Department Personnel

Jie Song

    Jie Song

       jsong@niu.edu

        

Publications, Grants & Presentations




Journal Articles

Drewniak, B., Song, J., Prell, J., Kotamarthi, V. R., and Jacob, R. 2013: Modeling agriculture in the Community Land Model, Geosci. Model Dev., 6, 495-515, doi:10.5194/gmd-6-495-2013.  Web Link

Shao, Haiyan,Jie Songand Hongyun Ma, 2013: “Sensitivity of the East Asian Summer Monsoon Circulation and Precipitation to an Idealized Large-Scale Urban Expansion,” Journal of Meteorological Society of Japan, 91: 163-177.  Web Link

Shao, Haiyan,Jie Songand Hongyun Ma, 2013: “Modeling effect of large-scale urban land use on summer precipitation in East China--The 1994 and 1998 case,”. Journal of Tropical Meteorology, Vol, 29, No. 1, 61-67.

Sun, Shanlei, Haishan Chen, Weimin Ju,Jie Song,Jie Sun, Yujie Fang, 2012: “Effects of climate change on annual streamflow using climate elasticity in Poyang Lake Basin, China,”. Theoretical and Applied Climatology, DOI 10.1007/s00704-12-0714-y Web Link

Sun, Shanlei, Haishan Chen, Weimin Ju, Jie Song,Jinjian Li, Yongjian Ren, Ji Sun, 2012: “Past and future changes of streamflow in Poyang Lake Basin, Southeastern China. ”. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 16, 2006-2020. Web Link

Zhihong Jiang, Jie Song,Laurent Li, Weilin Chen, Ji Wang, Zhifu Wang, 2012: “Extreme climate events in China: IPCC-AR4 model evaluation and projection”. Climatic Change, vol. 110, No.1-2, 385-401.

SUN Shanlei, ZHOU Suo quan, SONG Jie, SHI Jianhong, GU Renying5, and HUANG Jue, 2011, Discussion on the Variation Characteristics of the Total Solar Radiation in Jiangxi Province Utilizing Penman Equation. Climatic and Environmental Research (published in Chinese Journal, refereed), 16 (5): 630-640

Shanlei Sun, Suoquan Zhou, Jie Song, Jianhong Shi, Renying Gu, Fengmin Ma, 2010, Change in pan evaporation and its driving factors in Jiangxi Province, Transactions of the Chinese Society of Agricultural Engineering. 26 (9): 59-65. Web Link

Renying Gu, Suoquan Zhou, Jie Song, Shanlei Sun, Jianhong Shi, Yang Luo, 2010: Variation analysis on Pan Evaporation and Its influence factors in Jangxi Province for the last 46 years. Chinese Journal of Agrometeorology. 31(3): 388-394. Web Link

Xuesong Zhang, Shuanghe Shen, Jie Song, Xiaodong Zhou, Yongxiu Li, 2010: Diurnal variation of the vertically distributed sunlit and shaded leaves and contribution to photosynthesis in the cotton field, Journal of Nanjing Institute of Meteorology, 33(2): 180-185 Web Link

Ma, Hongyun, Guo, Pinwen, and Song, Jie,  2009: “Simulation of ‘2007.7’ heavy rainfall case in the Changjiang-Huaihe valley using the WRF model with different land surface schemes”, Chinese Journal of Atmospheric Sciences (in Chinese), 33(3): 557-567. Web Link

Zhang, Xuesong, Shen, Shuanghe, Song, Jie, 2009: “ The vertical distribution of cotton leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic characteristics in the north China plain”. Acta Ecologica Sinica [Chinese Journal of Eco-Agriculture], 29(4): 1893-1898. Web Link

Jiang, Zhihong, Chen, Welin, Song, Jie, Wang, Ji, 2009: “Projection and Evaluation of the Annual Precipitation Extremes Indices over China using Seven IPCC AR4 AOGCMs,” Chinese Journal of Atmospheric Sciences, 33(1): 109-120.  Web Link

