel) so warrant. It is not fair, however, to change the schedule or previously set exam dates simply to accommodate the preferences of some students, since other students inevitably suffer.

11. Academic Integrity and Classroom Disruption. Students are expected to know and comply with NIU policies on academic integrity and classroom disruption (see pp. 48, 304 of the 2003-2004 Undergraduate Catalog and pp. 21-22, 269-70 of the 2003-04 Graduate Catalog). Any student found guilty of cheating or plagiarism will receive an "F" for the assignment and for the course. He or she also may be subject to additional sanctions imposed by the University

.

Course Outline

 

JANUARY 13

Introduction to Course

Land and People

Video, Introducing Latin America (56 minutes, selected portions)

JANUARY 15

Conceptualizing Democracy

Larry Diamond, Developing Democracy: Toward Consolidation (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press, 1999), pp. 1-19. (E)

Supplementary Reading:

Guillermo O’Donnell, "Delegative Democracy," Journal of Democracy 5-1 (January 1994), pp. 55-69. (E)

Democracy in Latin America: Progress or Erosion?

Diamond, Developing Democracy: Toward Consolidation, pp. 24-49. (E)

Michael Shifter, "Tempering Expectations of Democracy," in Domínguez and Shifter, Constructing Democratic Governance in Latin America, pp. 3-7.

Supplementary Reading:

Scott Mainwaring, "The Surprising Resilience of Elected Governments," Journal of Democracy 10-3 (July 1999), pp. 101-14. (E)

JANUARY 20

Historical Background: Colonial Foundations, Independence, and Early Development

Skidmore and Smith, Modern Latin America, pp. 13-41. (E)

JANUARY 22

Video: The Garden of Forking Paths (1 hour)

 

 

 

JANUARY 27

Historical Background: The Transformation of Modern Latin America

Skidmore and Smith, Modern Latin America, pp. 42-66. (E)

JANUARY 29

Factors Facilitating and Hindering Democracy

Diamond, et al., Democracy in Developing Countries: Latin America, pp. 1-70. (E)

FEBRUARY 3

The Contemporary Context of Democratization

Jorge I. Domínguez, "Constructing Democratic Governance in Latin America: Taking Stock of the 1990s," in Domínguez and Shifter, Constructing Democratic Governance in Latin America, pp. 351-81.

Forrest D. Colburn, Latin America at the End of Politics (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002), pp. 34-43. (E)

Marta Lagos, "Public Opinion," in Domínguez and Shifter, Constructing Democratic Governance in Latin America, pp. 137-61.

Payne et al., Democracies in Development: Politics and Reform in Latin America, pp. 1-64.

FEBRUARY 5

Presidential Elections and Democratic Stability

Payne et al., Democracies in Development: Politics and Reform in Latin America, pp. 65-82.

Supplementary Readings:

Matthew Soberg Shugart and John M. Carey, Presidents and Assemblies: Constitutional Design and Electoral Dynamics (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1992), pp. 206-25. (E)

Mainwaring and Shugart, eds., Presidentialism and Democracy in Latin America, pp. 394-429. (P)

Scott Mainwaring, "Presidentialism, Multipartism, and Democracy: The Difficult Combination," Comparative Political Studies 26-2, pp. 198-228. (E)

Mark P. Jones, Electoral Laws and the Survival of Presidential Democracies (Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 1995), pp. 155-66. (E)

 

 

 

FEBRUARY 10

Legislative Elections and Democratic Stability

Payne et al., Democracies in Development: Politics and Reform in Latin America, pp. 83-125.

FEBRUARY 12

Parties and Party Systems in Historical and Comparative Perspective

Harry E. Vanden and Gary Prevost, Politics of Latin America: The Power Game (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002), pp. 203-13. (E)

Mainwaring and Scully, eds., Building Democratic Institutions: Party Systems in Latin America, pp. 459-474. (E)

Video, PME: Producing Miracles Everyday (23 minutes)

FEBRUARY 17

Parties and Party Systems: Contemporary Variation in Latin America

Payne et al., Democracies in Development: Politics and Reform in Latin America, pp. 127-83.

Supplementary Readings:

Mainwaring and Scully, eds., Building Democratic Institutions: Party Systems in Latin America, pp. 1-34. (E)

Susan Stokes, Mandates and Democracy: Neoliberalism by Surprise in Latin America

(New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001), esp. chapters 1, 4, and 7. (P)

Michelle M. Taylor-Robinson, "Old Parties and New Democracies: Do They Bring Out the Best in One Another?" Party Politics 7-5, pp. 581-604. (E)

FEBRUARY 19

Balancing Executive and Legislative Prerogatives

Payne et al., Democracies in Development: Politics and Reform in Latin America, pp. 185-220.

