Fall 2015 Courses

Fall 2015

Regular Session
August 24 - December 12, 2015

Off-Campus Courses
&
Online Courses

REGISTRATION | COSTS | LOCATION | OFF-CAMPUS COURSES | ONLINE COURSES

Course Descriptions
ANTH | BIOS | ECON | ENGL | GEOG | HIST | ILAS | POLS | PSYC | SOCI | STAT | WOMS


PLEASE CALL 815-753-5200 for permit course information. Course details may change. For the most up-to-date information, please see our online listings: www.niu.edu/lasbgs.

ATTENTION BGS STUDENTS: You will apply for graduation during the semester in which you register for your final term. You should meet with your adviser to determine that you are registering for the correct courses. You and your adviser must be certain that your file in Registration and Records is complete and accurate with all documents (transcripts, grade changes, substitutions, adviser approval letters) and information necessary for graduation. Please carefully review your Academic Advising Report for accuracy. It is your responsibility to contact your advisor with any questions regarding discrepancies that appear on this report. You may review your Academic Advising Report through MyNIU.

The deadline for applying for December/Fall 2015 graduation is September 1, 2015. You must have at least 90 total semester hours to apply for graduation. The $29.00 graduation fee will be billed to your student account. Absolutely no late applications will be accepted. The deadline for applying for Spring/May 2016 graduation is February 1, 2016.

Registration for Fall 2015 begins the week of April 6, 2015. Registration appointments are assigned based on the number of cumulative hours. Beginning early March, students may check MyNIU for their appointment day and time. Students may register on or after the assigned appointment day and time as long as there are not any holds assigned to their record. All new undergraduate students are allowed to register after meeting with an academic advisor following their orientation session (providing the appointment day and time has been reached).

If you are unfamiliar with the MyNIU system and/or need assistance, please visit
erptraining.niu.edu/erptraining/myniu-sa/studentcenter.shtml.

Courses titled with a computer means that the class is offered online.

ANTH 491

Current Topics in Anthropology:
Native American Culture and the Law
ANTH 491: YE1, Class #9517

This course will discuss key concepts and events in Native American history since the establishment of the United States of America, the changing views of cultural stewardship, museums’ role in artifacts and repatriation, and recent events and case studies. This course will survey cultures of the native peoples of North America and the contemporary issues of various US laws and statutes. This course will be web-based with three face-to-face meetings and will use a combination of online modules and lectures, text readings, videos, activities and ongoing group discussions.

Catalog Description: May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours. PRQ: Consent of department.

Karly Tumminello (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at NIU-Naperville, Wednesdays, 09/02, 10/07, and 12/12, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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BIOS 442/542

Evolution and the Creationist Challenge
BIOS 442/542: YE1, Class #s 9518/9519

The perennial culture wars raging in the USA are expressed in many areas of society. One area of attack is the opposition by the Religious Right to the teaching of evolution in public schools. Since before the famous “Scopes Monkey Trial” in 1925, school boards and legislatures have tried to eliminate, add equal doses of creationism to, or water down the coverage of evolution. They have targeted evolution as a cause for many of their perceived “social evils,” don’t understand science, and cannot separate evolution from “Social Darwinism.”

This course will introduce students to the history of the controversy, define the opposition, and explain where each side gets their ideas and what they believe. We will then explore the philosophy of science in enough detail to be able to separate a scientific question from a non-scientific question. A preliminary survey of primarily biological evolution will provide students with the necessary information to counter creationist arguments. This course is designed to give students the ability to not only defend evolution but, more importantly, attack non-scientific intrusions into the public school system. It is not a course in biological evolution but complementary, and can be taken by any upper-level undergraduate with an interest in science and society.

Catalog Description: Evolutionary theory and tenets of present-day anti-evolutionists with emphasis on providing students with the skills to articulate the theory of evolution as it applies to the biological sciences. Not a substitute for a formal course in evolutionary theory. Recommended for students pursuing careers in secondary science education.

Ron Toth (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 1 face-to-face meeting at NIU-Hoffman Estates, Tuesday, 09/08, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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BIOS 493

Introduction to Botany
BIOS 493: YE1, Class #

This blended online course will survey all of the major groups of land plants but will not cover the algae or fungi, since they are not really plants. We will look at the anatomy, morphology, a bit of physiology, and the evolution of the groups. We will use modern groups in a sequence so that they parallel past evolutionary stages and show how each successive structure or physiological process which evolved gave that particular group a selective advantage over the previous group. Lecture and lab material are integrated into a seamless presentation of PowerPoints with a narration for each image. This course cannot be used for credit toward a major in Biological Sciences.

