Online Courses

Spring 2016

January 18 - May 15, 2016

Online Courses

REGISTRATION | COSTS | LOCATION | OFF-CAMPUS COURSESONLINE COURSES

Course Descriptions
ANTH | BIOS | ECON | ENGL | ENVS | GEOG | ILAS | POLS | PSYC | SOCI | STAT | WGST


 

Food, Culture, and Globalization
ANTH 491/591: YE1, Class #s 7479/7483
(Combined with ENVS 491 YE1)

Explore the interrelationships among agriculture, political economy, food and culture that underlie the question of food security throughout the world. In 2013, the United Nations predicted that we must increase our arable, food-producing land by 50% by 2050 to be able to feed the world, yet at the same time, arable land is currently declining due to climate change, water shortages, land management policies, urbanization, and civil warfare. This class will examine cultural production of diet, the significance of globalization in putting pressure on local food systems, the problem of food security and potential solutions to the problem. The production, consumption, and distribution of food in relationship to food security will be addressed from an ecological and critical anthropological approach emphasizing food insecurity and hunger as a preventable problem, but one that must be addressed globally now.

Catalog Description: May be repeated to a maximum of 9 semester hours. PRQ: Consent of department.

Kristen Borre (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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Native Americans and the Law
ANTH 491: YE2, Class # 7480

Explore the diverse cultures and rich history of Native Americans. We will discuss key concepts and events in Native American history since the establishment of the United States of America. We will also delve into the changing views of cultural stewardship, museums’ role in artifacts and repatriation, and recent events and case studies. We will survey cultures of the native peoples of North America, and the contemporary issues of various US laws and statutes. This course will be web-based with 3 face-to-face meetings, and will use a combination of online modules, lectures, text readings, videos, activities, and ongoing group discussions. Students will also explore a local museum exhibit that relates to the course and create a report on their experience.

Catalog Description: May be repeated to a maximum of 9 semester hours. PRQ: Consent of department.

Karly Tumminello (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-Naperville, Wednesdays, 01/27, 03/23 and 04/27, 6 - 8:30 pm.

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Evolution and the Creationist Challenge
BIOS 442/542: YE1, Class #s 7481/7482

The perennial culture war raging in the USA is expressed in many areas of society. What group more than any other, is trying to underfund scientific research in general, and specifically in areas like climate change and stem cell research? It is the same group that is attacking sex education, the teaching of evolution, pushing Bible studies in the public schools, and trying to abolish abortion, not fund Planned Parenthood, control your reproductive rights, etc. It’s the fundamentalist Christians. They are trying to control your personal, and academic freedoms. Had enough?

BIOS 442/542 primarily deals with the constant attacks on academic freedom, especially the teaching of biological evolution, but also deals to a lesser degree with geological and cosmological evolution. This course will introduce students to the history of the “controversy” between science and religion, define the opposition, and examine where they get their ideas, and what they believe. We will cover Genesis in great detail, and discuss other religious beliefs. This is not an anti-fundamentalist Protestantism course, in a hundred years it may be fundamentalist Catholics battling Islam: it is a course designed to aid students to think logically, and defend science and all intellectual freedom from attacks by any group. It is just that now, the main opposition is from religion, not from the state, industry, or any controversy within the scientific community (as they would have us believe).

Philosophy of science will be covered in enough detail that students can separate science from non-science (and nonsense). We will discuss the process of biological evolution in enough intrusions into the public school system. Videos of national debates will be studied in order to aid you in debating these topics. This course is complementary to a biology course in evolution, it does not require one as a prerequisite, and it can be taken by any upper-level undergraduate or graduate, in any major, who has an interest in science and society. There are no prerequisites.

Catalog Description: Evolutionary theory and tenets of present-day anti-evolutionists with emphasis on providing students with the skills to articulate the theory of evolution as it applies to the biological sciences. Not a substitute for a formal course in evolutionary theory. Recommended for students pursuing careers in secondary science education.

Ron Toth (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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Income Distribution & Poverty
ECON 372: YE1, Class # 7485

This course will examine the theory of income, inequality, discrimination and wealth. It will include an analysis and measurement of welfare, poverty and an evaluation of the efficiency of public policy.