Wang, Ji, Jiang, Zhihong, Song, Jie, Ding, Yu Guo, 2008,“Evaluating the Simulation Ability of the IPCC-AR4 GCMS on the Extreme Temperature Indices in China,” Acta Geographica Sinica (Chinese Journal of Geophysics), 63(3): 227-236. Web Link

Song, J., Wesely, M.L., Holdridge, D.J., and Cook, D.R., 2006: Estimating the Long-term Hydrological Budget over Heterogeneous Surfaces. Journal of Hydrometeorology , Vol. 7, No. 1, 203–214. Abstract

Shankman, D., Keim, B. and Song, J., 2006: Flood frequency in China 's Poyan lake region: trends and teleconnections. International Journal of Climatology , 26: 1255-1266. Abstract 

Song, J., Liao, K., Coulter, R.L., and Lesht B.M., 2005: Climatology of the low-level jet at the southern Great Plains Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments site. Journal of Applied Meteorology, Vol. 44, No. 10, 1593–1606. Abstract 

Miller, N.L., A. W. King, M. A. Miller, E. P. Springer, M. L. Wesely, K. E. Bashford and M. E. Conrad, K. Costigan, P. N. Foster, H. K. Gibbs, J. Jin, J. Klazura and B. M. Lesht, M. V. Machavaram, F. Pan, J. Song , D. Troyan, R. A. Washington-Allen, 2005: The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society , 86 , 359-374.

Grossman, R., Yates, D., LeMone, M., Wesely, M.L., and Song, J., 2005: Observed effects of horizontal surface temperature variations on the atmosphere over a Mid-west watershed during CASES 97. Journal of Geophysica l Research 110, No.6, D06117, doi:10.1029/2004JD004542

Lu, D. and J. Song, 2004, “A simplified atmospheric correction procedure for estimating surface temperature from AVHRR thermal data”, GIScience & Remote Sensing, 41:81-94 

Song, J. 2003, "Radiation Measurements." book Chapter for "Phenology: An Integrative Environmental Science", edited by Mark D. Schwartz, October 2003, 592 pp. Book Series: TASKS FOR VEGETATION SCIENCE : Volume 39, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht.  

Song, J. and M.L. Wesely, 2003, "On comparison of modeled surface flux variations to aircraft observations". Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 117:159-171. Abstract 

Song, J., D. Lu, M.L. Wesely, 2003, "On simplified atmospheric correction procedures for shortwave bands of satellite images", Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing 69, no. 5: 521-529. Abstract 

M.L. Wesely, J. Song, R.T. McMillen, and T.P. Meyers, 2001, "Effects of soil moisture variation on deposition velocities above vegetation." Water, Air and Soil Pollution: Focus, 1, No. 5-6, 5-15. Abstract 

Song J., M.L. Wesely, R.L. Coulter, and E.A. Brandes, 2000, "Estimating watershed evapotranspiration with PASS. Part I: inferring root-zone moisture conditions using satellite data." Journal of Hydrometeorology, 1: 447-461. Abstract

Song J., M.L. Wesely, M.A. LeMone, and R.L. Grossman, 2000, "Estimating watershed evapotranspiration with PASS. Part II: moisture budgets during drydown periods." Journal of Hydrometeorology, 1: 462-473. Abstract

Song, J., 2000, "Changes in Dryness/wetness in China during the last 529 years." International Journal of Climatology, 20: 1003-1015. Abstract  

Song, J. and W. Gao, 1999, "An Improved Method to Derive Surface Albedo from Narrowband AVHRR Satellite Data: Narrowband to Broadband Conversion," Journal of Applied Meteorology, 38, 239-249.  

Song, J., 1999, "Phenological Influences on the Albedo of Prairie Grassland and Crop Fields." International Journal of Biometeorology, 42, 153-157.

