Thursday 6:30-9:10                                                                                             POLS 673N

Office hours: T 3:30-6:00, Th 2:00-2:30                                           DuSable 466, Fall 2008

dunger@niu.edu 753 7042                                                                          Professor Unger

 

 

Foreign Area Politics: Thailand

 

This course’s intensive study of Thai politics aims at giving students a deep familiarity with the English language literature on the subject.  The readings cover the issues necessary to understand politics in Thailand.  While only some of the readings are explicitly comparative, students should try to address all the readings with a comparative framework in mind.  The assignments are designed to maximize student contributions to discussion of the readings and to develop a paper suitable for presentation.

 

Note: Students taking the candidacy exam in comparative politics will be responsible for all the readings listed on this syllabus under the headings supplementary and required.  Please also note the questions listed at the end of this syllabus.  These questions are representative of the kinds of questions students will be expected to be able to answer when taking the candidacy exam.

 

Required texts:

 

Paul Handley, The King Never Smiles

 

For a useful bibliography of sources on Thailand, see www.leeds.ac.uk/thaipol

The required readings for the course average less than 120 pages a week (with readings marked “skim” discounted at 25%.)  Few of the readings are highly abstract so students should find the load manageable.  The load is quite uniform, but heavier in early and lighter in late April.  Assigned readings not from the two required texts are mostly available online from the library.  A few readings, however, will be available only in print at the library reserves desk.

 

Requirements:

 

            -two class presentations of readings, 10% each                                  20%

            -final exam (short answer questions and one long essay)                   35%

            -command of readings as reflected in class contributions                  20%

            -20-page papers (due April 25)                                                           25%

prepare for presentation at International Thai Studies Conference, Council on Thai Studies, NIU Southeast Asian Studies Student Conference, or professional conferences such as Association of Asian Studies, American Political Science Association, International Studies Association

 

INTRODUCTION

 

August 28, Introduction to course themes and assignments (guest Professor)

 

September 4, Elements of traditional Thai polities, I

            Required readings:

-Baker and Pasuk, A History, pp.47-139

Suggested readings:

-Kamol Somvichian, “The Thai Political Culture and Political Development,” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Cambridge, Mass.: Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.153-69

-Thongchai Winichakul, Siam Mapped, A History of the Geo-Body of a Nation (Silkworm Books, 1994)

Supplemental readings:

-David Morell and Chai-anan, Political Conflict in Thailand, pp.7-73

-David Wilson, Politics in Thailand, pp.1-9

-Tamara Loos, Subject Siam: Family, Law, and Colonial Modernity in Thailand (Cornell University Press, 2002)

-Scot Barme, Woman, Man, Bangkok: Love, Sex, and Popular Culture in Thailand (Silkworm Books, 2002)

-Jane Bunnag, “Loose Structure: Fact or Fancy?” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.133-52

 

September 11, Elements of traditional Thai polities, II

Required readings:

-Lucien M. Hanks, “Merit and Power in the Thai Social Order,” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.95-113

-Neil A. Englehart, Culture and Power in Traditional Siamese Government (Cornell SEAP, 2001) pp.19-53

-Kevin Hewison, “Introduction” in Hewison, ed., Political Change, pp.1-20

Suggested readings:

-Joseph J. Wright, Jr., The Balancing Act, A History of Modern Thailand (Asia Books, 1991) pp.17-32, 59-104, 184-96

-Hans-Dieter Bechstedt, “Identity and authority in Thailand,” Craig J. Reynolds, National Identity and its Defenders, Thailand Today (Silkworm, 2002) pp.238-61

-Philip Hirsch, “What is the Thai village?,” in Craig J. Reynolds, National Identity and its Defenders, Thailand Today (Silkworm, 2002) pp.262-76

-Akin Rabibhadena, “The organization of Thai society in the early Bangkok period, 1782-1873,” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.27-41

-J.L. Taylor, “Embodiment, Nation, and Religio-Politics in Thailand,” South East Asia Research, 9:2, 2001, pp.129-47

 

September 18, Local and rural politics in Thailand

Required readings:

-Ockey, Making Democracy, pp.81-100

-Neil A. Englehart, Culture and Power in Traditional Siamese Government (Cornell SEAP, 2001) pp.55-82