Catalog Description: Introduction with emphasis on conditions in the United States, past and present. Understanding the link between inequality and the performance of an economy is an integral part of understanding the very process of development and the effects of different policies. Introduction to the complex issues facing policy makers. PRQ: ECON 260.

Sowjanya Dharmasankar (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 2 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-Naperville, Saturdays, 02/06, 10 - 11 am and 04/09, 10 am - 1 pm.

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Technical Writing
ENGL 308: YE1, Class # 7486

In this fully online class, students will study the principles and strategies for planning, writing, and revising technical documents common in government, business, and industry. Some of the topics covered in this class are audience analysis and purpose, writing effectively, simplifying complex information, writing instructions, and document design.

The class will “meet” in Blackboard Learn where students will find video lectures, video demonstrations, assignment information, discussion boards, and a journal space. Students will also use an online space provided by the textbook publisher to watch video presentations, complete exercises related to the weekly reading assignment, and take quizzes.

The e-textbook Technical Communication, 10th edition (2012), by Mike Markel, is included in the online course space, YourTechCommClass. An access code can be purchased at the University Bookstore and VCB. It can also be purchased online at http://courses.bfwpub.com/yourtechcommclass/student-access.php. Students can also register their access code at this address.

Catalog Description: Principles and strategies for planning, writing, and revising technical documents common in government, business, and industry (e.g., manuals, proposals, procedures, newsletters, brochures, specifications, memoranda, and formal reports). Topics include analysis of audience and purpose, simplifying complex information, document design, and project management.

Jan Knudsen (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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Recent Western Literature
ENGL 339: YE1, Class # 7487

This course will introduce you to a selction of European literary works, ranging in publication from 1864 (Notes from Underground) to 1984 (The Lover). The title of this course may at first appear misleading: these works are “recent” in the larger scope and rich tradition of literary history; they are “western” in a global sense (as opposed to Japanese or Indian literature, for example), but focus on continental Europe rather than British or American works. These works give us a chance, then, to broaden our cultural horizons by reading authors whom we might not otherwise encounter, whose works represent the turmoil and political upheaval specific to modern European civilization. Together we will explore these texts, which include short works of fiction as well as drama, in terms of the alienated individual—a state of crisis or anxiety resulting from the collective trauma of modern existence (war, poverty, oppression, etc.) coupled with shaken religious or moral foundations. In such a rapidly changing and highly destructive world, where developments in science and technology call into question traditional belief structures, how does one begin to explain, understand, or justify one’s place or purpose? All of these works will, in their respective ways, grapple with this question. That is not to say, however, that they lack a playful and highly imaginative side; indeed, I think you will find them quirky and intriguing, if not exactly uplifting. Within the general theme of alienation, this course will be divided into three thematic subunits: 1) the absurd, 2) the anti-hero, and 3) women and men.

Catalog Description: Comparative study of representative modern works, read in translation, by authors such as Chekov, Proust, Kafka, Rilke, Dinesen, Duras, and Calvino.

Ryan Hibbett (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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Food, Culture, and Globalization
ENVS 491: YE1, Class # 7484
(Combined with ANTH 491/591 YE1)

Explore the interrelationships among agriculture, political economy, food and culture that underlie the question of food security throughout the world. In 2013, the United Nations predicted that we must increase our arable, food-producing land by 50% by 2050 to be able to feed the world, yet at the same time, arable land is currently declining due to climate change, water shortages, land management policies, urbanization, and civil warfare. This class will examine cultural production of diet, the significance of globalization in putting pressure on local food systems, the problem of food security and potential solutions to the problem. The production, consumption, and distribution of food in relationship to food security will be addressed from an ecological and critical anthropological approach emphasizing food insecurity and hunger as a preventable problem, but one that must be addressed globally now.

<span="font-size: x-small;">Catalog Description: May be repeated to a maximum of 9 semester hours. PRQ: Consent of department.

Kristen Borre (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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Environment & Society
GEOG 253: YE1, Class # 7660

Catalog Description: Introduction to the study of human-environment interactions from a geographic perspective, with emphasis on the role of humans in changing the face of the earth. Fundamentals of environmental science as well as global and local issues related to human population growth, agriculture, water resources, biodiversity, forest resources, energy use, climate change, and environmental health.