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Grants, Feloowships and Leaves of Absence

Sabbatical Leave, Fall 2010

Contract grant: “ Research on climate effect of east coast urbanization in China and strategy”, National Basic Research Program of China (2010CB428500), 2010-2014.

Co-PI for the proposal “Carbon Dioxide and Methane Exchange in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems” NASA Terrestrial Ecology Program, 2009-2013, not funded.

PI, “Investigating the impact of urbanization in Yangtze River Delta to atmospheric circulation and precipitation”, funded by the Foundation of Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster, 9/2007- 9/2009.

Co-PI for “Influence of Canopy Stomata Resistance to Water Cycle under Different Climate Background.” funded by the Chinese National Science Foundation, 1/2008-12/2010.

The Graduate School Fund for Summer Faculty Research and Artistry, 2009.

 PI, the U.S. Department of Energy, Climate Change Prediction Program 2004-2007, “The Role of Soil and Vegetation in the Future Climate.” Summary

PI for "Long-term surface hydrological study at Walnut River Watershed," (Project/Grant G5A 63670) funded by the Department of Energy through Argonne National Laboratory, duration is 05/15/2001 -05/15/2004. Summary
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Journal Articles

Song, J., Wesely, M.L., Holdridge, D.J., and Cook, D.R., 2006: Estimating the Long-term Hydrological Budget over Heterogeneous Surfaces. Journal of Hydrometeorology , Vol. 7, No. 1, 203–214.

Abstract: Estimates of the hydrological budget in the Walnut River Watershed (WRW; %7e5,000 km 2 ) of southern Kansas were made with a parameterized subgrid-scale surface (PASS) model for the period 1996–2002. With its subgrid-scale distribution scheme, the PASS model couples surface meteorological observations with satellite remote sensing data to update root-zone available moisture and to simulate surface evapotranspiration rates at high resolution over extended areas. The PASS model is observationally driven, making use of extensive parameterizations of surface properties and processes. Heterogeneities in surface conditions are spatially resolved to an extent determined primarily by the satellite data pixel size. The purpose of modeling the spatial and interannual variability of water budget components at the regional scale is to evaluate the PASS model's ability to bridge a large grid cell of a climate model with its subgrid-scale variation. Modeled results indicate that annual total evapotranspiration at the WRW is about 66–88% of annual precipitation — reasonable values for southeastern Kansas — and that it varies spatially and temporally. Seasonal distribution of precipitation plays an important role in evapotranspiration estimates. Comparison of modeled runoff with stream gauge measurements demonstrated close agreement and verified the accuracy of modeled evapotranspiration at the regional scale. In situ measurements of energy fluxes compare favorably with the modeled values for corresponding grid cells, and measured surface soil moisture corresponds with modeled root-zone available moisture in terms of temporal variability despite very heterogeneous surface conditions. With its ability to couple remote sensing data with surface meteorology data and its computational efficiency, PASS is easily used for modeling surface hydrological components over an extended region and in real time. Thus, it can fill a gap in evaluations of climate model output using limited field observations.
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Shankman, D., Keim, B. and Song, J., 2006: Flood frequency in China 's Poyan lake region: trends and teleconnections. International Journal of Climatology , 26: 1255-1266.  

Abstract:  Poyang Lake in Jiangxi Province is the largest freshwater lake in China and is historically a region of significant floods. Annual peak lake stage and the number of severe flood events have increased dramatically during the past few decades. This trend is related primarily to levee construction at the periphery of the lake that protects a large rural population. These levees reduce the area formerly available for floodwater storage resulting in higher lake stages during the summer flood season and catastrophic levee failures. Poyang Lake's most severe floods since 1950, and ranked from highest to lowest, occurred in 1998, 1995, 1954, 1983, 1992, 1973, and 1977. All of these floods occurred during or immediately following El Nino events, which are directly linked to rainfall in central China . The 2-year recurrence interval for maximum annual lake stage during El Nino years is 1.2 m higher than during non-El-Nino years. The 10-year recurrence interval is 1.4 m higher during El Nino years than during non El Nino years.

