NGOLD Faculty Associates

NGOLD Faculty Associates

The following NIU faculty play an important role in advancing NGOLD's mission through their work on committees, by partnering on events, and contibuting to the Center's growth. Many of these faculty also teach interdisciplinary courses that go toward completion of the Community Leadership and Civic Engagement major and the Certificate of Undergraduate Study in Civic Engagement.

 

Abu BahAbu Bakarr Bah

Associate Professor
Department of Sociology

Bio: I am an Associate Professor of Sociology and a Faculty Associate of NGOLD. I am the author of Breakdown and Reconstitution: Democracy, the Nation-State, and Ethnicity in Nigeria and Editor-in-Chief of African Conflict & Peacebuilding Review. Some of my most recent works have been published in African Affairs, Critical Sociology, International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society, Ethnic Studies Review, Journal of Political and Military Sociology and Democracy & Development: Journal of West African Affairs. My current research is on peace and conflict, international humanitarian interventions and postwar reconstruction. I am particularly interested in the works of international NGOs and intergovernmental organizations (e.g. UN, IMF, AU, ECOWAS, etc.) to promote human security, human development, and democracy in developing countries. I teach graduate and undergraduate sociological theory classes and seminar courses on migration, social institutions and democracy and development. I also direct the study abroad program to Sierra Leone, West Africa. My undergraduate studies were at Sofia University in Bulgaria and my doctoral work was at the New School for Social Research in New York.
 


Ben BingleBen Bingle

Outreach Coordinator & Instructor
Center for NGO Leadership and Development

Bio: I am the NGOLD outreach coordinator and a CLCE instructor. I have taught Introduction to Community Leadership and Civic Engagement (CLCE 100), Capstone Seminar in Community Leadership and Civic Engagement (CLCE 495), and Independent Study in Community Leadership and Civic Engagement (CLCE 498). Previously, I held various positions within Iowa-based microenterprise development organizations. In these roles, I managed local, statewide, and national programs, administered grant funding, directed outcomes evaluation efforts, and contributed to the procurement of more than $1.3 million in grant, earmark, and contract funds. Prior to assuming my current position, I worked as a study director conducting social science research with the Public Opinion Laboratory at NIU. I serve on the Ellwood House Museum board of directors and the DeKalb County Nonprofit Partnership steering committee. I am currently pursuing a PhD in political science. My research interests center on institutions, representation, bureaucracy, legislative size and the efficacy of nonprofit organizations.


Nancy CastleNancy Castle

Professor & Director
Center for NGO Leadership and Development

Bio: A longtime interest in service–learning has lead to my teaching courses that place students and community partners together including “Class Meets Community” honors seminars and CLCE courses on community and civic engagement. One of my research interests is the relationship between service-learning and development of civic engagement academic programs. Another interest is the role of NGOs in the disability rights movement and in the delivery of services to people with disabilities in the U.S. and other countries. I am able to draw on a 30 year career in disability services and am planning a study abroad program on this topic. I share my time with the Office of Student Engagement and Experiential Learning as the faculty resource for service-learning. I have directed several nonprofits and have served on nonprofit boards and am currently the Vice President of the Kishwaukee United Way and a member of the Board of Directors for the Harper College Educational Foundation.


Anne Hanley

Associate Professor & Director of Graduate Studies
Department of History


Trude JacobsenTrude Jacobsen

Associate Professor & Assistant Director of Center for Southeast Asian Studies
Department of History

Bio: I assist students taking the CLCE capstone course with specific research projects in my areas of expertise, namely the gender and development, trafficking, human rights and ethnic conflict in Southeast Asia. Since 2011, I have been the Assistant Director at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies where I work with students hoping to join the public sector or NGOs in Southeast Asia on placements and experiential learning. I participated in the Southeast Asia Youth Leadership Program (SEAYLP) at NIU 2009-2012, in which Southeast Asian high school students visit the US and engage with local and federal agencies and individuals on civic responsibility and good governance training. Prior to teaching, I worked for the United Nations and continue to consult for U.S. state agencies and international and private organizations on gender and development, capacity building, project management and advocacy for minority rights, particularly in Cambodia and Burma.


Jack King

Internship Placement Coordinator
Department of Sociology


Judy LedgerwoodJudy Ledgerwood

Professor & Director of Center for Southeast Asian Studies
Department of Anthropology


Melissa Lenczewski

Associate Professor & Director of Institute for the Study of the Environment, Sustainability and Energy
Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences


Kirk Miller

Professor & Chair
Department of Sociology


Andrea MolnarAndrea Molnar

Professor
Department of Anthropology

Bio: I am a cultural anthropologist trained in Canada and Australia. I have worked with NGOs in Indonesia, Timor-Leste (East Timor), and in Southern Thailand in various capacities—as partner/consultant in development projects focusing on environment, biodiversity conservation, traditional land rights, tropical agriculture, health, education, gender; and as provider of training workshops on peace and conflict issues. My main research interests in NGOs takes a political anthropology perspective and I focus on the political roles and motivations of NGOs, and understand the interactions of local-national-global NGOs relationally to each other. In the past, my work also needed to take a kinship/social organization and religion perspective as traditional religious beliefs and practices were at the core of sustainability of various development projects. My current research in Southern Thailand focuses on Muslim women’s political engagement through local civil society and southern Thai NGO’s roles in peace building efforts in this conflict torn region. The role of religion in the region is politically highly charged and my research focuses to a greater extent on NGOs among the Malay ethnic Muslim minority population. I am one of the faculty members who teach Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (ANTH 220) and I also teach Political Anthropology (ANTH 426), Anthropology of Religion (ANTH 328), Religion and Cosmology of Southeast Asia (ANTH 628/491), Muslim Cultures in Anthropological Perspective (ANTH 304), Ritual and Myth (ANTH 428) and Social Organization (ANTH 421).