Supplementary Readings:

Juan Linz, "The Perils of Presidentialism," Journal of Democracy 1-1 (Winter 1990), pp. 51-69.

(E)

Juan Linz, "The Virtues of Parliamentarism," Journal of Democracy 1-4 (Fall 1990), pp. 84-91. (E)

Mainwaring and Shugart, eds., Presidentialism and Democracy in Latin America, pp. 12-54. (E), pp. 429-37. (P)

John M. Carey and Matthew Soberg Shugart, Executive Decree Authority (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp. 1-29, 274-98. (P)

Gary Cox and Scott Morgenstern, "Latin America’s Reactive Assemblies and Proactive Presidents," Comparative Politics 33-2 (January 2002), pp. 171-89. (E)

FEBRUARY 24

Democratic Accountability Institutions

Payne et al., Democracies in Development: Politics and Reform in Latin America, pp. 221-48.

Supplementary Reading:

Erika Moreno, Brian F. Crisp, and Matthew Soberg Shugart, "The Accountability Deficit in Latin America," in Mainwaring and Welna, eds., Democratic Accountability in Latin America, pp. 79-131. (P)

FEBRUARY 26

Direct Democracy Institutions

Payne et al., Democracies in Development: Politics and Reform in Latin America, pp. 249-65.

Main Trends in Democratic Reform

Payne et al., Democracies in Development: Politics and Reform in Latin America, pp. 267-78.

Manuel Pastor, Jr., and Carol Wise, "The Politics of Second-Generation Reform," Journal of Democracy 10-3 (July 1999), pp. 34-48. (E)

Catch-Up and Review

MARCH 2

Mid-Term Exam

SPRING BREAK!!!

MARCH 16, 18

Go Over Mid-Term Exam

Costa Rica: Background and Political Development

Skidmore and Smith, Modern Latin America, pp. 316-27, 331-3. (E)

John A. Booth, "Costa Rica: Buffeted Democracy," in Thomas W. Walker and Ariel C. Armony, eds., Repression, Resistance, and Democratic Transition in Central America (Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Books, 2000), pp. 89-93. (E)

Costa Rica: Democratic Performance and Challenges

Booth, "Costa Rica: Buffeted Democracy," pp. 93-109. (E)

RECOMMENDED READINGS ON COSTA RICA:

John A. Booth, "Costa Rica: The Roots of Democratic Stability," in Diamond et al., eds., Democracy in Developing Countries: Latin America, pp. 429-68. (P)

Deborah J. Yahar, "Civil War and Social Welfare: The Origins of Costa Rica's Competitive Party System," in Mainwaring and Scully, eds., Building Democratic Institutions: Party Systems in Latin America, pp. 72-99. (P)

John M. Carey, "Strong Candidates for a Limited Office: Presidentialism and Political Parties in Costa Rica," in Mainwaring and Shugart, eds., Presidentialism and Democracy in Latin America, pp. 199-224. (P)

MARCH 23

Venezuela: Background and the Rise of Partyarchy

David J. Myers, "Venezuela: Shaping the ‘New Democracy,’" in Howard J. Wiarda and Harvey F. Kline, eds., Latin American Politics and Development, 5th Edition (Boulder: Westview Press), pp. 263-76. (E)

Michael Coppedge, "Venezuela: Popular Sovereignty versus Liberal Democracy," in Domínguez and Shifter, Constructing Democratic Governance in Latin America, pp. 171-75.

Video, Venezuela: Petroleum Powered Economy (30 minutes)

MARCH 25

Venezuela: Hugo Chávez and the Crisis of Venezuelan Democracy

Coppedge, "Venezuela: Popular Sovereignty versus Liberal Democracy," pp. 165-171, 175-192.

