POLS 588:  East Asian Security

(Graduate Seminar   Fall 2005)

 

 

Prof. Edward Kwon                                                              Northern Illinois University

Office: Zulauf 402                                                              Department of Political Science

Phone: 753-7055                                                                   Class: Thurs 3:00 - 5: 40 pm

E-mail: edteaching@yahoo.com                                           Class Room: DU 466                     

Office Hours: Tues 2:00-3:30 pm

                       or by appointment                                       

 

 

This course is designed as a seminar course for graduate students interested in East Asian security. It focuses on the United States, China, Russia and the former Soviet Union, Japan, and South and North Korea. First, we will investigate theoretical discussions on security on an international systemic level, such as the balance of power, alliance, collective security, and deterrence. Next, we will consider the constructive viewpoints of international security emphasizing the values and identity of the international actors in East Asia. We then will trace the historical background of East Asian security from two broad time frameworks - Cold War and post-Cold War – we will overview the change and continuity of main actors’ strategic concerns and national interests toward the region. In doing so, we will focus on major powers interactions from international relations and international political economic perspectives. We will discuss the importance of economic security such as maintaining stable export and import markets and a proper exchange rate. Lastly, we will explore current hot-button issues in East Asia, such as North Korea’s nuclear weapons program with the updated evolution of the six-party talks, and the economic conflicts among the United States, China, Japan, and South Korea. 

 

  

Requirement:

 

1) Class Participation (30%)

Four or five students will present an overview of an assigned article or book chapters based on their research concerns in each class. Student should identify several issues and discuss them in every class. During the presentation, the instructor will intervene from time to time to give some comments and lead class discussions. Students are expected to attend all classes, so absences without pre-notification to the instructor will affect the course grade adversely. Students should read the assigned readings before class meetings and prepare for class discussion. Contributions to the class discussion including prepared comments and energetic participation will be considered in your grade.

 

2) Two Book Reviews (20%)

Each student should choose two books which are relevant to his/her research concerns, and prepare reviews of 3-5 pages each typewritten and doubled-spaced. The book reviews should contain the following points:

  1. Information about the book (Author, book title, place, publisher, year and price)

  2. Subject of inquiry (the purpose of the research, the type of methodology, and the scope

      of the research)

  3. Content of the book

  4. Conclusion of the book

  5. Your commentary

 

According to your assigned schedule you will present them during our class.  

 

3) Research Paper and Presentation (50%)

The research paper should be typewritten and double spaced, and 25-30 pages in length. Students should use more than fifteen academic sources (academic journal articles and books). The topic should be taken from one of the issues and on empirical case studies or policy-relevant or theoretical issues that we have studied and discussed in class. The outline of the paper should be submitted before September 15, and approved by the instructor. The paper proposal should follow this guideline: 1. Paper Topic, 2. Research questions 3. Brief summary of your argument, and 4. References.   

 

 

Required Textbooks:

 

Bjorn Moller, Security, Arms Control and Defense Restructuring in East Asia

                      (Ashgate, 1998).

 

Christopher M. Dent, Asia-Pacific Economic and Security Cooperation

                       (Mcmillian, 2004).

 

Chalmers Johnson, Blowback: The Costs and Consequence of American Empire

                       (Metropolitan, 2000)

 

Desmond J. Ball, The Transformation of Security of the Asia/Pacific Region

                       (Taylor & Francis, 2005).

 

J.J. Suh, Rethinking Security in East Asia: Identity, Power, and Efficiency

                       (Stanford Univ. Press, 2004). 

 

John J. Mearsheimer, Tragedy of Great Power Politics

                       (Norton, W.W., 2002).

 

Leszek Buszynski, Asia Pacific Security: Values and Identity (Taylor & Francis, 2004).

 

Michael E. Brown, East Asian Security (MIT, 1996).

 

Michael Yahuda, International Politics of the Asia-Pacific: Since 1945

                         (Routledge, 2004).

Saiichi John Maruya, International Relations Theory and the Asia-Pacific

                         (MIT, 2003).

 

Samuel S. Kim, North Korea in Northeast Asia (Rowman & Littlefield, 2002).