(Key Words: China , climate variability, flooding, El Nino-Southern Oscillation, Poyang Lake .)
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Song, J., Liao, K., Coulter, R.L., and Lesht B.M., 2005: Climatology of the low-level jet at the southern Great Plains Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments site. Journal of Applied Meteorology, Vol. 44, No. 10, 1593–1606.  

Abstract:  We have used a unique data set obtained with combinations of minisodars and 915-MHz wind profilers at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility in Kansas to examine the detailed characteristics of the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ). In contrast to instruments used in earlier studies, the ABLE instruments provide hourly, high-resolution vertical profiles of wind velocity from just above the surface to approximately 2 km above ground level (AGL). Furthermore, the 6-yr span of the data set allowed us to examine interannual variability in jet properties with improved statistical reliability. We found that LLJs occurred during 63% of the nighttime periods sampled. Although most of the observed jets were southerly, a substantial fraction (28%) was northerly. Wind maxima occurred most frequently at 200–400 m AGL, though some jets were found as low as 50 m, and the strongest jets tended to occur above 300 m. Comparison of LLJ heights at three locations within the ABLE domain and at one location outside the domain suggests that the jet is equipotential rather than terrain following. The occurrence of southerly LLJ varied annually in a way that suggests a connection between the tendency for jet formation and the large-scale circulation patterns associated with El Niño and La Niña, as well as with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. However, frequent and strong southerly jets that transport moisture downstream do not necessarily lead to more precipitation locally.
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Song, J. and M.L. Wesely, 2003, "On comparison of modeled surface flux variations to aircraft observations". Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 117:159-171. 

Abstract: Evaluation of models of air-surface exchange is facilitated by an accurate match of areas simulated with those seen by micrometeorological flux measurements. Here, spatial variations in fluxes estimated with the parameterized subgrid-scale surface (PASS) flux model were compared to flux variations seen aboard aircraft above the Walnut River Watershed in Kansas. Despite interference by atmospheric eddies, the areas where the modeled sensible and latent heat fluxes were most highly correlated with the aircraft flux estimates were upwind of the flight segments. To assess whether applying a footprint function to the surface values would improve the model evaluation, a two-dimensional correlation distribution was used to identify the locations and relative importance of contributing modeled surface pixels upwind of each segment of the flight path. The agreement between modeled surface fluxes and aircraft measurements was improved when upwind fluxes were weighted with an optimized footprint parameter f, which can be estimated from wind profiler data and surface eddy covariance. Variations of the flight-observed flux were consistently greater than those modeled at the surface, perhaps because of the smoothing effect of using 1-km pixels in the model. In addition, limited flight legs prevented sufficient filtering of the effects of atmospheric convection, possibly accounting for some of the more prominent changes in fluxes measured along the flight paths.  

Keywords: Footprint; Eddy covariance; Aircraft, Land surface model; Latent heat flux; Sensible heat flux
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Song, J., D. Lu, M.L. Wesely, 2003, "On simplified atmospheric correction procedures for shortwave bands of satellite images", Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing 69, no. 5: 521-529. 

Abstract: Accurate corrections of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) for atmospheric effects are currently based on modeling the physical behavior of radiation as it passes through the atmosphere. An important requirement for application of the physical models is detailed information on atmospheric humidity and particles. Here, a method is described for making atmospheric corrections without the need for detailed atmospheric observations. A simplified approach for making atmospheric corrections to reflectances observed from satellites is developed by using the unique spectral signature of water pixels in satellite images. A radiative transfer model is applied to a variety of clear-sky conditions to generate functional relationships between the radiation due to the atmospheric scattering above water bodies and atmospheric radiative properties. Test cases indicate that the resulting estimates of surface reflectances and NDVI agree well with estimates made using a radiative transfer model applied independently and with measurements made at the surface.
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M.L. Wesely, J. Song, R.T. McMillen, and T.P. Meyers, 2001, "Effects of soil moisture variation on deposition velocities above vegetation." Water, Air and Soil Pollution: Focus, 1, No. 5-6, 5-15.  