Shannon McCarragher (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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Mapping/Fundamentals of Mapping
GEOG 256/556: YE1, Class #s 7489/7490 (8-week 1)
GEOG 256/556: YE2, Class #s 7491/7492 (8-week 2)

This course is an introduction to maps as models of our earth, tools of visualization, and forms of graphic communication. It is also about the processes by which maps are constructed. We will cover the essentials of map construction and map reading. Along the way the student will be introduced to: basic map properties – including scale, datum and projection; the process of map compilation and revision – including satellite remote sensing, GIS and GPS; the presentation of information (data) on maps to effect proper communication; and many of the more common map types the student will encounter in science, literature, business and the media.

Success in this course requires normal, unimpaired vision.

Catalog Description, GEOG 256: Introduction to maps as models of our earth, tools of visualization, and forms of graphic communication. Use of satellite and aerial imagery, land surveying, and geographic informatin systems in map production. Thematic maps and how they are used. Map design for informational and persuasive purposes. Two hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory.
Catalog Description, GEOG 556: For graduate students with little formal background in mapping. Maps as models, tools of visualization, and forms of graphic communication. Processes of map production, including imagery and surveying. Principles of map design.

Andrew Krmenec/Devin Moeller (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online courses, 2 8-week sessions, 01/19 - 03/13 and 03/21 - 05/13.

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Water Resources and the Environment
GEOG 303: YE1, Class # 7493

This course is intended to provide the student with a broader understanding of water and its importance to our lives and earth’s complex environment. We will consider issues facing water such as whether the supply of water will continue, how man-made developments have altered water availability, how pollution has eroded this natural resource, and where/how we can restore our water resources. Relevant video clips, online tutorials, and supplemental readings will be used throughout the course to provide examples of water-related issues affecting northern Illinois, other regions of the U.S., as well as various countries around the world.

Catalog Description: Evaluation of water as a resource; its availability, distribution, use, and quality. Operation of the hydrologic cycle and relationships between surface water and the soil, groundwater, and atmosphere. Human impacts on water resources and the management of water-related hazards, including flooding, drought, and the spread of disease. Lecture and field experience.

Sharon Ashley/Walker Ashley (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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Severe and Hazardous Weather
GEOG 306: YE1, Class # 7494

This course examines the fundamentals of atmospheric phenomena with an emphasis on understanding concepts and processes behind severe manifestations of weather and climate. Physical and dynamical aspects of extratropical cyclones, winter weather phenomena, thunderstorm phenomena, tropical weather systems, and large-scale, longer-term weather events are analyzed. The course is designed so that you will develop an understanding of the important interactions between the evolution of the sciences of climatology and meteorology, technological advances, and the impacts of extreme weather and climate events. Case studies are employed to investigate human, economic, and environmental consequences of extreme weather and climate events. As a student in today’s technologically rich environment, you will be a unique position to apply what you have learned immediately to weather events occurring at home, across the country, or around the world. The course includes analyses of humankind’s impacts on the environment and how these impacts contribute to increased severity and risk of these phenomena. We will examine how tornado and hurricane risk is escalating due to a number of societal factors, including rapid population growth and expansion, together with increases in wealth, development, and urbanization.

Catalog Description: Examination of fundamentals of atmospheric phenomena with an emphasis on understanding concepts and processes behind severe manifestations of weather and climate. Physical aspects of extratropical cyclones, winter weather phenomena, thunderstorm phenomena, tropical weather systems, and large-scale, longer-term weather events are analyzed. Case studies are employed to investigate human, economic, and environmental consequences of extreme weather and climate events.

Walker Ashley (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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Geography of the U.S. and Canada
GEOG 330: YE1, Class # 7495

This course is an introduction to geographic issues in various regions of the United States and Canada. You will be introduced to some major patterns and processes that dominate the major physical and cultural realms of this region. We will first go over some basic physical and social features common to the United States and Canada. We then will explore the historical evolution and unique physical, cultural, and environmental features of fourteen sub-regions, following your textbook. Rather than just describing each region, we will examine the various regions in an attempt to understand and explain regional differences. Ultimately, our exploration of these regions should help us all reach a deeper understanding of the diversity and complexity of life in the United States and Canada. A final project, map quizzes, and exams will all be utilized to increase your knowledge of this diverse and fascinating region.