 

Samuel S. Kim, The International Relations of Northeast Asia

                         (Rowman & Littlefield, 2003).

 

Ted Galen Carpenter and Doug Bandow, The Korean Conundrum: America’s Troubled

                         Relations with North & South Korea (Macmillan, 2004).

 

Roger Buckley, The United States in the Asia-Pacific: Conflict and Cooperation

                          (Cambridge University Press, 2002)

 

 

Journals:

 

Asian Survey

Asian Affairs

Asia-Pacific Review

Critical Asian Studies

International Relations of the Asia-Pacific

International Security

Journal of Asian Studies

Journal of Contemporary Asia

Journal of Contemporary China

Journal of East Asian Affairs

Pacific Affairs

The China Quarterly

 

 

 

Course Schedule and Reading Assignments

 

I. Theoretical Background of Security Study

 

Week 1 (Aug 25): Course Introduction  

 

Week 2 (Sep 1): Theoretical background of Security Study I (Traditional Approach)

- What is security study?

- Great power security

- Balance of Power

- Alliance

- Collective security

 

**Barry Buzan, “Security Architecture In Asia: The Interplay of Regional and Global Levels,” The Pacific Review 16, no. 2 (2003): 143-173.

*Stephen M. Walt, “The Renaissance of Security Studies,” International Studies Quarterly 35, no. 2 (June 1991).

*Stephen M. Walt, “Alliance Formation and the Balance of Power,” International Security 9, no. 4 (Spring 1985):

* Stephen M. Walt. “Alliance in Theory and Practice: What Lies Ahead?,” Journal of International Affair 43, no. 1 (Summer/Fall 1989).  

* Kenneth Waltz, Theory of International Politics (Reading, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1979), Chap. 6. Anarchic Orders and Balance of Power

* John J. Mearsheimer, The Tragedy of Great Power Politics (New York: W.W. Norton & Company), chap. 2. Anarchy and the Struggle for Power.

* Robert Gilpin, War and Change in International System.

* Robert Jervis, “An Imterim Assessment of September 11: What Has Changed and What Has Not?,” Political Science Quarterly 117, no. 1 (2002). 

* Robert Jervis, “Was the Cold War a Security Dilemma?,” Journal of Cold War Studies 3, no.1 (Winter 2001). 

* Philip G. Cerny, “Terrorism and the New Security Dilemma,” Naval War College Review 58, no. 1 (Winter 2005).

 

Week 3 (Sep 8):  Theoretical background of Security Study II (Constructivism) 

- Norm and identity

- Social construction

 

** Peter J. Katzenstein, ed. The Culture of National Security: Norms and Identity in World Politics (New York: Columbia University Press, 1996). Chap.1. Introduction: Alternative Perspectives on National Security, and Chap 2: Norms, Identity, and Culture in National Security.

** Ted Hopf, “The Promise of Constructivism in International Relation Theory,” International Security 23, no. 1 (summer 1998).

** Alexander Wendt, “Anarchy is What States Make of It: The Social Construction of Power Politics,” International Organization 46, no. 2 (Spring 1992). 

** Alexander Wendt, “Constructing International Politics,” International Security 20, no. 1 (Summer 1995).

 

* Leszek Buszynski, Asia Pacific Security: Values and Identity (Taylor & Francis, 2004).

 

II. Historical Background of East Asian Security

 

Week 4 (Sep 15): Cold War Period

- The Cold War, 1945 - 1989

- Korean War

- Vietnam War

- The U.S. and Asia- Pacific

- The Soviet Union/ Russia and the Asia-Pacific

- China and Asia-Pacific

- Japan and Asia-Pacific

 

** Roger Buckley, The United States in the Asia-Pacific: Conflict and Cooperation

   (Cambridge University Press, 2002). Chap. 1-4.

** Michael Yahuda, International Politics of the Asia-Pacific: Since 1945

     (Routledge, 2004). Chap. 1-7.

** Christopher M. Dent, ed., Asia-Pacific Economic and Security Co-operation (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002). Chap. 1-6.

* Bruce Cumings, The Origins of the Korean War Vols. 1 & 2 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1981, 1990). 

