POLITICAL SCIENCE 285-2: PROBLEMS OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

 

                                                                                 FALL 2004

 

NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY

 

T-TH 9:30~11:50 A.M.

 

INSTRUCTOR: ADRIANA CROCKER

 

 

Office: ZU 420                                                                                    Classroom:  DU 461

Phone: 753-7057                                                                                Office Hours: T-TH 11.00 A.M.-

ampcrocker@comcast.net                                                                   12:00 P.M. or by appointment.                                                                     

 

 

 

 

COURSE DESPCRIPTION

 

 Welcome to the ever-changing world of international relations.  In the last decade of the 20th century,  the world experienced unexpected changes in both the political and economic realms.  The collapse of communism and a wave of  democratization in an ever increasing globalized world, predisposed many political leaders to favor economic and political cooperation, instead of implementing the more common Cold War strategies  of competition and the threat or  use of military power to solve disputes.  However, the turn of a new century, also brought increasing violence and resentment among peoples and as a result,  a change in international relations: today the world seems once again,  to be prioritizing  the concepts of national security and military might. What should we expect in the near the future?  A peaceful road to international cooperation, pervasive conflict, or a confusing and unpredictable future that falls somewhere in between the two other alternatives?   

 

Ø      This course has three primary objectives.   First, as an introductory course , it will study and discuss a number of theories and approaches to help interpret international relations.  Because international relations remains a divided field, the course will emphasize a number of competing theories, approaches, and models that will help the students understand the world from different perspectives.  This information will be presented through lecture.  There is also material covered by Kegley and Wittkopf required textbook. However, students should take thorough notes of the information presented in class to complement what is covered in the textbook.

 

Ø      The second objective of the course is to help students develop their abilities to think and argue logically.  Accordingly, we will analyze a number of  Pew and KSG case studies.  We will employ a number of highly participatory methods including: class discussions, small group exercises, and simulations. To facilitate and coordinate these discussions, the instructor will provide students with a set of  questions.  It will then be the responsibility of the students to consolidate their ideas and present them to class in an open forum.    

 

Ø      In addition, we will also be using the New York Times as a way to discuss contemporary events.  Each  Tuesday, at the beginning of class, students will be asked to introduce news stories related to international relations.   Class members will be required to offer a brief summary of the newspaper article, and to either offer an interpretation or draw a connection between the report and the theories or models presented in class.

 

Ø      The third objective of the class is for students to become more familiar with the concepts or theories presented in class, through the analysis of some of the most serious problems now facing the world.  Some of the problems that will be introduced in the later part of the semester are terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, ethnic nationalism, globalization and the environment , nuclear proliferation, and international organizations. Under each of these units students will be asked to read at least a study case dealing with the topic of study.

 

Overall, I hope students will leave the course with the ability to identify the theoretical perspectives and concepts that underlie various arguments made about international relations and to use these theoretical models critically when attempting to understand world events.

 

 

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIALS

 

  The required textbook and the Pew case studies are available for purchase at the university bookstore. 

 

1.      Charles W. Kegley, Jr. and Eugene R. Wittkopf, World Politics: Trends and Transformation, 8th ed., New York: St. Martin’s press, 2001

 

2.      Case studies.  ( Most cases are also available for individual use at FML, reserve room).

 

3.      Daily edition of the New York Times.  Available free of cost at www.nytimes.com .  You must register and select a password to access the website.  There is also a reduced rate subscription for students who prefer to receive a daily copy of the newspaper. For a hard copy of the newspaper, contact 1-800-NYTIMES or 1-800-698-4637. A hard copy of the newspaper is also available at the library.

 

 

 

 

GRADED REQUIREMENTS

 

 

Ø      There are three required written assignments for this class.  The first is written examinations.  There will be a midterm and a final exam.  The midterm will be given on Thursday,  October 14. The final exam will be administered on Thursday,  December 9.

Ø      Second, there is the completion of two current event journals.  The first journal will be submitted on September 23, at the beginning of class. It will include 8 journal entries with a summary of each article appearing in the New York Times. The second current event journal will be due on November 23, at the beginning of class and will include 16 new entries.  The first current event paper will count as 10 percent of the course grade.  The second will be worth 15 percent of the total grade. A summary of the  requirements to complete these assignments is discussed on page 11 of the syllabus.

Ø      Third, there will be a short critical essay due on December 2, at the beginning of class. This essay of five to seven pages long will consist of a more in depth discussion of a topic discussed in your journal. The essay should follow approximately the format of a Pew/KSG case discussion. (See page 10 for a more thorough discussion of this assignment).

Ø      Fourth, class participation will contribute to 10 percent of the total grade.  Participation means regular attendance. More than four absences, or more than two cases-for whatever reason- will have a deduction taken from the participation grade.