Catalog Description: Regional analysis of the two countries. Cultural, economic, and political patterns. Geographic perspectives applied to current issues and problems.

Sharon Ashley (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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Introduction to GIS/Fundamentals of GIS
GEOG 359/557: YE1, Class #s 7496/7497 (8-week 1)
GEOG 359/557: YE2, Class #s 7498/7499 (8-week 2)

Have you ever asked yourself, “Where in the world am I?” GEOG 359 may help you answer that question with an introductory study into the principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). In this online course, we develop skills in GIS, its components, and how it applies to our surrounding environment. This course is a primer for those who are interested in learning more about the dynamic and ever-changing world of GIS and its career applications.

Catalog Description, GEOG 359: Study of the fundamental principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Emphasis on the development of these systems, their components and their integration into mainstream geography. Two hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory. PRQ: GEOG 256 or GEOG 352 or consent of department.
Catalog Description, GEOG 557: For graduate students with little formal background in GIS or computer mapping. Principles, components, and uses of geographic information systems. PRQ: GEOG 552 or GEOG 556, or consent of department.

Phil Young (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online courses, 2 8-week sessions, 01/19 - 03/13 and 03/21 - 05/13.

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Climate Change: Science, Impacts & Mitigation
GEOG 368: YE1, Class # 7661

In this course, students will explore the science behind the earth/atmosphere climate system, and learn to apply the science to various challenges facing our society involving human interaction with the climate system. The journey begins with a tour of the earth’s atmosphere, including its composition, sturcture, circulation and energy balance. This portion of the course is also used to teach the proper application of the scientific method to issues pertaining to climate change so that students can properly evaluate claims made outside of the classroom setting in print and media within and beyond the scientific community. After an overview of the climate system, specific topics related to the interactions between human activity and the environment are explored. This includes examing the impacts of a changing atmosphere, ocean and cryosphere on the climate system and society in a holistic sense. Finally, high impact changes in severe weather including tornadoes, hurricanes and snowstorms are investigated. Throughout the semester, it is a primary objective of the course to foster discussion about the benefits and potential challenges involved in a variety of climate change mitigation techniques by identifying how science and philosophy combine to support/question environmental policy.

Catalog Description: Overview of the science of climate change and an analysis of the implications of this change on societies throughout the world. Spatial dimensions of climate change will be examined from a holistic perspective, taking into account interactions between the natural and man-made environment, impacted societies and eth development of economic and social policies. Social and political ramifications of climate change have become apparent as local communities in different parts of the world struggle to adapt to new patterns of urban climate, excessive rainfall, prolonged droughts, and severe weather events.

Isaac Hankes (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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Soils & Environmental Land Use Planning
GEOG 403/503: YE1, Class #s 7500/7501

Application of soil knowledge to land use and management of agricultural, wildland, and urban landscapes. Use of soil survey information in Geographic Information Systems. Emphasis on soil morphology and interpretation, wetlands, hydric soils, soil erosion and conversation, and human and livestock waste disposal.

Catalog Description, GEOG 403: Regional and local problems of soil utilization and mangement. Strategies for using soil data in land use plans and legislation. PRQ: GEOG 101 and GEOG 02, or consent of department.
Catalog Description, GEOG 503: Regional and local problems of soil utilization and mangement. Strategies for using soil data in land use plans and legislation.

Michael Konen (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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The Poetry of Love
ILAS 399: YE1, Class # 8138

We will read a wide selection of poems dealing with love from antiquity to the present and across cultures and traditions in order to expand and enhance our appreciation of this most profound human emotion. We will distinguish between “love poetry” and “the poetry of love” and then examine select poems to see how poetry---in its rhetoric and in its themes---is a unique form of discourse that reveals rather than simply says, or tells, or asserts something about this seemingly ineffable reality of the human condition. As expressed by the poets, love is manifest in all its joy and sorrow, pleasure and pain. From the idealized to the problematic, from the sacred to the profane, from the platonic to the passionate, and from the requited to the unrequited, love inescapably is.