* Patrick Tyler, “The (Ab)normalization of US-Chinese Relations, Foreign Affairs (September/October 1999).

 

** Sep 15: Research Paper Proposal Due

 

 

Week 5 (Sep 22): Post-Cold War Period

- East Asian Security After the Cold War

- The U.S. and East Asia

- Rising China: China’s Threat to East Asian Security

- Japan’s National Security

- The Two Koreas: Coexistence

 

** Buckley, Chap. 5-7.

** Yahuda, Chap. 8-11.

** Michael E. Brown, East Asian Security (Boston: MIT, 1996). Part II & III.

** Mel Gurtov, Pacific Asia?: Prospects for Security and Cooperation in East Asia (Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2002). Chap. 1-2.

** Richard Betts, “Wealth, Power, and Instability: East Asia and the United States After the Cold War,” International Security 18, no. 3 (Winter 1993/94). 

** Richard Betts, “China: Getting The Question Right,” National Interest 62 (Winter2000/2001).
* Harry Harding, ed., China’s Foreign Relations in the 1980s (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1984).

* Gerald Curtis, ed., Japan’s Foreign Policy After the Cold War (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1993).

* David Hitchcock, “East Asia’s New Security Agenda,” Washington Quarterly 17, no. 1 (Winter 1994).

 

Week 6 (Sep 29): ISA-West Convention

 

III. Major Power Interactions 

 

Week 7 (Oct 6): The Security Dilemma in East Asia

** Thomas J. Christensen,China, the U.S.-Japan alliance, and the security dilemma in East Asia,” International Security 23, no. 4 (Spring 1999).

** Desmond Ball, “Arms and Affluence: Military Acquisitions in the Asia-Pacific Region,” International Security 18, no. 3 (Winter 93-94).

** Jae-Jung Suh, “The Two-Wars Doctrine and the Regional Arms Race: Contradictions in U.S. Post-Cold War Security Policy in Northeast Asia,” Critical Asian Studies 35, no. 1 (March 2003).

** David Shambaugh, “China’s Military View the World: Ambivalent Security,” International Security 24, no. 3 (Winter 99/2000)

** Robert S. Ross, “The Geography of the Peace: East Asia in the Twenty-first Century,” International Security 23, no. 4 (Spring 99).

** Michael Sheenan, “Creating an Arms Control Mechanism in North East Asia: The Application of the European Security Co-operation Regime,” Defense & Security Analysis 20, no. 1 (March 2004).

 

 

 

Week 8 (Oct 13): U.S. Strategic Concern in East Asia

** Department of Defense, US Security Strategy for the East Asia-Pacific region (November 1998). <http://www.defenselink.mil/pubs/easr98/easr98.pdf>

** Chalmers Johnson, Blowback: The Costs and Consequences of American Empire (Metropolitan, 2000).

 

** Jae-Jung Suh, “The Two-Wars Doctrine and the Regional Arms Race: Contradictions in U.S. Post-Cold War Security Policy in Northeast Asia,” Critical Asian Studies 35, no. 1 (2003). 

* Marie T. Huhtala, “United States and Asia Relation: The Next Four Years,” DISAM Journal of International Security Assistance Management 27, no.3 (Spring2005).

* Evans J. R Revere, “United States Interest and Strategic Goals in East Asia and the Pacific,” DISAM Journal of International Security Assistance Management 27, no.3 (Spring2005).

* F. Stephen Larrabee et al., “The Right Stuff,” National Interest (Fall 2004).

* Gerald Curtis, “East Asia, Regionalism and U.S. National interests: How Much Change?,” American Foreign Policy Interests 26, no. 3 (Jun 2004).

* Victor Pavliatenko, “US Policy in East Asia: Interest, Problems, and Prospects,” Far Eastern Affairs 30, no. 4 (2002).

* Michael J. Green, “The United States and East Asia in the Unipolar Era,” Journal of Strategic Studies 24, no. 4 (Dec 2001).
** Yahuda, Chap. 9.