RECOMMENDED READINGS ON VENEZUELA:

Daniel H. Levine and Brian F. Crisp, "Venezuela: The Character, Crisis, and Possible Future of Democracy," in Diamond et al., eds., Democracy in Developing Countries: Latin America, pp. 366-428. (P)

Miriam Kornblith and Daniel H. Levine, "Venezuela: The Life and Times of the Party System," in Mainwaring and Scully, eds., Building Democratic Institutions: Party Systems in Latin America, pp. 37-71. (P)

Michael Coppedge, "Partidocracia and Reform in Comparative Perspective," in Jennifer McCoy et al., eds., Venezuelan Democracy Under Stress (New Brunswick N.J.: Transaction Publishers, 1995), pp. 173-96. (E)

Brian F. Crisp, "Presidential Behavior in a System with Strong Parties: Venezuela, 1958-1995," in Mainwaring and Shugart, eds., Presidentialism and Democracy in Latin America, pp. 160-98. (P)

MARCH 30

Argentina: Background and Erratic Political Development

Peter G. Snow and Luigi Manzetti, Political Forces in Argentina, 3rd edition (Westport, Connecticut: Praeger, 1993), pp. 1-8. (E)

Skidmore and Smith, Modern Latin America, pp. 100-2. (E)

Steven Levitsky, "Argentina: From Crisis to Consolidation (and Back)," in Domínguez and Shifter, Constructing Democratic Governance in Latin America, pp. 244-7.

Argentina Under Menem

Skidmore and Smith, Modern Latin America, pp. 102-6. (E)

Levitsky, "Argentina: From Crisis to Consolidation (and Back)," pp. 247-55.

APRIL 1

Argentina: The Economic Collapse and its Political Consequences

Levitsky, "Argentina: From Crisis to Consolidation (and Back)," pp. 256-68.

APRIL 6

Video, The Empty ATM (1 hour)

RECOMMENDED READINGS ON ARGENTINA:

Skidmore and Smith, Modern Latin America, pp. 68-106. (P)

Carlos H. Waisman, "Argentina: Capitalism and Democracy," in Diamond et al., eds., Democracy in Developing Countries: Latin America, pp. 71-129. (P)

James W. McGuire, "Political Parties and Democracy in Argentina," in Mainwaring and Scully, eds., Building Democratic Institutions: Party Systems in Latin America, pp. 200-46. (P)

Mark P. Jones, "Evaluating Argentina's Presidential Democracy: 1983-1995," in Mainwaring and Shugart, eds., Presidentialism and Democracy in Latin America, pp. 259-99. (P)

Scott Morgenstern and Luigi Manzetti, "Legislative Oversight: Interests and Institutions in the United States and Argentina," in Mainwaring and Welna, eds., Democratic Accountability in Latin America, pp. 132-69. (P)

APRIL 8

Peru: Background, Tenuous Democracy, and the 1990 Presidential Election

James D. Rudolph, Peru: The Evolution of a Crisis (Westport, Connecticut: Praeger, 1992), pp. 1-17. (E)

Skidmore and Smith, Modern Latin America, pp. 209-12. (E)

Gregory D. Schmidt, "Fujimori's 1990 Upset Victory in Peru: Electoral Rules, Contingencies, and Adaptive Strategies," Comparative Politics 28-3 (April 1996), pp. 321-54. (E)

Video, Mario Vargas Llosa: The Story of the Novelist Who Would be President (1 hour, selected portions)

APRIL 13

Peru’s Fujimori: From Outsider to Autocrat

Gregory D. Schmidt, "Popular Authoritarianism," (manuscript), pp. 238-79. (E)

Carlos Iván Degregori, "Peru: The Vanishing of a Regime and the Challenge of Democratic Rebuilding," in Domínguez and Shifter, Constructing Democratic Governance in Latin America, pp. 220-6.

Video: Fire in the Mind (portion on Sendero Luminoso, about 20 minutes)

Video, Interview with Alberto Fujimori (Robert Novak) (about 30 minutes, selected portions)

APRIL 15

Peru’s Fujimori: From Legitimacy to Polarization

Gregory D. Schmidt, "Popular Authoritarianism," (manuscript), pp. 279-98. (E)

Degregori, "Peru: The Vanishing of a Regime and the Challenge of Democratic Rebuilding," in Domínguez and Shifter, Constructing Democratic Governance in Latin America, pp. 226-43.