Abstract: The parameterized subgrid-scale surface flux (PASS) model provides a simplified means of using remote sensing data from satellites and limited surface meteorological information to estimate the influence of soil moisture on bulk canopy stomatal resistance to the uptake of gases over extended areas. PASS-generated estimates of bulk canopy stomatal resistance were used in a dry deposition module to compute gas deposition velocities with a horizontal resolution of 200m for approximately 5000 km2 of agricultural crops and rangeland. Results were compared with measurements of O3 flux and concentrations made during April and May 1997 at two surface stations and from an aircraft. The trend in simulated O3 deposition velocity during soil moisture drydown over a period of a few days matched the trend observed at the two surface stations. For areas under the aircraft flight paths, the variability in simulated O3 deposition velocity was substantially smaller than the observed variability, while the averages over tens of kilometers were usually in agreement within 0.1 cm/s. Model results indicated that soil moisture can have a major role in deposition of O3 and other substances strongly affected by canopy stomatal resistance. Keywords: Dry deposition, latent heat flux, ozone, satellite observation, stomatal resistance.
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Song J., M.L. Wesely, R.L. Coulter, and E.A. Brandes, 2000, "Estimating watershed evapotranspiration with PASS. Part I: inferring root-zone moisture conditions using satellite data." Journal of Hydrometeorology, 1: 447-461.  

Abstract: A model framework for parameterized subgrid-scale surface fluxes (PASS) has been modified and applied as PASS1 to use satellite data, models, and limited surface observations to infer root-zone available moisture (RAM) content with high spatial resolution over large terrestrial areas. Data collected during the 1997 Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study field campaign at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments site in the Walnut River watershed in Kansas were used to evaluate applications of the PASS1 approach to infer soil moisture content at times of satellite overpasses during cloudless conditions. Data from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers on the NOAA-14 satellite were collected and then adjusted for atmospheric effects by using LOWTRAN7 and local atmospheric profile data from radiosondes. The input variables for PASS1 consisted of normalized difference vegetation index and surface radiant temperature, together with representative observations of downwelling solar irradiance, air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed. Surface parameters, including roughness length, albedo, surface conductance for water vapor, and the ratio of soil heat flux to net radiation, were estimated with parameterization suitable for the area using satellite data and land-use information; pixel-specific near-surface meteorological conditions such as air temperature, vapor pressure, and wind speed were adjusted according to local surface forcing; and RAM content was estimated using surface energy balance and aerodynamic methods. Comparisons with radar cumulative precipitation observations and in situ soil moisture estimates indicated that the spatial and temporal variations of RAM a the times of satellite overpasses were simulated reasonably well by PASS1.
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Song J., M.L. Wesely, M.A. LeMone, and R.L. Grossman, 2000, "Estimating watershed evapotranspiration with PASS. Part II: moisture budgets during drydown periods." Journal of Hydrometeorology, 1: 462-473.  