Catalog Description: Lectures, discussions, and reports on topics of special interest in a particular field of biology. Topics may be selected in one or more fields of biology to a total of 6 semester hours toward any one degree.

Ron Toth (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 1 face-to-face meeting at NIU-Rockford, Wednesday, 09/09, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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ECON 370A

Current Economic Issues:
Health Economics
ECON 370A: YE1, Class #9520

Health has evolved into a multidisciplinary concept; the study of the concept has broadened beyond the realm of physicians, epidemiologists and now includes economists. This course will examine this universal concept from an economist’s perspective, which will include an analysis of the market for health care, the social determinants of health, the role of the government, the role of private sector and an evaluation of the efficiency of public policy.

Catalog Description: Topics of current importance to consumers, resource owners, business, and government. May be repeated up to 9 hours as topics change and can be taken concurrently. PRQ: ECON 260 and ECON 261.

Sowjanya Dharmasankar (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 2 face-to-face meetings at NIU-Naperville, Saturdays, 09/12, 10 - 11 am and 10/31, 10 am - 1 pm.

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ENGL 308

Technical Writing
ENGL 308: YE1, Class #9521

In this fully online class, students will study the principles and strategies for planning, writing, and revising technical documents common in government, business, and industry. Some of the topics covered in this class are audience analysis and purpose, writing effectively, simplifying complex information, writing instructions, and document design.

The class will “meet” in Blackboard Learn where students will find video lectures, video demonstrations, assignment information, discussion boards, and a journal space. Students will also use an online space provided by the textbook publisher to watch video presentations, complete exercises related to the weekly reading assignment, and take quizzes.

The e-textbook Technical Communication, 10th edition (2012), by Mike Markel, is included in the online course space, YourTechCommClass. An access code can be purchased at the University Bookstore and VCB. It can also be purchased online at http://courses.bfwpub.com/yourtechcommclass/student-access.php. Students can also register their access code at this address.

Catalog Description: Principles and strategies for planning, writing, and revising technical documents common in government, business, and industry (e.g., manuals, proposals, procedures, newsletters, brochures, specifications, memoranda, and formal reports). Topics include analysis of audience and purpose, simplifying complex information, document design, and project management.

Jan Knudsen (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/24 - 12/12.

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ENGL 400

Literary Topics: Controversy, Conflict, Consensus:
Great Ideas and the Transformation of Human Consciousness
ENGL 400: YE1, Class #9522

Great ideas are complicated and deserve rigorous study. In this class, we will read a variety of brief yet self-contained excerpts of well-known and longer works by authors from antiquity through the twentieth century. We will focus on the historical context of each work and how the ideas contained therein have informed and transformed western cultural consciousness and remain relevant to our own lives today.

Catalog Description: Topics announced. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours when topic varies.

Stephen Franklin (3 credit hours)

  • Online with three face-to-face meetings at NIU-Naperville, Tuesdays, 09/08, 10/27, and 12/08, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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GEOG 256/556

Maps and Mapping/Fundamentals of Mapping
GEOG 256/556: YE1, Class #s 9523/9524

Though maps have been used by civilizations for well over 5,000 years, practically all aspects of mapping today involve computers – from the collection of real-world data by GPS or satellites to drafting and printing. Rather than study the history of maps and mapping, we will instead study the concept of maps as tools of modern communication and visualization. This course is also the starting point for NIU’s certificate of undergraduate study in Geographic Information Systems (in addition to applying toward the B.G.S.) and is required for several further courses in geography.

Catalog Description, GEOG 256: Introduction to maps as models of our earth, tools of visualization, and forms of graphic communication. Use of satellite and aerial imagery, land surveying, and geographic information systems in map production. Thematic maps and how they are used. Map design for informational and persuasive purposes. Two hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory.
Catalog Description, GEOG 556: For graduate students with little formal background in mapping. Maps as models, tools of visualization, and forms of graphic communication. Processes of map production, including imagery and surveying. Principles of map design.

Devin Moeller/Andrew Krmenec (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/24 - 12/12.

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GEOG 303

Water Resources and the Environment
GEOG 303: YE1, Class #9525

This course is intended to provide the student with a broader understanding of water and its importance to our lives and earth’s complex environment. We will consider issues facing water such as whether the supply of water will continue, how man-made developments have altered water availability, how pollution has eroded this natural resource, and where/how we can restore our water resources. Relevant video clips, online tutorials, and supplemental readings will be used throughout the course to provide examples of water-related issues affecting northern Illinois, other regions of the U.S., as well as various countries around the world.