We also will have the opportunity to examine and discuss many magnificent works of art---all revealing love in its multifarious forms---in the color plates reproduced in our book and from the web pages of museums around the world.

Catalog Description: Topics announced. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours when topic varies.

Stephen Franklin (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 03/21 - 05/15.

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Introduction to Law and Courts
POLS 210: YE1, Class # 7666

The institutions and actors that make up our legal system are charged with interpreting and applying neutral principles of law. In one sense then, we expect law and courts to rise above politics. However, in another sense, the law and courts are inherently political. Law is a product of politics and political processes. The judiciary is a co-equal branch of government, judges are selected by political means, and court decisions often have broad political and policy implications. Just how political is our legal system, and conversely, how legal is our political system? Can the two even be separated? In this class, we explore some of the most important aspects of U.S. law and its legal system, as well as legal systems in other countries, in an attempt to answer these and other questions. We will try to separate out popular misconceptions from the realities of how our legal system actually works. In the process, this course will emphasize that law is not simply a subject for lawyers and law professors, but it is also an integral part of our political, policy and economic systems with far reaching effects on society.

Catalog Description: Introduction to the study of law and courts, including legal theory, judicial institutions, legal actors, legal systems and ways in which law is interrelated with politics, public policy and society.

Mitch Pickerill (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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Political Psychology
POLS 301: YE1, Class # 7505

Political psychology as a field is defined largely by its preoccupation with the role of human thought, emotion, and behavior in politics. Political psychology speaks to so many aspects of political phenomena – from American politics, to comparative politics, to international relations. Political psychology is important to understanding how ethnic identities contribute to state conflict as well as how voters react to the particular traits of leaders or campaign rhetoric, for example. Even though the topics we will cover deal mainly with American politics in this course, I encourage you to try to widely apply the concepts we cover to the other areas of politics. We will begin by thinking about thinking – why do we have the political opinions and beliefs that we do? This course has no pre-requisites and all are welcome!

Catalog Description: Examination of the social connections that form the basis of citizen views about politics. Emphasis on group identities, political information processing, cognition, and the role of emotions in American politics. Not available to students who have credit for POLS 407. Recommended: At least sophomore standing or consent of the department.

Rebecca Hannagan (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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Judicial Process
POLS 317: YE1, Class # 7506

The judicial process is filled with myths. These myths are often generated by and reinforced through films, television shows, music, and often fueled popular culture. For example, many see the judicial process as little more than a set of specific procedures, specialized personnel, and institutional arrangements with the goal of adjudicating cases filed in courts. The reality, however, that there are no clear signs to mark the outer edges of the judicial process. Why? Because law is social and political – it is part of our everyday lives. We think that the judicial process ensures just results. Yet, the reality is that the process can and does produce injustices. We will explore why this is as well as many other myths and realities relating to law, law school, the legal profession, attorneys, courts, judges, and other actors involved in the process.

Catalog Description: Organization and operation of trial and appellate courts, selection of judges, varieties of litigation, factors influencing judicial decision-making, and impact of and compliance with judicial decisions. Recommended: At least sophomore standing.

Artemus Ward (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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African-American Political Thought
POLS 355: YE1, Class # 7662

The issue of slavery has echoed through American history and American political thought in a manner unequaled by any other, serving as a crucial springboard for the development of African American political thought. The goal of this course is to gain a deeper understanding of the significant contribution of African Americans to American political thought by focusing on the issue of slavery and its reverberations throughout American history from the Founding up to the present time. Americans’ struggle with slavery—both in abstract and concrete terms—is perhaps the single most obvious way in which the United States is “exceptional” in comparison with other countries. The issue of slavery provides a crucial case study for exploring the ideas of liberty and equality, the two pillars upon which American political thought has been built. This course will explore African American political thought in a manner complemented by readings from the American Founding era and landmark Supreme Court cases dealing with slavery’s implications and legacies.

Catalog Description: Examination and critical analysis of African-American political and social ideas, from the colonial period to the end of the 20th century. Study of the social and political aspects of African-American society through the use of primary materials, speeches, and published articles from African-American political and social leaders. Recommended: At least sophomore standing.