Sue RussellSue Russell

Professor
Department of Anthropology

Bio: I am a cultural anthropologist and am one of the professors who teach the required Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (ANTH 220) and Anthropology & Contemporary World Problems (ANTH 329) courses. I also teach two courses in the Global Emphasis: Globalization and Corporate Cultures (ANTH 363) and Economic Anthropology (ANTH 427). These courses are designed to equip CLCE students with a strong understanding of cultural diversity and the wide range of global problems that NGOs address in their advocacy. For the last ten years, I and Lina Ong (Director of the International Training Office) have been directing programs involving youth and NGO leaders from the southern Philippines and in the Chicago area to learn skills of conflict resolution, peacebuilding and civic leadership. I am currently conducting a three-year research project on peacebuilding and human rights NGOs on the island of Mindanao in the Philippines, working through the network of people trained in our projects.


Alicia SchattemanAlicia Schatteman

Assistant Professor
Division of Public Administration and NGOLD Joint Appointment

Bio: I teach CLCE and PSPA courses to support the CLCE major.  My courses are generally around the topic of nonprofit management, specifically how to manage their resources be they financial, human or technological.  My research interests support my teaching so I conduct research around the notion of nonprofit performance, financial sustainability and performance outcomes that support decision-making and strategic planning. I have presented my research at conferences in the United States, Canada, France and Ireland. I am also interested in how nonprofits use technology to carry out their missions, which led to the development of CLCE 350. I believe in engaged learning opportunities for my students and usually include some component of community research and/or community service in my classes. I serve on the NIU Presidential Commission on the Status of Women and the DeKalb County Nonprofit Partnership. Outside of the university, I work with several nonprofit organizations to support their strategic planning efforts. Prior to my doctoral degree, I worked in the nonprofit sector most recently as Executive Director of a cultural organization in New Jersey.


Scot SchraufnagelScot Schraufnagel

Associate Professor & Director of Graduate Studies
Department of Political Science

Bio: I am the director of graduate studies for the Department of Political Science. My research and teaching specialties are the U.S. Congress, political parties, elections and state government, with an emphasis on promoting a civil, representative and effective governing processes. I have a broad interest in institutional effectiveness and policy making, with a particular academic focus on legislative innovation. My published works have dealt with specific public policy innovations, institutional arrangements that promote effective elections (worldwide), partisan difference in the U.S. Congress and the factors associated with productive legislatures. My recent interest in NGOs parallels my broader interest in good government. Growth in the non-governmental sector has created a shift in responsibility for the well-being of non-elites away from government toward NGOs. Consequent to this movement, my research programs are shifting in the direction of studying NGO success.


Mark SchullerMark Schuller

Assistant Professor
Department of Anthropology and NGOLD Joint Appointment

Bio: I am an Assistant Professor of Anthropology and NGO Leadership Development at Northern Illinois University and an affiliate at the Faculté d’Ethnologie, l’Université d’État d’Haïti. Supported by the National Science Foundation and others, my research on globalization, NGOs, gender, and disasters in Haiti has been published in twenty book chapters and peer-reviewed articles as well as public media, including a column in Huffington PostI am the author of Killing with Kindness: Haiti, International Aid, and NGOs (Rutgers, 2012) and co-editor of three volumes, including Tectonic Shifts: Haiti Since the Earthquake (Kumarian Press, 2012). I am the co-director/co-producer of documentary Poto Mitan: Haitian Women, Pillars of the Global Economy (Documentary Educational Resources, 2009). I also chair the Society for Applied Anthropology’s Human Rights and Social Justice Committee, serve on several boards, and am active in many solidarity efforts. For NGOLD, I teach several courses for the CLCE major and am part of an effort to organize the "Future of NGO Studies Conference" in November.


Julia SpearsJulia Spears

Director
Office of Student Engagement and Experiential Learning

Bio: I am the Director of the Office of Student Engagement and Experiential Learning (OSEEL) which helps coordinate CLCE's Themed Learning Community. OSEEL also connects students to undergraduate research opportunities and encourages student participation in service learning and other civic engagement programs. I have a longstanding commitment to supporting students, particularly first generation college students, to be involved in their community. I have 20 years of experience helping students navigate the educational process both in higher education and in nonprofit organizations that focus on youth development. My areas of research include: student engagement and engaged learning, undergraduate research programs and graduate school transition issues. I am active in many committees on campus and look forward to helping students get the most out of their CLCE major.


Kurt ThurmaierKurt Thurmaier

Professor & Director
Division of Public Administration


Kendall Thu

Professor & Chair
Department of Anthropology