** Gutov, Chap. 7.

 

 

Week 9 (Oct 20): China

** Richard Bernstein and Ross H. Munro, “The Coming Conflict with America,” Foreign Affairs 76, no. 2 (March/April 1997).

** Avery Goldstein, “Great Expectations: Interpreting China’s Arrival,” International Security (Winter 1997/98).

** Aileen San Pablo-Baviera, “The China Factor in US Alliance in East Asia and the Asia Pacific,” Australian Journal of International Affairs 57, no. 2 (July 2003).

** Barry Buzan, “Security Architecture in Asia: The Interplay of Regional and Global Levels,” Pacific Review 16, no. 2 (2003). 

** Alastair Iain Johnston, “Is China a Status Quo Power?,” International Security 27, no. 4 (Spring 2003).

** David C. Kang, “Getting Asia Wrong: The need for New Analytical Frameworks,” International Security 27, no. 4 (Spring 2003).

** Robert S. Ross, “Navigating the Taiwan Strait: Deterrence, Escalation Dominance, and U.S.-China Relations,” International Security 27, no. 2 (Sep 2002).

** Kenneth W. Allen, “China’s Foreign Military Relations with Asia-Pacific,” Journal of Contemporary China 10, no. 29 (Nov 2001).

** Russ Howard, “Discussion of The Chinese Security Concept and Its Historical Evolution,” Journal of Contemporary China 10, no. 27 (May 2001).

** Xia Liping, “China: a Responsible Great Power,” Journal of Contemporary China 10, no. 26 (Feb 2001).

** David Shambaugh, “China’s Military Views the World,” International Security 24, no. 3 (Winter 99/2000).

** Michael E. Brown et al., East Asian Security, Part II.

 

Week 10 (Oct 27): Japan

** Alan Dupont, “The Schizophrenic Superpower,” National Interest 79 (Spring 2005).

** Jennifer M. Lind, “Pacifism or Passing the Buck?: Testing Theories of Japanese Security Policy,” International Security 29, no. 1 (Summer 2004).

** Junichiro Koizumi, and Shigeru Ishiba, “Should Japan’s Self-Defense Forces Play a More Active Role in International Security? Junichiro Koizumi Pro,” International Debates 1, no. 6 (Sep 2003).

** Ichiro Ozawa, “Should Japan’s Self-Defense Forces Play a More Active Role in International Security? Ichiro Ozawa Con,” International Debates 1, no. 6 (Sep 2003).

** Anthony Difilippo, “How Tokyo's Security Policies Discount Japanese Public Opinion: Toward an Alternative Security Agenda,” Pacifica Review: Peace, Security & Global Change 14, no. 1 (Feb 2002).

** Peter J. Katzenstein and Nobuo Okawara, “Japan, Asian-Pacific Security, and the Case for Analytical Eclecticism,” International Security 26, no. 3 (Dec 2001).

** Paul Midford, “Japan's leadership role in East Asian security multilateralism: the Nakayama proposal and the logic of reassurance,” Pacific Review 13, no. 3 (Aug 2000).

** Eric Heginbotham and Richard J. Samuels, “Mercantile realism and Japanese foreign policy,” International Security 22, no. 4 (Spring 98).

** Denny Roy, “Hegemon on the horizon?,” International Security,19, no. 1 (Summer 94).

** Michael E. Brown et al., East Asian Security, Part III.

 

 

Week 11 (Nov 3): South and North Korea

** Victor Cha, “Hawk Engagement and Preventive Defense on the Korean Peninsula,” International Security 27, no. 1 (Jun 2002).

** Victor Cha, “Shaping Change in the Alliance,” East Asia: An International Quarterly 21, no. 2 (Summer 2004).

** Balbina Y. Hwang, “Introduction: The Rise of Korea,” East Asia: An International Quarterly 21, no. 2 (Summer 2004).

** Balbina Y. Hwang, “Anti-Americanism in Korea: Implications for the Future of the U.S.-ROK Alliance,” East Asia: An International Quarterly 20, no. 2 (Summer 2003).

** Seongho Sheen, “Grudging Partner: South Korea,” Asian Affairs: An American Review 30, no. 2 (Summer 2003).

** Gordon L. Flake, “The Future of Regional Security Cooperation, and Korea's Role,” East Asia: An International Quarterly 21, no. 2 (Summer 2004).