-Daniel Arghiros, “Political Reform and Civil Society at the Local Level: Thailand’s Local Government Reforms,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.223-46

-Benedict Anderson, “Murder and Progress in Modern Siam,” New Left Review, 81:2, 1990, pp.33-48

Suggested readings:

-Sulak Sivaraksa, “The crisis of Siamese identity,” in Craig J. Reynolds, National Identity and its Defenders, Thailand Today (Silkworm, 2002) pp.33-48

-Charles Keyes, “Local Leadership in Rural Thailand,” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.197-228

-Bruce Missingham, “Local bureaucrats, power and participation: A study of two village schools in the Northeast,”in Kevin Hewison, ed., Political Change in Thailand (Routledge, 1997) pp.149-62

-Moshe Yegar, Between Integration and Secession, The Muslim Communities of the Southern Philippines, Southern Thailand, and Western Burma/Myanmar (Lexington, 2002)

-Charles F. Keyes, “Cultural Diversity and National Identity in Thailand,” in Michael E. Brown and Sumit Ganguly, eds., Government Policies and Ethnic Relations in Asia and the Pacific (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1997) pp.197-232

Supplemental readings:

-Nishizaki Yoshinori, “Provincializing Thai Politics,” Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, 1:1, March 2002

-Phil Robertson, Jr. “The Rise of the Rural Network Politician,” Asian Survey, 1996, pp.924-41

-Kevin Hewison, “Responding to Economic Crisis: Thailand’s Localism,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.143-62

-Pasuk and Baker, Thailand Economy and Politics, pp.323-66

-James Ockey, “The Rise of Local Power in Thailand: Provincial Crime, Elections and the Bureaucracy,” McVey, ed., Money and Power in Provincial Thailand (University of Hawaii, 2000) 74-96

 

September 25, The military and civilian bureaucracy

            Required readings:

-William J. Siffin, “The Essential Character of the Contemporary Bureaucracy,” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.337-55

-David A.Wilson, “Political tradition and Political Change in Thailand,” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.281-93

-Fred Riggs, “The bureaucratic polity as a working system,” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.356-74

-Danny Unger, “Principals of the Thai State,” in Ben Ross Schneider and Blanca Heredia, eds., Reinventing Leviathan, The Politics of Administrative Reform in Developing Countries (North-South Center Press, 2003) pp.181-210

-James Ockey, “Thailand: The Struggle to Redefine Civil-Military Relations,” in Muthiah Alagappa, ed., Coercion and Governance, the Declining Political Role of the Military in Asia (Stanford University Press, 2001) pp.187-208

Suggested readings:

-Chai-anan Samudavanija, “The Bureaucracy,” pp.75-109

-Benedict R. O’Gorman Anderson, “Withdrawal Symptoms: Social and Cultural Bases of the October 6, 1976 Coup in Siam

-James C. Scott, “Corruption in Thailand,” in Clark Neher, ed., Modern Thai Politics, revised edition (Cambridge, Mass.: Schenkman Publishing Company, 1979) pp.294-316

-Suchit Bunbongkarn, The Military in Thai Politics, 1981-86 (ISEAS, 1987) pp.9-76

-Yoshihara Kunio, The Nation and Economic Growth, the Philippines and Thailand (Oxford, 1994) pp.147-56, 188-91, 220-33

-Marian Mallet, “Causes and Consequences of the October ’76 Coup,” Journal of Contemporary Southeast Asia, 1978, pp.80-103

-Mark Turner, “Choosing Items from the Menu, New Public Management in Southeast Asia,” International Journal of Public Administration 25:12, 2002, 1493-1512

-Barbara Nunberg, “Civil Service Quality after the Crisis: A View of Five Asian Cases,” Asian Journal of Political Science, 10:2, 2002, pp.1-20

-Bidhya Bowornwathana, “Thailand: Bureaucracy Under Coalition Government,” John Burns and Bidhya eds., Civil Service Systems in Asia (Edward Elgar, 2001)

-Takashi Shiraishi, “The Military in Politics, Politics in the Military: Thailand, Burma, and Indonesia” UCB paper 1984