 

In general, relevant in-class participation will be evaluated according to the following scale:

 

A= regular and thoughtful participation

B= occasional and thoughtful participation

C= regular attendance

D=less than regular attendance

F=little or no attendance

 

There may also be a number of quizzes on case discussion days that will count as part of the final participation grade.  To reward those students keeping up with the material, the final grade for quizzes will be based on class average.  Students with a B+ to A average will have their participation final grade raised one half letter.  Individuals with a B to C- will not have their participation final grade changed.  Class members with an average quiz grade of D+ to F will have their participation grade lowered half a letter. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COMPONENTS OF FINAL GRADE

 

 

 

MIDTERM EXAM =  25 PERCENT           PAPER 1   = 10 PERCENT

 

FINAL EXAM        =  25 PERCENT            PAPER 2  =  15 PERCENT

 

PARTICIPATION   = 10 PERCENT            CRITICAL ESSAY=15 PERCENT

 

 

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY:  Plagiarism is the most serious form of academic cheating.   The NIU undergraduate catalog states: “ students are guilty of plagiarism, intentional or not, if they copy material from books, magazines, or other sources without identifying and acknowledging them.  Students guilty of, or assisting others in, either cheating or plagiarism on an assignment, quiz, or examination may receive a grade of F for the course involved and may be suspended or dismissed from the university.”   If  students wish to do some library research to support their analytical essays for the class , they must remember to observe proper rules of citation.

 

 

COURSE SCHEDULE AND READING ASSIGNMENTS

 

 

IMPORTANT DATES:

 

Midterm exam: October 14 

First Journal Due: September 23 

Second Journal Due: November 23

Critical essay due:  December 2

Final Exam: December 9

 

 

WEEK 1

 

 August 24

 

·        Course introduction and distribution of syllabus.

·        Distribution of Melian dialogue

 

             

August 26
 
·        THE MELIAN DIALOGUE.  

 

 

WEEK 2

 

September 31

 

·        Discussion of  current events (New York Times).

·        II. Theories of International Relations

( read : Kegley and Wittkopf, chpts. 1-2)

 

September 2

 

·        Realism

( Read : Kegley and Wittkopf : chpt. 2, pp. 31-35 and  chpt. 14 pp. 531-539 and 541-553).

 

 
WEEK 3

 

September 7

 

·        Discussion of current events (New York Times).

·        Neo-realism ( Kegley and Wittkopf, 35-38)

 

September 9

 

·        B.PEW CASE #170 A-  VALUES VS. INTERESTS: THE US RESPONSE TO TIANANMEN SQUARE.

 

 
WEEK 4

 

September 14

 

·        Discussion of current events ( New York Times).

·        Liberal idealism ( Kegley and Wittkopf, chpt. 2 ,pp. 28-31, ch. 14 pp. 539-541).

 

September 16

 

·        Neo-liberalism ( Kegley and Wittkopf, pp. 38-44, chpt. 15 pp. 569-578 and pp. 603-608).

·        Constructivism and Critical approaches ( chpt. 2 pp. 49-55 and chpt. 7 pp. 249-253).

WEEK 5

 

September 21  

 

·        Discussion of current events (New York Times).

·        III. Theories of foreign policy decision-making: A- Individual level models of decision-making: The Rational-Actor Model ( Chapter 3  pp. pp. 69-79 )

 

September 23

 

·        B- Group Level models of decision-making:  Organizational Process and Bureaucratic Politics Models.  ( Read Kegley and Wittkopf, chpt. 3, pp.80-88).

 

 

**first Journal Submission is due at the beginning of class.

 

 

WEEK6

 

September 28 

 

·        Discussion of current events.

·        C. KSG # 279 :  KENNEDY AND THE BAY OF PIGS

 

 September 30

 

·        Crisis Decision-Making and Groupthink (Read Kegley and Wittkopf, chpt. 3, pp. 87-93).

·        * Video: Groupthink.

* These are not “blow-off” classes.  Some of the exam questions may be based on audiovisual material

 

 
WEEK 7

 

October 5

 

·        Discussion of Current events

·        IV  Theories of Political Economy:  Free Market Economy  ( read Kegley and Wittkopf, chpt. 9 pp. 303-310 and 319-332).

 

October 7
 
·        Mercantilism/Neo-mercantilism and Marxism/Neo-Marxism. ( Read Kegley and Wittkopf chpt. 9 pp. 310-313  and 335-337 & chpt. 6 pp. 196-197. 202-207,  210-212 and 216)

 

·        D. PEW CASE 239 PART A: “SWEATING THE SWOOSH: NIKE, THE GLOBALIZATION OF SNEAKERS. AND THE QUESTION OF SWEATSHOP LABOR. 