** Carl E. Haselden, Jr., “The Effects of Korean Unification on the US Military Presence in Northeast Asia,” US Army War College 32, no. 4 (Winter 2002-03).

 

** Michael O’Hanlon, “Stopping a North Korean invasion,” International Security 22, no. 4. (Spring 1998).

** Kongdan Oh and Ralph C. Hassig,”The North Korean Military as a Security Threat,” East Asia: An International Quarterly 20, no. 2 (Summer 2003).

** Ming Liu, “China and the North Korean Crisis: Facing Test and Transition,” Pacific Affairs 76, no. 3 (Fall 2003).
** Mel Gurtov, Pacific Asia?: Prospects for Security and Cooperation in East Asia, Chap. 6: The Two Koreas: Uneasy Coexistence.

** Ted Galen Carpenter and Doug Bandow, The Korean Conundrum: America’s Troubled                         Relations with North & South Korea (Macmillan, 2004).

** Doug Bandow, Tripwire: Korea and U.S. Foreign Policy in a Changed World (Cato, 1996).

 

 

IV. Current Hot Issues

 

Week 12 (Nov 10): North Korea’s Nuclear Weapons Program

** Victor Cha and David C. Kang, “Can North Korea be Engaged?: An Exchange between Victor D. Cha and David C. Kang,” Survival 46, no. 2 (Summer 2004).

** Victor D. Cha and David C. Kang, Nuclear North Korea: A Debate on Engagement Strategy (New York: Columbia University Press, 2003). 

** Selig S. Harrison, “Did North Korea Cheat?,” Foreign Affairs 84, no. 1 (January/Feburary 2005).

** Randall E. Newnham, “Nukes for Sale Cheap? Purchasing peace with North Korea,” International Studies Perspectives 5, no. 2 (May 2004).

** Nicholas Eberstadt, “The North Korean Nuclear Drama: Another "Twenty Years' Crisis"?,” East Asia: An International Quarterly 21, no. 2 (Summer 2004).

** Richard P. Cronin, “The North Korean Nuclear Threat and the U.S.-Japan Security Alliance: Perceived Interests, Approaches, and Prospects,” The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs 29, no. 1 (Winter 2005). 

** Terence Roehrig, “One Rogue State Crisis at a Time!”: The United States and North Korea’s Nuclear Weapons Program,” World Affairs 165, no. 4 (Spring 2003). 

** Michael O’Hanlon and Mike Mochizuki, “Toward a Grand Bargain with North Korea,” The Washington Quarterly 26, no. 4 (Autumn 2003).

 

Week 13 (Nov 17): International Political Economy Perspective

** Paul Krugman, “The Myth of Asia’s Miracle,” Foreign Affairs (Nov/Dec 1994). 

** C. Fred Bergsten, “APEC and World Trade,” Foreign Affairs (May/Jun 1994).

** Paul Dibb et al., “The strategic implications of Asia's economic crisis,” Survival 40, no. 2 (Summer 98).    

** Saiichi John Maruya, International Relations Theory and the Asia-Pacific                       (MIT, 2003). Chap. 8: State, Markets, and Great Power Relations, Chap. 10: Economic Interdependence and the Future of U.S.-Chinese Relations.

** T. J. Pempel, Remapping East Asia: The Construction of a Region (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2004).

** Samuel S. Kim, The International Relations of Northeast Asia, Chap 3 & 5.

 

** Kag Zeng, “Complementary Trade Structure and U.S.-China Negotiation Over Intellectual Property Rights,” East Asia: An International Quarterly 20, no. 1 (Spring 2002).

** Nagi-Ling Sum, “Informational Capitalism and U.S. Economic Hegemony: Resistance and Adaptations in East Asia,” Critical Asian Studies 35, no. 3 (Sep 2003).

 

Week 14: Thanksgiving

 

Nov 29: Research Paper Due

 

Week 15 – 16 (Dec. 1 & 8) Research Paper Presentation.

 

 

 

                                                                                Thank You.