-David K. Wyatt, “The Military Ascendant, 1932-1957,” pp.243-75

-Suchit Bunbongkarn, “Decline of the Military,” pp.46-69

Supplemental readings:

- Chai-Anan Samudavanija, “Old soldiers never die, they are just bypassed: The military, bureaucracy, and globalisation,” in Kevin Hewison, ed., Political Change in Thailand (Routledge, 1997) pp.42-57

 

October 2, The economy in growth and in crisis

            Required readings:

-Richard Doner and Ansil Ramsay, “Competitive Clientelism and Economic Growth: The Case of Thailand,” in Sylvia Maxfield and Ben Ross Schneider, eds., Business and the State in Developing Countries (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1997) 237-76

-Danny Unger, Building Social Capital in Thailand (Cambridge, 1998), pp.1-8, 83-108

-Danny Unger, “Thailand: What Goes Up…” in Leslie Elliott Armijo, ed., Financial Globalization and Democracy in Emerging Markets (Palgrave, 2001) pp.276-300

-Pasuk Phongpaichit and Chris Baker, “Thaksin’s Populism,” Journal of Contemporary Asia, 38:1, February 2008, pp.62-83

-Ruth McVey, “The Materialization of the SE Asian Entrepreneur,” in McVey, ed. SEAsian Captialists pp.7-33

-Sakkarin Niyomsilpa, “Industry globalized: The automotive sector,” in Pasuk Phongpaichit and Chris Baker, eds. Thai Capital After the 1997 Crisis (Silkworm Books, 2008) 61-84

Suggested readings:

- Pasuk and Chris, Thailand’s Boom! (Silkworm, 1996) pp.28-55

-Chris Dixon, “The Causes of Thai Economic Crisis: The Internal Perspective,” Geoforum, 32:1, 2001, pp.47-60

-Laurids S. Lauridsen, “Struggling with Globalization in Thailand: Accumulation, Learning, or Market Competition,” South East Asia Research, 10:2, 2002, pp.155-83

-Daniel Arghiros, “The Local Dynamics of the ‘New Political Economy’: A District Business Association and Its Role in Electoral Politics,” McVey, ed., Money and Power in Provincial Thailand (University of Hawaii, 2000) 123-53

-Parichart Chotiya, “The changing role of provincial business in the Thai political economy,” in Kevin Hewison, ed., Political Change in Thailand (Routledge, 1997) pp.251-64

-Linda Y.C. Lim and Aaron Stern, “State Power and Private Profits: Review Essay on the Political Economy of Corruption in Southeast Asia,” Asia-Pacific Economic Literature

-Pasuk Phongpaichit and Chris Baker, Thailand, Economy and Politics (Oxford, 1995) pp.211-43

-Jasper Goss and David Burch, “From Agricultural Modernisation to Agri-Food Globalisation: The Waning of National Development in Thailand,” Third World Quarterly, 22:6, 2001, pp.969-86

-Paul Handley, “More of the same?  Politics and business,” in Kevin Hewison, ed., Political Change in Thailand (Routledge, 1997) pp.94-113

-Yoshihara Kunio, The Nation and Economic Growth, the Philippines and Thailand (Oxford, 1994) on the Chinese and foreign capital, and government regulation of the economy, pp.15-21, 32-36, 41-53, 75-88, 117-44, 188-200

-Laurids Lauridsen, Industrial policies, political institutions and industrial development in Thailand 1959-1991

- Laurids Lauridsen, Policies and institutions of industrial deepening and upgrading in Thailand I—the basic industry strategy in petrochemicals

-Laurids Lauridsen, Policies and institutions of industrial deepening and upgrading in Thailand II—the supporting industry policy with particular emphasis on the downstream plastic parts and mould industries

-Anek Laothamatas, “The Politics of Structural Adjustment in Thailand,”

-Richard Doner and Anek Laothamatas, “Thailand: Economic and Political Gradualism,” in Stephan Haggard and Steven Webb, eds., Voting for Reform: Democracy, Political Liberalization, and Economic Adjustment (New York: Oxford University Press,

-Pasuk Phongpaichit and Chris Baker, Thailand’s Crisis (Silkworm, 2000) pp.14-106 (skim)