Catalog Description: Evaluation of water as a resource; its availability, distribution, use, and quality. Operation of the hydrologic cycle and relationships between surface water and the soil, groundwater, and atmosphere. Human impacts on water resources and the management of water-related hazards, including flooding, drought, and the spread of disease. Lecture and field experience.

Sharon Ashley/Walker Ashley (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/24 - 12/12.

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GEOG 306

Severe and Hazardous Weather
GEOG 306: YE1, Class #9526

Examination of fundamentals of atmospheric phenomena with an emphasis on understanding concepts and processes behind severe manifestations of weather and climate. Physical aspects of extratropical cyclones, winter weather phenomena, thunderstorm phenomena, tropical weather systems, and large-scale longer-term weather events are analyzed. Case studies are employed to investigate human, economic, and environmental consequences of extreme weather and climate events.

Catalog Description: Examination of fundamentals of atmospheric phenomena with an emphasis on understanding concepts and processes behind severe manifestations of weather and climate. Physical aspects of extratropical cyclones, winter weather phenomena, thunderstorm phenomena, tropical weather systems, and large-scale, longer-term weather events are analyzed. Case studies are employed to investigate human, economic, and environmental consequences of extreme weather and climate events.

Walker Ashley (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/24 - 12/12.

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GEOG 330

Geography of the U.S. and Canada
GEOG 330: YE1, Class #9527

This course is an introduction to geographic issues in various regions of the United States and Canada. You will be introduced to some major patterns and processes that dominate the major physical and cultural realms of this region. We will first go over some basic physical and social features common to the United States and Canada. We then will explore the historical evolution and unique physical, cultural, and environmental features of fourteen sub-regions, following your textbook. Rather than just describing each region, we will examine the various regions in an attempt to understand and explain regional differences. Ultimately, our exploration of these regions should help us all reach a deeper understanding of the diversity and complexity of life in the United States and Canada. A final project, map quizzes, and exams will all be utilized to increase your knowledge of this diverse and fascinating region.

Catalog Description: Regional analysis of the two countries. Cultural, economic, and political patterns. Geographic perspectives applied to current issues and problems.

Sharon Ashley (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/24 - 12/12.

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GEOG 359/557

Introduction to GIS/Fundamentals of GIS
GEOG 359/557: YE1, Class #s 9528/9530

Have you ever asked yourself, “Where in the world am I?” GEOG 359 may help you answer that question with an introductory study of the principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). In this online course, we develop skills in GIS, its components, and how it applies to our surrounding environment. This course is a primer for those who are interested in learning more about the dynamic and ever-changing world of GIS and its career applications.

Catalog Description, GEOG 359: Study of the fundamental principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Emphasis on the development of these systems, their components and their integration into mainstream geography. Two hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory. PRQ: GEOG 256 or GEOG 352 or consent of department.
Catalog Description, GEOG 557: For graduate students with little formal background in GIS or computer mapping. Principles, components, and uses of geographic information systems. PRQ: GEOG 552 or GEOG 556, or consent of department.

Phil Young (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/24 - 12/12.

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Western Civilization: 1500-1815
HIST 111: CE1, Class #9589

Catalog Description: Examination and interpretation of the major historical changes which took place in Europe between the time of the Renaissance and the Age of the French Revolution.

Sandra Dawson (3 credit hours)

  • NIU-Naperville, Thursdays, 09/10 - 12/10, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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Ancient Greece
HIST 301: DE1, Class #9588

This course will offer a broad, interdisciplinary approach to the history of ancient Greece from the Neolithic through the Hellenistic periods (c.10,000-100 BCE). By its end, you should have a general understanding of the society, key events, and significant material culture of this civilization, as well as the ability to analyze its complex development. This seminar-style course develops several important skills both within and beyond the field of history:

  • The ability to learn, evaluate, and communicate clearly about previously unfamiliar concepts;
  • A greater understanding of a world cultures very different from our own;
  • More sophisticated reading/employment of historical sources, both primary and secondary;
  • The opportunity both to engage with other motivated peers and to teach them about your own research;
  • Practicing intellectual clarity, economy, and depth in both writing and discussion.

Catalog Description: Survey of Ancient Greece including the Bronze Age, Minoan- Mycenean Civilization, Hellenic Civilization and the Classical Age.