 

 

WEEK 8

 

October 12

 

·        Discussion of current events.

·        Midterm examination review

 

October 14

 

Midterm examination!!

 
 
WEEK 9
 
October 19 

·         Discussion of Current events.

·         V: Problems of international Relations

1.      Ethnicity and Nationalism. ( read Kegley and Wittkopf, chpt. 7, pp. 227-262, chpt. 11: pp.408-411).

 

             October 21

 

·        E. PEW CASE # 374 A- WATERSHED IN RWANDA: THE EVOLUTION OF PRESIDENT CLINTON’S

 

 

            

WEEK 10
 
October 26

 

·         Discussion of Current events.

2.        Terrorism ( Red Kegley and Wittkopf, chpt.11 pp.433-448).

 

 
 
October 28

 

·         F. KSG CASE: SEEKING THE EXTRADITION OF MOHAMMED RASHID.

·         VIDEO: LOOKING FOR ANSWERS ( IF AVAILABLE)

 

 

WEEK 11

 

November 2

·        Discussion of current events

·        G. KSG PART A: THE ACHILLE LAURO HIJACKING

 

November 4

 

·         3. Weapons of Mass Destruction and Nuclear Proliferation.  ( Read : Kegley and Wittkopf, chpt. 12, pp.407-435, chpt. 13 and chpt. 14, 553-567

 

 

 

WEEK 12
 
November 9

 

·        Discussion of current events

·        H. PEW CASE #359- ATOMIC DIPLOMACY IN THE KOREAN WAR.

 
November 11

 

·        PEW CASE #228A- UP IN ARMS: RUSSIAN ROCKETS FOR INDIA.

 

 
WEEK 13

 

November 16

 

·         Discussion of current events.

·        4. The U.N and International Organizations. ( read Kegley and Wittkopf, chpt 15).

·        Video: About the United Nations (18 minutes)

 

 

 

November 18

                

·        PEW CASE  # 258.  ESTABLISHING AN INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT: THE EMERGENCE OF A NEW GLOBAL AUTHORITY?

 
 
 
WEEK 14 

 

November 23

 

·        Discussion of current events

·        5. The Global Environment.  ( Read Kegley and Wittkopf,   chpts. 8 pp. 265 282  and  chpt. 10).

·        Video: if available

 

Second Journal due today at the beginning of class!!

 
November 25
 
 HAPPY THANKSGIVING!!!

 

 

WEEK 15 

 

November 30

 

·        PEW CASE 225 PART A: “A NOTABLE SUCCESS OR TOO MANY LOOPHOLES? JAPAN AND THE KYOTO PROTOCOL ON CLIMATE CHANGE.

 

December 2

 

·         Final examination Review

 

          Critical essay due today at the beginning of class !!!!

 
 
WEEK16

 

 THURSDAY DECEMBER 9  

 

 FINAL EXAMINATION, 10:00-11:50 A.M.  461 DU SABLE ROOM

 

 

 

GUIDELINES FOR CRITICAL ESSAY

 

 

 THE GOAL OF THE PAPER:  The purpose of this assignment is to write an analytical paper where you will discuss an issue previously addressed in your journal and mirror the cases used in class.

A good paper requires the following elements:

 

1.      It should be creative, well written, and carefully constructed.

 

2.      It should identify a particular decision-maker, the dilemma he/she faces, a clear statement of the objectives of the decision maker, and some discussion of at least two alternative courses of action that the decision-maker might adopt. In the closing statement the student also should include the alternative he/she considers more appropriate for the decision-maker to take.

 

3.      Students should select an event or issue to analyze based on news articles from the New York Times or another paper or record the instructor has approved.  The paper should include at least three related newspaper articles on the selected topic.  So, you should follow a given topic/event carefully throughout the semester.  You could also include other bibliographical sources such as on-line news, books, or academic journals.

 

  

4.      Papers should be at least five to seven word-processed pages.  The pages should be double spaced, approximately 12 font, and contain one- inch margins.  The paper should have a bibliography.  Endnotes, in-text notes, or footnotes are also required.  Use a citation method such as APA or MLA.  A quote must always appear in quotation marks. 

 

 

5.      GRADE: The paper is worth 15 percent of the final course grade. The grade will be based upon the following components: 1)  A thesis statement that introduces the reader to the paper. 2) A body where evidence is presented to support the thesis.  3) A conclusion that summarizes the argument and evidence presented in the paper. 4) Quality :  a) the paper  should be analytically sound.  It should explain the logic behind a statement and offer evidence to demonstrate why the statement is in fact true;  b) as mentioned above,  the paper should also be well written and carefully constructed.