-Gustav Ranis and Syed Akhtar Mahmood, The Political Economy of Development Policy Change (Blackwell, 1992), Ch. 5, the Philippines and Thailand

-Walter Persaud, “Gender, Race and Global Modernity: A Perspective from Thailand,” Globalizations, 2:2, 2005, pp.210-227

-Craig Reynolds, “Thai Identity in the Age of Globalization,” pp.308-38

-Olarn Chaipravat, “Thailand’s Positioning in a New Global Economic Paradigm,” Kyoto Review, 2003

-Peter G. Warr and Bhanupong Nidhiprabha, Thailand’s Macroeconomic Miracle (World Bank, 1996) pp.19-28, 228-236

-Pasuk Phongpaichit and Sungsidh Piriyarangsan, Corruption and Democracy in Thailand (Bangkok: Silkworm Books, 1994) pp.1-25, 51-98

-Pasuk Phongpaichit, Sungsidh Piriyarangsan, and Nualnoi Treerat, Guns Girls Gambling Ganja, Thailand’s Illegal Economy and Public Policy (Bangkok: Silkworm Books, 1998) pp.155-214 (skim)

-Scott B. MacDonald, “Transparency in Thailand’s 1997 Economic Crisis,” Asian Survey, 38:7, July 1998

-William H. Overholt, “Asia’s Continuing Crisis,” Survival, 44:1, 2002, pp.97-114

-Kasian Tejapira, “Post-Crisis Economic Impasse and Political Recovery in Thailand: The Resurgence of Economic Nationalism,” Critical Asian Studies, 34:3, 2002, pp.323-56

-Peter Warr, “Thailand’s Non-Recovery,” Southeast Asian Affairs, 29, 2002, pp.326-42

-Linda Lim, “Whose ‘Model’ Failed? Implications of the Asian Economic Crisis,” The Washington Quarterly, 21:3, 1998, pp.25-36

-Robert Muscat, The Fifth Tiger, pp.223-91

-Tom Ginsburg, “Does Law Matter for Economic Development? Evidence from East Asia,” Law and Society Review, 34:3, 2000, pp.829-56

-Suehiro Akira, Capital Accumulation in Thailand, 1855-1985 (The Center for East Asian Studies, 1989) pp.178-272

            Supplemental:

-Robert J. Muscat, The Fifth Tiger, A Study of Thai Development Policy (M.E. Sharpe, 1994) pp.86-127, 170-222

-Akira Suehiro, “Capitalist Development in Postwar Thailand,” pp.35-63 in McVey

-Andrew MacIntyre, “Institutions and Investors: The Politics of the Economic Crisis in Southeast Asia,” International Organization, 55:1, 2002, pp.81-122

-Jamie Mackie, “Business Success Among Southeast Asian Chinese,” in Robert Hefner, ed. Market Cultures, 1998, pp.129-146

 

October 9, The monarchy, I

            Required readings:

            -Paul Handley, The King Never Smiles, pp.44-99, 139-237

-Kevin Hewison, “The monarchy and democratization,” in Hewison ed., Political Change in Thailand, pp.58-74

            Suggested readings:

-His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej, Biography of a Pet Dog, The Story of Tongdaeng (Bangkok: Amarin Printing and Publishing, 2002) pp.46-61

            -Pasuk and Baker, Thailand Economy and Politics, pp.218-43

-Roger Kershaw, Monarchy in Southeast Asia (Taylor and Francis, 2002)

-Kobkua Suwannathat-Pian, Kings, Country, and Constitutions: Thailand’s Political Development 1932-2000 (2000)

            -Kullada Kesboonchoo Mead, The Rise and Decline of Thai Absolutism (2003)

-William Stevenson, The Revolutionary King (London: Constable and Co., 1999)

Supplemental readings:

-Kobkua Suwannathat-Pian, “The Monarchy and Constitutional Change Since 1972,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.57-72

-James Ockey, “Monarch, monarchy, succession and stability in Thailand,” Asia Pacific Viewpoint 46:2, 2005, pp.115-27

 

October 16, The monarchy, II

            Required readings:

-Paul Handley, The King Never Smiles, pp.276-98, 328-93

-Duncan McCargo, “Network monarchy and legitimacy crises,” The Pacific Review, 18:4, 2005, pp.499-519

-Danny Unger, “What’s an Anagram for Anachronism?”