Abstract: The second part of the parameterization of subgrid-scale surface fluxes model (PASS2) has been developed to estimate long-term evapotranspiration rates over extended areas at a high spatial resolution by using satellite remote sensing data and limited, but continuous, surface meteorological measurements. Other required inputs include data on initial root-zone available moisture (RAM) content computed by PASS1 for each pixel at the time of clear-sky satellite overpasses, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from the overpasses, and databases on available water capacity and land-use classes. Site-specific PASS2 parameterization's evaluate surface albedo, roughness length, and ground heat flux for each pixel, and special functions distributed areally representative observations of wind speed, temperature, and water vapor pressure to individual pixels. The surface temperature for each pixel and each time increment is computed with an approximation involving the surface energy budget, and the evapotranspiration rates are computed via a bulk aerodynamic formulation. Results from PASS2 were compared with observations made during the 1997 Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study field campaign in Kansas. The modeled diurnal variation of RAM content, latent heat flux, and daily evapotranspiration rate were realistic in comparison to measurements at eight surface sites. With the limited resolution of the NDVI data, however, model results deviated from the observations at locations where the measurement sites were in fields with surface vegetative conditions notably different than surrounding fields. Comparisons with aircraft-based flux measurements suggested that the evapotranspiration rates over distances of tens of kilometers were modeled without significant bias.
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Song, J., 2000, "Changes in Dryness/wetness in China during the last 529 years." International Journal of Climatology, 20: 1003-1015.  

Abstract: Historically written records of weather conditions that affect agriculture and living conditions in China can serve as a proxy for instrumental observations of the relative wetness and dryness, or precipitation amounts, for periods of time dating back to at least AD 1470. The dryness/wetness index (DW) data at 100 selected sites and at a subset of 25 sites with entirely continuous data indicate that during the growing season the number of sites with dryness increased rapidly in the 20th century, in contrast to a gradual increase and leveling off of wetness since the 18th century. Dry conditions existed mostly in northeastern China in the 16th and 17th centuries. In the 20th century, dryness prevailed in most areas in China, and the chance of occurrence at each site increased. Wet conditions have expanded from east coastal areas to inland since the 19th century. As a result of increased dryness and wetness, the number of sites experiencing normal precipitation conditions has dropped dramatically. The number of sites with extreme dryness/wetness has also increased during the 20th century, and the spatial distribution of the sites with a large chance of extreme dryness/wetness has also changed. The frequent occurrences in dryness/wetness as well as in extremes in the 20th century seem indicative of an abnormality in climate on a large scale. Spectral analysis of the DW data has revealed that cycles in dryness/wetness and their extremes have existed with periods on relatively short time scales as well as on the long time scales. The possible existence of a century-scale cycle suggests that caution should be used in relating variations in rainfall conditions to global warming. Keyword: historical data, dryness/wetness, extreme events, climate change, China.
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Grants 

PI, the U.S. Department of Energy, Climate Change Prediction Program 2004-2007, “The Role of Soil and Vegetation in the Future Climate.”

The objective of the project is to develop a dynamic rooting (DR) module that links ground hydrology to ecosystems and carbon cycle in climate model with variant rooting distribution and function in response to climate, and to examine the influence of realistic representation of plant roots on simulated changes in future climate and atmospheric CO 2 . First, a DR module is developed to be plant functional types (PFTs) specific for coupling with one of the comprehensive land surface models; second, the new land surface model with DR is implemented for offline global-scale simulations and optimization of module parameters, and finally, the role of dynamic rooting system in modeling future climate under IPCC scenarios is investigated by performing atmosphere-ocean-land modeling. In addition, the influence of changes in global water cycle and carbon balance on major biomes will be evaluated for distinct climate zones. The research results will help to reduce the uncertainties in the predicted hydrological cycle and carbon budget for the future global change, and will bridge the gap between ecosystem researches with climate modeling.
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PI for "Long-term surface hydrological study at Walnut River Watershed," (Project/Grant G5A 63670) funded by the Department of Energy through Argonne National Laboratory, duration is 05/15/2001 -05/15/2004.  