Laura Steele (3 credit hours)

  • NIU-Naperville, Mondays, 09/07 - 12/07, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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Women in Modern Europe
HIST 322: DE1, Class #9590

The history of women in modern Europe is a course about the experiences, achievements, and representations of women of all social classes since 1700. Students will be introduced to the ongoing debate about differences between men and women, the conflict between gender and class, as well as different types of feminism through lectures, readings and discussions. Whenever possible, we will look at women’s lives and experiences using a comparative framework. Consequently, Modern Europe is broadly defined to stretch from Great Britain in the west to Russia in the east. Readings will focus on women’s voices at critical historical junctures that include more traditional wars, revolutions and politics of the modern period but we will also look at cultural moments that have defined ideas about women and gender and that have influenced lived experience.

Catalog Description: Critical examination of the experiences, achievements, and representations of women of all classes as well as the gendering of politics and culture since the 18th century. Use of a comparative approach in studying women from Great Britain in the west to Russia in the east whenever possible.

Sandra Dawson (3 credit hours)

  • NIU-Hoffman Estates, Wednesdays, 09/09 - 12/09, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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History of Science to Newton
HIST 323: QE1, Class #9591

Catalog Description: Science in the ancient Near East; Hellenic and Hellenistic science; the Arabs; medieval science; the Copernican revolution; the new physics; and the new biology. PRQ: At least sophomore standing.

James Barnes (3 credit hours)

  • NIU-Rockford, Tuesdays, 09/08 - 12/08, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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Internship
ILAS 390: By Permit Only

Catalog Description: Work as an intern in an off-campus agency in activities related to one of the majors in the college. Reading and paper preparation under the supervision of a faculty member in the college. May be repeated once. S/U grading. PRQ: Consent of major department and college; junior or senior standing.

Judy Santacaterina (3 credit hours)

  • Contact Judy Santacaterina for registration permit at 815-753-7961 or jsantaca@niu.edu.

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POLS 303

State and Local Government
POLS 303: YE1, Class #9531

Are roads in your community of high quality and safe? Does your neighborhood receive adequate police and fire protection? Is the quality of your drinking and bathing water acceptable? Will your children receive a quality education if they attend the public schools in your community? These are just a few issue areas that are affected by decisions made by state and local government. It is common for national and international political proceedings to receive the lion’s share of media attention, but often those government functions that most directly influence your day-to-day life are being carried out by state and local governments. This class will focus on the organizational structures of state and local executives, legislatures, and courts. You will learn the language used to discuss local politics, generally, and the specific pros and cons of alternative local government arrangements.

Catalog Description: Examination of the influence of the mass media and the elite media on American politics with particular emphasis on how the media relates to other systems of power and authority. Recommended: At least sophomore standing.

Scot Schraufnagel (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/24 - 12/12.

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POLS 310

U.S. Supreme Court
POLS 310: YE1, Class #9532

This course will focus on the history, organization, procedures and activities of the United States Supreme Court. Although the Court is at the center of many controversies, most people know relatively little about how it actually operates in the U.S. political and legal systems. The course will examine in depth the nature of Supreme Court appointments, agenda-setting, oral arguments, decision-making, and opinion writing. In addition, we will consider the Court’s relationship to other institutions, including lower courts and the legislative and executive branches. Students will learn how the Court is both a political and legal institution and, more broadly, how law and politics intersect in the U.S. In addition to assigned readings on the Supreme Court, we will follow and discuss (online) current cases before the Court in order to more fully understand how it operates and makes decisions, and the impact its decisions have on law and politics.

Catalog Description: Principles, organization, procedures, and activities of the U.S. Supreme Court. Topics include appointments, public opinion, agenda-setting, oral argument, decision-making, opinion writing, and the Court’s relationship to other institutions including lower courts and the legislative and executive branches. Recommended: At least sophomore standing.

J. Mitch Pickerill (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/24 - 12/12.

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POLS 321

The Origin of Politics
POLS 321: YE1, Class #9702

Catalog Description: Drawing on a version of modern evolutionary theory to frame the approach to studying political behavior, examines the biological bases of political behavior. Intersection of biological and social sciences is tapped for insights and new interpretations of political attitudes and behaviors. Recommended: At least sophomore standing.

Rebecca Hannagan (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/24 - 12/12.

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POLS 395

Contemporary Topics in Political Science
POLS 395: YE1, Class #9703

Catalog Description: Selected topics in the analysis and evaluation of political phenomena in a variety of settings. Topics vary each semester. May be taken a total of three times as topic changes. Enrollment in multiple sections of POLS 395 in a semester is permitted. Recommended: At least sophomore standing.