 

October 23, The middle class, civic associations, NGOs, natural resources, rural social movements and civil society, I

            Required readings:

-Ockey, Making Democracy, pp.151-71

-Andrew Brown, “Locating working-class power,” in Kevin Hewison, ed., Political Change in Thailand (Routledge, 1997) pp.163-78

-Philip Hirsch, “The politics of environment: Opposition and legitimacy,” in -Kevin Hewison, ed., Political Change in Thailand (Routledge, 1997) pp.179-94

-John Girling, Interpreting Development, pp.43-76

-James Ockey, “Civil Society and Street Politics: Lessons from the 1950s,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.107-24

Suggested readings:

-Sinith Sittirak, The Daughters of Development (Zed Books, 1998) pp.21-75

political roles,” in Kevin Hewison, ed., Political Change in Thailand (Routledge, -Peter A. Jackson, “Withering center, flourishing margins: Buddhism’s changing 1997) pp.75-93

-Atsushi Kitahara, The Thai Rural Community Reconsidered, Historical Community Formation and Contemporary Development Movements (The Political Economy Centre, Chulalongkorn University, 1996)

-J.L. Taylor, “Embodiment, nation, and religio-politics in Thailand,” South East Asia Research, 9:2, pp.129-147

-Somchai Phatharathanaunth, “Civil Society and Democratization in Thailand: A Critique of Elite Democracy,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.125-42

-Naruemon Thabchumpon, “NGOs and Grassroots Participation in the Political Reform Process,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.183-202

-Pasuk and Baker, “Power in transition,” in Hewison, ed., Political Change, pp.21-41

-Stephen B. Young and Surin Pitsuwan, “Democracy and Traditional Political Culture in Thailand,” October 1978

-Michael Nelson, “Thailand,” pp.1-65 (electoral statistics for most part

-Ukrist Pathmanand, “Globalization and Democratic Development in Thailand: The New Path of the Military, Private Sector, and Civil Society,” Contemporary Southeast Asia, 23:1, 2001, pp.24-42

-Chai-anan Samudavanija, “State-Identity Creation, State-Building and Civil Society,” in Craig J. Reynolds, National Identity and its Defenders, Thailand Today (Silkworm, 2002) pp.49-70

-Walden Bello, Shea Cunningham, Li Kheng Poh, A Siamese Tragedy (White Lotus, 1998) pp.1-9, 175-205

Supplementary readings:

- Pasuk Phongpaichit and Chris Baker, Thailand, Economy and Politics (Oxford, 1995) pp.367-94

-William H. Overholt, “Thailand: A Moving Equilibrium,” in Ansil Ramsay and Wiwat Mungkandi, eds., Thailand-U.S. Relations; Changing Political, Strategic, and Economic Factors (Berkeley: Institute of East Asian Studies, 1988) pp.155-94

-James P. LoGerfo, “Beyond Bangkok: The Provincial Middle Class in the 1992 Protests,” McVey, ed., Money and Power in Provincial Thailand (University of Hawaii, 2000) 221-70

           

October 30, The middle class, civic associations, NGOs, natural resources, rural social movements and civil society, II

            Required readings:

            -Ockey, Making Democracy, pp.124-50

-Thitinan Pongsudhirak, “Thailand’s media: Whose watchdog?” in Kevin Hewison, ed., Political Change in Thailand (Routledge, 1997) pp.217-32

-Johannes Dragsbaek Schmidt, “Democratization and Social Welfare in Thailand,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.91-106

-Philippe Doneys, “Political Reform through the Public Sphere: Women’s Groups and the Fabric of Governance,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.163-82

-James Ockey, “Thai Society and Patterns of Political Leadership,” Asian Survey, 1996, pp.345-59

Suggested readings:

-Duncan McCargo, Politics and the Press in Thailand (Garuda Press, 2000) pp.1-42

-Rosalind C. Morris, “Failures of Domestication: Speculations on Globality, Economy, and the Sex of Excess in Thailand,” Differences, 13:1, 2002, pp.45-76