A three-year pilot study on the terrestrial water cycle began in March for DOE as a collaborative effort involving several national laboratories. The study focuses on development and demonstration of techniques to observe and model the components of the hydrological cycle such as evapotranspiration, precipitation, runoff, storage as ground water, and changes in soil moisture content. The chosen area of study is the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), a closed catchment already partially instrumented by Argonne National Laboratory and DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. The WRW has an area of approximately 5000 km2 and is located just east of Wichita, Kansas. Activities at Northern Illinois University's Department of Geography, under the direction of Dr. Song, will focus on application of the PASS model to the WRW and, in greatest detail, to the Whitewater subbasin. Estimates of evaporation and root-zone soil moisture will be made for multiple seasons and at higher spatial resolution than previously accomplished by PASS. Benchmarking the results by comparison to field measurements will be routinely carried out. A multiyear evaluation of all o the hydrological components will be made. The work at Northern Illinois University will provide scientific support to other water cycle participants on use of PASS as a land surface model that can be coupled with mesoscale meteorological models and to couple PASS with belowground hydrological models. Also data sets produced by PASS on soil moisture and evaporation amounts will be made available to water cycle participants.
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Presentations, Professional Meetings, Invited Lectures


Professional Meetings

Jie Song: “Modeling the vegetation root distribution for a changed precipitation” April 14-18, 2010 Annual Meeting of Association of American Geographers, Washington, DC.

Jie Song: “Modeling East Asia Climate under Large-scale Urban Land Use Change during Summer Monsoon”, The 2nd International Workshop on Energy and Water Cycle over the Tibetan Plateau and High-elevations” 19-21 July, Lhasa, Tibet, China.

Jie Song, Joshua Hatzis: “Modeling the Influence of Vegetation Root Distribution for a Changed Climate”, 2010 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, Dec. 13-17, San Francisco CA.

Drewniak, B A.,
Prell, J., Kotamarthi, VR.,
Song, J Estimating Changes in Soil Organic Carbon Under Selected Agriculture Residue and Fertilizer Management Practices with the Community Land Model2010 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, Dec. 13-17, San Francisco CA.

Song, J., “Modeling carbon and water budgets in current and future agricultural land use”, Paper presentation at AAG annual meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, March 22-27, 2009

Drewniak, B. A., Song, J., Prell, J., Kotamarthi, R., Jacob, R. “Modeling Soil Organic Carbon for Agricultural Land Use Under Various Management Practices”, poster presentation at the 2009 America Geophysical Union annual conference, 14-18 December, San Francisco, CA.

Suoquan Zhou, Jie Song, Shanlie Sun, Renying Gu, Jianhong Shi, “Investigating Long-term Variations in Solar Irradiance in the Jiangxi Province”, China, International Conference on Land Surface Radiation and Energy Budget, March 18-20, 2009, Beijing, China.

Jie Song, Zhihong Jiang and Hongyun Ma: Effect of Urban Land Cover and Pollution in a Heat Wave Event in Nanjing, China.  Fourth Japan-China-Korea Joint Conference on Meteorology, 26-28 May 2009, Tsukuba, Japan

Song, J. “Modeling the Vegetation Root System for Water and Carbon Fluxes” Paper presentation at AAG annual meeting, Boston, Massachusetts, April 14-18, 2008

Song, J. et al. “Exploring future research gaps: Water resources, climate change, and world regions” – Panelist, Panel presentation at AAG annual meeting, Boston, Massachusetts, April 14-18, 2008

Song, J., “Modeling the Vegetation Root System for Water and Carbon Fluxes” poster presentation at the 13th Annual Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Workshop, in Breckenridge, Colorado, June 16-19, 2008

Drewniak, B., Song,J., Prell,J., Kotamarthi, R., Jacob, R., and Foster I., “Implementation and Evaluation of a Crop Model in the Community Land Model” poster presentation at the 13th Annual Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Workshop, in Breckenridge, Colorado, June 16-19, 2008

Drewniak, B., Kotamarthi, R., Jacob, R., Prell, J., Song, J., and Foster, I., “Modeling water and carbon budgets in current and future agricultural land use”
Poster Presentation at American Geophysical Union, San Francesco, December 15-19, 2008.

Hatzis, J. and Song, J. “Evaluating Root Distributions in Land Surface Modeling”  West Lake AAG meeting, Indiana University, Nov. 13-15, 2008
 
Song, J. and Song, G., “Vegetation and Root Dynamics for the Land Surface Modeling,” Association of American Geographers (AAG) Annual Meeting, April 17-21, 2007, San Francisco, California.