 

6.      Because this is a course of international relations, cases taken from a perspective other than an American one are especially encouraged.

 

 

CURRENT EVENT JOURNALS

 

 

 

 

There are two current event journals due the first one, on September 23, and the second one, on December 23. The FIRST current event journal will include 8 neatly clipped newspaper entries from the New York Times or other newspaper approved by the instructor.  The SECOND one will include 16 entries from the same sources.  Both journals should indicate the title, author, date and source for each article. Accompanying each article should be a well-written, well-developed paragraph ( of at least six to eight sentences) that reacts to or analyzes the selected news story.  For instance,  a journal entry can tie a selected article to a course reading, draw a connection to a theory or concept discussed in class, relate the article’s significance to present or future international relations, or convey how a policy maker should address a given international relations issue.  Whatever approach is selected, the paragraph must exhibit independent thinking and be well constructed or thought out. The goal of the journal is to share one’s thoughts or information learned from class rather than to repeat what the article says.  All journal entries should be word-processed and related to international relations. The exact way in which the journal is assembled and presented for submission is for each student to decide.  However, the written entries for each journal should be representative of the entire term up to the journals’ due date instead of simply a few weeks. The first assignment is worth 10 percent of the final grade.  The second journal is worth 15 percent of the final grade.

 

 

LOOSE ENDS

 

 

(1)   Makeup Exams:  Makeup exams will only be given in extraordinary circumstances.  If such circumstances arise, please contact the instructor as soon as possible and before the scheduled exam.  To keep the process fair for everyone in the course, students may be asked to support request for makeup exams with documentation.  A missed final examination without prior notification and a documented excuse will result in zero and a grade of “F” as opposed to an incomplete.

(2)   Late Papers: A writing assignment submitted after due date will be penalized by a deduction of five points or half a letter grade per day.  There will be no exceptions to this rule.  Therefore students with sick relatives, paper-eating canines, low-life typists, or ill-tempered computers, are strongly encouraged to compensate for any mishaps by preparing their assignments in advance of the papers’ deadlines.

(3)   Submitting Papers: Assignments should be handed in to me personally, or given to a department secretary to be time-stamped.  Assignments placed under my office door or sent with a friend tend to disappear at times.  If a student selects one of these modes of delivery, he or she does so at their own risk.

(4)   Extra Credit:  Extra credit assignments will not be given on an individual basis to raise final course grades.  Like make-up exams, such projects raise serious questions of equity.  In the unlikely event such a project is made available, every member of the class will be given the opportunity to complete it.

(5)   Handouts:  Handouts, including study guides, are a privilege for those students who attend class on a regular basis.  No student is entitled to supplemental materials simply because they are registered for the course.

(6)   Incomplete Requests:  Such petitions will be granted rarely and only in extraordinary circumstances.  The instructor reserves the right to ask for documentation to verify the problem preventing completion of the course by the normal deadlines.  If the student does not present documentation from a university office or official, the matter will be left to the instructor’s discretion.

(7)   Unannounced Quizzes:  The instructor reserves the right to conduct additional pop quizzes, if it becomes grossly apparent through class discussions that students are not completing the assigned readings on a regular basis.  If such quizzes are administered, they will be averaged to raise or lower a student’s final course grade by half letter grade.  Whether a particular student’s grade is adjusted positively or negatively will be dependent on a class average.  It will not be done capriciously.

(8)    Undergraduate Writing Awards:  The Department of Political Science will recognize, on an annual basis, outstanding undergraduate papers written in conjunction with 300-400 level political science courses or directed studies.  Authors do not have to be political science majors or have a particular class standing.  Winners are expected to attend the Department’s spring graduation ceremony where they will receive a certificate and $ 50.00, which can be submitted by students or faculty,  must be supplied  in triplicate to a Department’s Secretary by February 28.   All copies should have two cover pages – one with the student’s name and one without the student’s name-.  Only papers written in the previous calendar year can be considered for the award.

(9)   Statement Concerning Students with Disabilities:  Under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, NIU is committed to make it reasonable accommodations for person with documented disabilities.  Those students with disabilities that may have some impact in the coursework and for which they may require accommodations should notify the Center for Access-Ability Resources (CAAR) on the fourth flour of the Health Services Building. CAAR will assist students in making appropriate accommodations with course instructors.  It is important that CAAR and instructors be informed of any disability-related needs during the first two weeks of the semester.

(10)           Department of Political Science Web Site: undergraduates are strongly encouraged to consult the Department of Political Science web site on a regular basis. This up-to-date, central source of information will assist students in contacting faculty and staff, reviewing course requirements and syllabi, exploring graduate study, researching career options, tracking department events, and accessing important details related to undergraduate programs and activities.  To reach the site, go to http://polisci.niu.edu