-Annette Hamilton, “Rumours, Foul Calumnies and the Safety of the State,” in Craig J. Reynolds, National Identity and its Defenders, Thailand Today (Silkworm, 2002) pp.277-307

-Maurizio Peleggi, Thailand, The Worldly Kingdom (Singapore: Reaktion Books, 1997)

-Ubonrat Siriyuvasak, “Regulation, Reform and the Question of Democratising the Broadcast Media in Thailand,” Javnost/The Public, 8:2, 2001, pp.89-108

-Chaiwat Satha-Anand, “Defending Community, Strengthening Civil Society,” pp.91-103

-Duncan McCargo, “Southern Thai Politics: A Preliminary Overview,” POLIS Working Paper No.3, February 2004, University of Leeds

-Duncan McCargo, “Security, development and political participation in Thailand: Alternative currencies of legitimacy,” Contemporary Southeast Asia 24:1, 2002, pp.50-67

-Philip Hirsch, ed. Seeing Forests for Trees, Environment and Environmentalism in Thailand (Chiang Mai: Silkworm Books, 1997)

Supplementary readings:

-James Ockey, Making Democracy, pp.56-80, 101-23

-Duncan McCargo, “Populism and reformism in contemporary Thailand,” South East Asia Research, 9:1, pp.89-107

-Benedict Anderson, “Murder and Progress in Modern Siam,” pp.33-48

-Kazuki Iwanaga, ed. Women and Politics in Thailand (Copenhagen: NIAS Press,             2008)

-Shigeharu Tanabe, ed. Imagining Communities in Thailand, Ethnographic             Approaches (Chiang Mai: Mekong Press, 2008)

 

November 6, Democratization, parties and elections, I

            Required readings:

-James Ockey, Making Democracy, pp.22-55

-James Ockey, “Political Parties, Factions, and Corruption in Thailand,” Modern Asian Studies 28:2, 1994, pp. 51-77

-Benedict R. Anderson, “Election and participation in three Southeast Asian countries,” in R.H. Taylor, ed., The politics of elections in Southeast Asia (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996) pp.12-33

-Duncan McCargo, “Thailand’s political parties,” in Kevin Hewison, ed. Political Change in Thailand, pp.114-31

-John T. Sidel, “Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy Revisited,” Comparative Politics, 40:2, January 2008, pp.127-47

Suggested readings:

            Paul Chambers, “Factions, Parties and the Durability of Parliaments, Coalitions      and Cabinets,” Party Politics, 14:3, 2008, pp.299-323

November 13, Democratization, parties and elections, II

            Required readings:

-Duncan McCargo, “Security, Development and Political Participation in Thailand: Alternative Currencies of Legitimacy,” Contemporary Southeast Asia, 24:1, 2002, pp.50-67

-Michael Connors, “Framing the ‘People’s Constitution,’” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.37-56

-Allen Hicken, “Parties, Policy and Patronage: Governance and Growth in Thailand,” in J.E.L. Campos, ed., Corruption: The Boom and Bust of East Asia (Manila: Ateneo de Manila Press, 2001)

-James Ockey, “Change and Continuity in the Thai Political Party System,” Asian Survey, 43:4, 2003, pp.663-80

-Anek Laothamatas, “A Tale of Two Democracies: Conflicting Perceptions of Elections and Democracy in Thailand,” in R.H. Taylor, ed., The Politics of Elections in Southeast Asia (New York: Cambridge University Press, New York, 1996) 201-23

Suggested readings:

-Junhan Lee, “Primary Causes of Asian Democratization: Dispelling Conventional Myths,” Asian Survey, 42:6, 2002, pp.821-37

-Aurel Croissant, “Majoritarian and Consensus Democracy, Electoral Systems, and Democratic Consolidation,” Asian Perspective, 26:2, 2002, pp.5-39

-Michael Kelly Connors, Democracy and National Identity in Thailand (Nordic Institute of Asian Studies, 2003)

-Amitav Acharya, “Southeast Asia’s Democratic Moment,” Asian Survey, 39:3, 1999, pp.418-32

-Paul Chambers, “Factions, Parties and the Durability of Parliaments, Coalitions and Cabinets,” Party Politics, 14:3, 2008, pp.299-323