Rebecca Hannagan (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/24 - 12/12.

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PSYC 372

Social Psychology
PSYC 372: YE1, Class #9533

Alport (1985) writes that social psychology is a scientific study of the way in which people’s thoughts, feelings and behaviors are influenced by the real or imaged presence of other people. This course will examine how people are influenced by immediate surroundings, cultural norms, and family background through lecture, films, activites and small group discussions. Major learning components will offer students enhanced knowledge on critical societal problems such as attitudes, attitude change, conformity, group processes, interpersonal attraction, discrimination/stereotype, pro-social behavior, and health.

Catalog Description: Behavior in the context of social interaction, with emphasis on experimental findings. Includes such topics as interpersonal judgment and perception, social attraction, aggression, prejudice and social influence, including attitude formation and persuasion, conformity, and social modeling. PRQ: At least sophomore standing and PSYC 203, or consent of department.

Joanne Messina (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at NIU-Naperville, Thursdays, 09/10, 10/29, and 12/10, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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SOCI 270

Social Problems
SOCI 270: YE1, Class #9534

This course addresses some of the most compelling social problems in society and discusses the diverse contributions sociology has made to the understanding of complex social issues. By investigating topics such as physical & mental health, crime & social control, poverty & economic inequality (just to name a few!), you will be able to identify cause-effect patterns, display a critical understanding of how social problems are shaped by both historical and current societal patterns and use your sociological imagination to critically evaluate strategies for action in alleviating problems facing society today. Using videos, interactive discussions and your own life experiences, you will engage in social learning and explore how YOU are connected to all social phenomena.

Catalog Description: Why social problems occur and how society can work toward correcting them. Exploration of how different value premises and social theories lead to distinctive ways of addressing social problems. Issues such as poverty, crime, homelessness, intergroup conflicts, and sexual identity discrimination provide case materials for these explorations. Use of this approach to examine underlying structural problems such as economic restructuring, the overall health and aging of the population, and urban change and decline.

Kristie Crane (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 09/07 - 12/12.

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STAT 301

Elementary Statistics
STAT 301: YE1 & YE2, Class #s 9535/9537

Introduction to basic concepts in statistical methods including probability, theoretical and empirical distributions, estimation, tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation, and single classification analysis of variance procedures. This course may not be used in major GPA calculation for mathematical sciences majors.

Please note: This course is not available for credit toward the major in mathematical sciences.

Catalog Description: Introduction to basic concepts in statistical methods including probability, theoretical and empirical distributions, estimation, tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation, and single classification analysis of variance procedures. Not available for credit toward the major in mathematical sciences. Not used in major GPA calculation for mathematical sciences majors. PRQ: MATH 206 or MATH 210 or MATH 211 or MATH 229.

Claudine Myers (3 credit hours)

  • Section YE1 meets online with 4 face-to-face meetings at NIU-Rockford, Mondays, 08/24, 09/28, 11/16, and 12/07, 6:30 - 8:20 pm.
  • Section YE2 meets online with 4 face-to-face meetings at NIU-Hoffman Estates, Saturdays, 08/29, 09/26, 11/14, and 12/05, 9 - 11 am.

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WOMS 430

Special Topics in Women's Studies:
Girls and Video Games
WOMS 430: YE1, Class #9548

Catalog Description: May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours as topics changes. PRQ: Junior or senior standing or consent of director.

Aline Click (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course with online meetings, Tuesdays, 08/24 - 12/12, 6 - 8 pm.

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WOMS 436

Current Debates Seminar:
Gender and the Modern Fairy Tale
WOMS 436: YE1, Class #9547

Fairy tales both reflect and shape cultural norms, values, and gender roles, but each story also holds the potential for subversion. Studying these narratives, we can explore issues of family, gender, race, class, and sexuality. This course will use a multidisciplinary approach and a feminist lens to analyze various fairy tales and explore the narratives in society outside of the fairy tale. How do these narratives show up in popular culture? What can it mean when they do? And how does understanding the underlying fairy tale narrative help us to interpret and shape the way we view the issues of race, class, and gender, and power they address? We will also look at various reinterpretations and rewritings of these tales to explore the ways authors, artists, and filmmakers subvert the original story to create something (not) entirely new.

Catalog Description: May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours as topics changes. PRQ: Junior or senior standing or consent of director.

Lise Schlosser (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/24 - 12/12.

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