S. Adam Seagrave (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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Women & Politics
POLS 373: YE1, Class # 7663

In this course we will examine the roles of women and men as voters, activists, and politicians – but first and foremost as persons engaged in a political world. Because this is a course in political science, we will begin by examining what “science” entails and how a study of political behavior can be properly scientific. We will then delve into a wide range of relevant issues, including: how gender affects political participation, how boys and girls are socialized differently about politics, how public opinion about various domestic and foreign policies may vary between men and women, and so forth. This is a general class appropriate for all majors. There are no prerequisites and all are welcome!

Catalog Description: Focus on women’s political roles from a variety of cultural perspectives; emphasizes political socialization, access to the policy process, and women as politicians and decision-makers. Recommended: At least sophomore standing.

Rebecca Hannagan (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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Introduction to Brain & Behavior
PSYC 300: YE1, Class # 7507 (8-week 2)

This course explores the biological basis of behavior. The student will first learn about the fundamental elements (neuron and synapse) of the nervous system and their function. The class will build on these basic elements of the nervous system to understand simple (reflexes) and complex (memory) behaviors. The class is structured to follow an online format. Lectures will be captured using blackboard collaborate. Assessments of student learning outcomes will be conducted online via blackboard using several different formats: short answer questions, multiple choice questions, and a culminating project.

Catalog Description: Introductory survey concerned with the relationship between the brain and a wide variety of behaviors, both normal and abnormal. Provides a fundamental understanding of how the brain controls and mediates behavior, and a foundation for more advanced courses in behavioral neuroscience. PRQ: At least sophomore standing and PSYC 102, or consent of department.

Doug Wallace (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 03/21 - 05/13.

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Behavior Disturbances in Children
PSYC 315: YE1, Class # 7508

This course will focus on major forms of atypical development in childhood and adolescence. These include developmental and learning problems (e.g., autism, mental retardation), disorders of behaviors (e.g., ADHD and oppositional disorder), and disorders of emotion (e.g., anxiety and depression). You will learn about the defining characteristics, associated features, possible causes, theoretical formulations, research evidence, and current approaches to intervention and prevention for these disorders. The course will be experiential in nature and involve engaging class discussions relating to present topics concerning childhood psychological disorders.

Catalog Description: Distrubances in children involving intellectual, emotional, and expressive behaviors as well as selected therapeutic procedures and their relationship to psychological theories and research. PRQ: At least sophomore standing and PSYC 102, or consent of department.

Phillip Krasula (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 2 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-Hoffman Estates, Thursdays, 02/04 and 05/05, 6:30 - 9:15 p.m.

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Theories of Personality
PSYC 332: YE1, Class # 7509

This course will examine various renowned theorists who have made major contributions to the field of psychology. The approach for this course will be to offer historical perspectives on personality and to enhance student critical thinking to build a solid framework for understanding “personality.” Class sessions will include lecture; films; discussions and activities.

Catalog Description: Consideration of basic factors in personality and the role of personality in the study of behavior. Discussion and critical examination of contemporary studies in personality, with emphasis on experimental evidence. PRQ: At least sophomore standing and PSYC 102, or consent of department.

Joanne Messina (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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Introduction to Sociology
SOCI 170: YE1, Class # 7664

Sociology is an exciting discipline that analyzes and explains events and experiences within our personal lives, our communities, and across the globe. This course will examine a wide range of topics including families and relationships, government and power, as well as inequalities of race and ethnicity and of gender and social class. We will also discover how one’s culture (and the different groups that we belong to) establishes the framework for how we perceive and experience life. Critical thinking skills are emphasized as a way to move beyond taken-for-granted assumptions of reality and to see the connections between personal experiences and broader social forces. The course will include the use of technoogy (an online textbook equipped with videos, practice quizzes, an anthology of sociological articles and cross-cultural persepctives to go along with traditional textbook content), student-teacher and student-student interaction, as well as self-reflection, to promote greater understanding of the social world in which we and others live.

Catalog Description: Basic survey of major substantive areas within sociology including key contributions to our understanding of the complex social world. Concepts and methods used by sociologists.