-N. Ganesan, “Appraising Democratic Developments in Postauthoritarian States: Thailand and Indonesia,” Asian Affairs: An American Review, 28:1, 2001, pp.3-17

-David Murray, Angels and Devils (White Orchid Press, 1996) pp.257-69

-Alex M. Mutebi, “Thailand in 2002: Political Consolidation amid Economic Uncertainties,” Asian Survey, 43:1, pp.101-12

-Sombat Chantornvong, “The 1997 Constitution and the Politics of Electoral Reform,” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.203-222

-Ji Giles Ungpakorn, “From Tragedy to Comedy: Political Reform in Thailand,” Journal of Contemporary Asia, 32:2, 2002, pp.191-205

-Saitip Sukatipan, “Thailand, the Evolution of Legitimacy,” in Muthiah Alagappa, ed., Political Legitimacy in Southeast Asia (Stanford University Press, 1995) pp.193-223

-Daniel Arghiros, Democracy, Development and Decentralization in Provincial Thailand (Curzon, Nordic Institute of Asian Studies, 2001)

-Suchit Bunbongkarn, “Elections and democratization in Thailand,” in R.H. Taylor, ed., The politics of elections in Southeast Asia (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996) pp.245-64

-Anusorn Limmanee, “Thailand,” in Wolfgang Sachsendroder and Ulrike E. Frings, eds., Political Party Systems and Democratic Development in East and Southeast Asia, Volume I (Brookfield USA: Ashgate, 1998) pp. 403-48

-Robert B. Albritton, “Political Parties and Elections in Thailand in an Era of Globalization: No Longer a Semi-Democracy,”

            Supplementary readings:

-Duncan McCargo, “Populism and Reformism in Contemporary Thailand,” South East Asia Research, 9:1, 2001, pp.89-107

-Neil A. Englehart, “Democracy and the Thai Middle Class: Globalization, Modernization, and Constitutional Change,” Asian Survey, 43:2, 2003, pp.253-79

 

November 20, Democratization, parties and elections, III

            Required readings:

-David Collier and Steven Levitsky, “Democracy with Adjectives: Conceptual Innovations in Comparative Research,” World Politics, 49:3, 1997 pp.130-51

-Arend Lijphart, Democracies (Yale University Press, 1984)

-Herbert Kitschelt et al. Post-Communist Party Systems (Cambridge University Press, 1999) pp.1-16, 43-92

-Ruth McVey, “Of Greed and Violence, and Other Signs of Progress,” McVey, ed., Money and Power in Provincial Thailand (University of Hawaii, 2000), pp.1-29

 

December 4, Thaksin: public policies and political changes, I

            20-page paper due in class

Required readings:

-Pasuk Phongpaichit and Chris Baker, Thaksin, The Business of Politics in Thailand, pp.99-196

-Duncan McCargo and Ukrist Pathmanand, The Thaksinization of Thailand, pp.70-120, 166-208

-Duncan McCargo, “Thaksin and the Resurgence of Violence in the Thai South,” Critical Asian Studies, 38:1, 2006, pp.39-71

Suggested readings:

-Duncan McCargo, “Democracy under Stress in Thaksin’s Thailand,” Journal of Democracy, 13:4, 2002, pp.112-26

-Darryl S.L. Jarvis, “Problems and Prospects in Thaksin’s Thailand,” Asian Survey, 42:2, 2002, pp.297-319

-Giles Ji Ungpakorn, A Coup for the Rich, Thailand’s Political Crisis (Workers Democracy Publishing, 2007)

-John Funston, “Thailand: Thaksin Fever,” Southeast Asian Affairs, 29, 2002, pp.305-25

-Duncan McCargo, “Thailand’s January 2001 General Elections: Vindicating Reform?” in Duncan McCargo, ed., Reforming Thai Politics (Copenhagen: NIAS, 2002) pp.247-60

-Michael J. Montesano, “Thailand in 2001: Learning to Live with Thaksin?” Asian Survey, 42:1, 2002, pp.90-99

-Duncan McCargo, ed. Rethinking Thailand’s Southern Violence (Singapore, NUS Press, 2007)

-Michael J. Montesano and Patrick Jory, eds. Thai South and Malay North, Ethnic Interactions on a Plural Peninsula (Singapore: NUS Press, 2008)

Supplemental readings:

-Kasian Tejapira, “Toppling Thaksin,” The New Left Review May-June 2006, pp.5-37

 

Thursday, December 11, 6-7:50: final exam

 

 


Representative questions for the candidacy exam in comparative politics:

 

-Define civil society and describe its emergence and significance in Thailand.  In what ways has civil society shaped Thai politics?