Video, Peru: We Ain’t Winning [The Drug War] (several minutes of Peruvian rap music at beginning)

Video, Peru: Road to Recovery (30 minutes, selected portions)

Video, The Fujimori Empire (34 minutes, selected portions)

APRIL 20

Peru: The 2000 Election, the Collapse of Fujimorismo, and Toledo

Gregory D. Schmidt, "The Presidential Election in Peru, April 2000," Electoral Studies 21 (2) (June 2002), pp. 346-57. (E)

Carmen Rosa Balbi and David Scott Palmer, "`Reinventing’ Democracy in Peru," Current History (February 2001), pp. 65-72. (E)

Gregory D. Schmidt, "The 2001 Presidential and Congressional Elections in Peru," Electoral Studies 22 (2) (June 2003), pp. 344-51. (E)

Video, A Hazy Transparency: Peru’s 2000 Elections (27 minutes)

Video, Peruvian News Coverage of 2000 election

RECOMMENDED READINGS ON PERU:

Skidmore and Smith, Modern Latin America, pp. 177-216. (P)

Cynthia McClintock, "Peru: Precarious Regimes, Authoritarian and Democratic," in Diamond et al., Democracy in Developing Countries: Latin America, pp. 309-65. (P)

Julio Cotler, "Political Parties and the Problems of Democratic Consolidation in Peru," in Mainwaring and Scully, eds., Building Democratic Institutions: Party Systems in Latin America, pp. 323-53. (P)

Gregory Schmidt, "Presidential Usurpation or Congressional Preference? The Evolution of Executive Decree Authority in Peru," in Carey and Shugart, eds., Executive Decree Authority), pp. 104-41. (E)

Kenneth M. Roberts, "Neoliberalism and the Transformation of Populism in Latin America: The Peruvian Case," World Politics 48-1 (October 1995), pp. 82-116. (E)

Gregory D. Schmidt, "Delegative Democracy in Peru?: Fujimori's 1995 Landslide and the Prospects for 2000," Journal of Interamerican Studies and World Affairs 42-1 (Spring 2000), pp. 99-132. (E)

APRIL 22

Brazil: Background and Political Development

Riordan Roett, Brazil: Politics in a Patrimonial Society, 5th edition (Westport, Connecticut: Praeger, 1999), pp. TBA

Skidmore and Smith, Modern Latin America, pp. 173-6. (E)

Video, Capital Sins (1 hour)

APRIL 27

Brazil: Political Institutions and the Cardoso Administration

Bolívar Lamounier, "Brazil: An Assessment of the Cardoso Administration," in

Domínguez and Shifter, Constructing Democratic Governance in Latin America, pp. 269-91.

APRIL 29

Term Papers Due!

Brazil: The Left Takes Power

Reading, TBA

Video, Brazil in Emerging Powers Series (1 hour, selected portions)

 

 

RECOMMENDED READINGS ON BRAZIL:

Skidmore and Smith, Modern Latin America, pp. 137-76. (P)

Bolívar Lamounier, "Brazil: Inequality Against Democracy," in Diamond et al., eds., Democracy in Developing Countries: Latin America, pp. 130-89. (P)

Scott Mainwaring, "Politicians, Parties, and Electoral Systems: Brazil in Comparative Perspective," Comparative Politics (October 1991), pp. 21-43. (E)

Barry Ames, "Electoral Strategy Under Open-List Proportional Representation," American Journal of Political Science 39-2 (May 1995), pp. 406-33. (E)

Scott Mainwaring, "Politicians, Parties, and Electoral Systems: Brazil in Comparative Perspective," Comparative Politics 24-1 (October 1991), pp. 21-43. (E)

Scott Mainwaring, "Brazil: Weak Parties, Feckless Democracy," in Mainwaring and Scully, eds., Building Democratic Institutions: Party Systems in Latin America, pp. 354-98. (P)

Scott Mainwaring, "Multipartism, Robust Federalism, and Presidentialism in Brazil," in Mainwaring and Shugart, eds., Presidentialism and Democracy in Latin America, pp. 55-109. (P)

Argelina Cheibub Figueiredo, "The Role of Congress as an Agency of Horizontal Accountability: Lessons from the Brazilian Experience," in Mainwaring and Welna, eds., Democratic Accountability in Latin America, 170-97. (P)

MAY 6

Final Exam: 10 – 11:50 a.m.

Additional Information for Students Taking Political Science Courses

1. Undergraduate Writing Awards. The Department of Political Science will recognize, on an annual basis, outstanding undergraduate papers written in conjunction with 300-400 level political science courses or directed studies. Authors do not have to be political science majors or have a particular class standing. Winners are expected to attend the Department’s spring graduation ceremony where they will receive a certificate and $50.00. Papers, which can be submitted by students or faculty, must be supplied in triplicate to a department secretary by February 29, 2004. All copies should have two cover pages – one with the student’s name and one without the student’s name. Only papers written in the previous calendar year can be considered for the award. However, papers completed in the current spring semester are eligible for the following year’s competition even if the student has graduated.

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