Kevin Ervin (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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Social Problems
SOCI 270: YE1, Class # 7510

This course addresses some of the most compelling social problems in society and discusses the diverse contributions sociology has made to the understanding of complex social issues. By investigating topics such as physical & mental health, crime & social control, poverty & economic inequality (just to name a few!), you will be able to identify cause-effect patterns, display a critical understanding of how social problems are shaped by both historical and current societal patterns and use your sociological imagination to critically evaluate strategies for action in alleviating problems facing society today. Using videos, interactive discussions and your own life experiences, you will engage in social learning and explore how YOU are connected to all social phenomena.

Catalog Description: Why social problems occur and how society can work toward correcting them. Exploration of how different value premises and social theories lead to distinctive ways of addressing social problems. Issues such as poverty, crime, homelessness, intergroup conflicts, and sexual identity discrimination provide case materials for these explorations. Use of this approach to examine underlying structural problems such as economic restructuring, the overall health and aging of the population, and urban change and decline.

Kristie Crane (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/19 - 05/13.

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Elementary Statistics
STAT 301: YE1, Class # 7667
STAT 301: YE2, Class # 7668

Introduction to basic concepts in statistical methods including probability, theoretical and empirical distributions, estimation, tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation, and single classification analysis of variance procedures.

Please note: This course is not available for credit toward the major in mathematical sciences. This course may not be used in major GPA calculation for mathematical sciences majors.

Catalog Description: Introduction to basic concepts in statistical methods including probability, theoretical and empirical distributions, estimation, tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation, and single classification analysis of variance procedures. Not available for credit toward the major in mathematical sciences. Not used in major GPA calculation for mathematical sciences majors. PRQ: MATH 206 or MATH 210 or MATH 211 or MATH 229.

Claudine Myers (3 credit hours)

  • Section YE1 meets online with 4 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-Hoffman Estates, Saturdays, 01/23, 02/20, 04/16, and 05/07, 9-11 am.
  • Section YE2 meets online with 4 mandatory face-to-face meetings at Kishwaukee Community College, Mondays, 01/25, 02/22, 04/18, and 05/09, 6-8 pm.

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Introduction to Probability & Statistics
STAT 350: YE1, Class # 7665

Introduction to the basic ideas and fundamental laws of probability including sample spaces, events, independence, random variables, special probability distributions and elementary statistical inference.

Catalog Description: Introduction to the basic ideas and fundamental laws of probability including sampel spaces, events, independence, random variables, special probability distributions and elementary statistical inference. PRQ: MATH 230.

Claudine Myers (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 4 mandatory face-to-face meetings at Kishwaukee Community College, Wednesdays, 01/27, 02/24, 04/20, and 05/11, 6-8 pm.

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A Woman's Place is in the Home?
From Mixing Bowls to Mixing it Up!
WGST 430: YE1, Class # 7511 (Winter Intersession)

From the Cult of True Womanhood to today’s “flirty” and “sassy” aprons, constructions of domesticity have influenced the way our culture constructs “a women’s place.” This class will examine the ways the idea of a feminine domestic space has influenced perceptions of women as well as men from colonial times to today. We will use first-person narratives alongside academic work from a variety of disciplines to consider the subject from a variety of perspectives. Some of the questions we will consider include: how do representations of domesticity differ from lived experiences? How have constructions of domesticity and the domestic space affected participation in economic and political arenas? And how does our current fascination with all things “retro” reflect both progress and backlash?

Catalog Description: Interdisciplinary introduction to selected problems and issues in womens studies. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours as topic changes. PRG: Junior or senior standing or consent of director.

Lise Schlosser (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/01 - 01/29.

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History of Women in Art
WGST 430: YE2, Class # 7900

In this course, students examine the history of women as both creators and subjects of visual art throughout diverse cultures. Consideration is given to how gender is relevant to the definition, creation, and appreciation of art. Through lectures, class discussions, readings, writing assignments, and other activities, students gain an understanding of the diversity of women's artistic expressions throughout history and in different western cultures. In addition, students analyze and articulate the influence that gender, race, sexual orientation, economic class and other aspects of identity have on the creation and reception of women's art forms. Students learn to assess the implication of gender on definitions of art and the writing of art history. This course is 100% online.

Catalog Description: May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours as topic changes. PRQ: Junior or senior standing or consent of director.

Rebekah Kohli (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 03/21 - 05/15.

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