-Discuss the utility of a political cultural perspective to understanding Thai politics.

-What roles has Buddhism played in Thai society and politics?  In what ways have those roles changed over time?

-What factors accounted for and sustained Thailand’s bureaucratic polity?  What factors accounted for its demise? 

-Does the emergence of parliament as the central political institution in politics facilitate the achievement of goals such as social justice and equality of economic opportunity?  Has parliament in Thailand emerged as the country’s central political institution?  Has it facilitated achievement of those goals?

-Trace the development of Thai state capacities from the 19th century.  To what degree have those developments been linked to political changes?  Explain those links and the extent to which state officials have been accountable to political leaders.

-Parliament, suggests Benedict Anderson, has opened horizontal and vertical channels of power to provincial actors in Thailand.  Explain this assertion and provide examples supporting, or undermining, his argument.

-What are the key features of the 1997 Thai constitution?  What factors accounted for their inclusion in the charter?  Discuss their impact since 1997.

-The 1997 constitution mandated decentralization.  What kinds of decentralization are required?  What types of decentralization have been implemented to date and with what effects?

-Has Thailand’s central bureaucracy been an effective instrument of national integration?  Has the bureaucracy been under firm political control?  In what ways has the relationship between political leaders and the bureaucracy changed over time?

-Explain the dominant role of the Thai military in the country’s politics between 1932 and 1992.  In what ways did the military exercise its power.  Note ways in which its roles were distinctive from a comparative perspective.  Has the military’s role in politics been in retreat since 1992?

-Did the years 1932, 1958, 1973, 1992, and 1997 represent watersheds in Thailand’s modern history?  Which of these years are, in your view, associated with the most pivotal changes in Thai politics?  Economics?

-Is democracy an effective vehicle for achieving social justice?  Discuss in terms of Anderson’s distinction between transformative and restorative electoralism.

-Is the Thai monarchy today a force either engendering or impeding political reform? 

-Discuss the emergence and significance of civil society in Thailand and its changing political roles.  Does civil society enjoy strong links to political or governmental institutions?  If so, which ones and what is the nature of those links?  Refer specifically to labor, farmers, the middle class, and political parties.

-What are the obstacles to a fully consolidated democracy in Thailand?  Consider this question from culturalist, institutionalist, and structuralist perspectives.

-What are the roles of the Thai press in politics?  Does the press serve as a servant of the state?  A watchdog?  A mirror of society?  Note the characteristic features of the Thai press.

-What are the causes, consequences, and types of corruption in Thailand?

-What is the nature of political conflict in southern Thailand?  How has this conflict developed over time?

-Describe and characterize Thai ideologies and their relative importance.  Refer to traditional institutions as well as to more recent formulations of localism, community development, and King Bhumipol’s “new theory.”

-Describe patterns of macroeconomic policy making in Thailand and how those have changed since the early 1950s.  What have been the key institutions dominating the making of these policies?

-In what ways have the economic development experience of Thailand and developmental states such as Korea and Taiwan diverged?  Refer to policy makers, institutions, policies, and outcomes.

-What have been the main sources of economic governance in Thailand?

-Describe the main, competing arguments about the sources of Thailand’s economic collapse in 1997.  Note also the main prescriptions offered as policy responses to the crisis.  In what ways have these causes, responses, and debates differed from those of other Asian countries that were hard hit by the crisis?

-How did governance of the Thai financial sector change between the 1950s and today?  What significance did such changes have for Thai economic and political developments?

-How can we explain the rise to power and successful centralization of power by Thaksin?

-What impact did Thaksin have on Thailand’s politics?

-What factors led to the September 19, 2006 coup?  What impact did it have on Thai politics?