Song, G. and Song, J., “Simulations of dynamic vegetation over grasslands and croplands,” Association of American Geographers (AAG) Annual Meeting, April 17-21, 2007, San Francisco, California.

Song J., “Surface hydrology modeling by using remote sensing and meteorological observations,” Annual Meeting hold by Jinagsu Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster, June 1-2, 2007, Nanjing, China

Song, J., “Modeling the multi-year surface hydrology at the Walnut River Watershed,” International Workshop on Semi-Arid Land Surface-Atmosphere Interaction, August 9-11, 2007, Lanzhou, China

Song, J. “Modeling the Vegetation Root System for Water and Carbon Fluxes” at Climate Change Prediction Program (CCPP) Meeting, September 17-19, 2007, Indiana, USA

Song, J. and Song, G., Root dynamics module for land surface modeling. Association of American Geographers, Joint Annual Meeting of the Great Plains-Rocky Mountain Division and the West Lakes Division, October 5-7, 2006, Lincoln, Nebraska.

Song, G. and Song, J., Integrating vegetation dynamics into a land surface model. Association of American Geographers, Joint Annual Meeting of the Great Plains-Rocky Mountain Division and the West Lakes Division, October 5-7, 2006, Lincoln, Nebraska.

Song, J. “Multi-year Simulation of Surface Hydrological Components by Coupling Remote Sensing Data with Surface Observation” for 85th AMS Annual Meeting being held 9-13 January, 2005 in San Diego, CA. 

Shankman, D., Keim, B., and Song, J.  Flood control in China's Poyang Lake region: trends and teleconnections.  International Conference on Poyang Lake Complex Environment System. Nanchang, China. June 28, 2005.

Song, J., Richard L. Coulter and Barry M. Lesht, “Climatology of the Low-Level Jet at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments Site.” Poster presentation at Argonne National Laboratory Applied Science and Technology Conference, April 14, 2005.

Song, J. “Multi-year Simulation of Surface Hydrological Components by Coupling Remote Sensing Data with Surface Observation.” Poster presentation at Argonne National Laboratory Applied Science and Technology Conference, April 14, 2005.

Song, J. “Climate simulation with a new multi-layer soil scheme in ECHAM5”, June 28-30, 2004, The International Chinese Ocean-Atmosphere Conference, at Beijing, China

Song, J., “The role of soil and vegetation in the future climate”, Climate Change Prediction Program Meeting, Seattle, Washington, Oct. 18-20, 2004.

Song, J. and M.L. Wesely, 2003: “Modeling Multi-year Evapotrasnpiration with Remote Sensing Data,” presented at The Association of American Geographers 99th Annual Meeting, March 5-8, New Orleans, LA.

Liao, K. and J. Song, 2003: “Climatological Study of the Nocturnal Low-level Jet in the Southern Great Plains,” presented at the East Lakes and West Lakes Division Joint Meeting of the Association of American Geographers, Western Michigan University, October 17-18, Kalamazoo, MI.

Song, J. and Wesely, L.M., “On evaluation of modeled surface fluxes with aircraft observations”, AAG West Lakes Division Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, October 17-19, 2002.
Song, J., D. Lu, M.L. Wesely, “Simplified atmospheric correction procedures for shortwave bands of satellite images, Geoinformatics 2002, Nanjing, P.R.China, June 1-3, 2002.

Song, J., and Wesely. L.M. “Estimating Long-term Surface Hydrological Components by coupling the remote sensing observation with Surface Flux Model”, Geoinformatics 2002, Nanjing, P.R.China, June 1-3, 2002

Song, J., and Wesely. L.M. “Estimating surface hydrological components using the parameterized subgrid-scale flux model”, European Geophysical Society XXXVI General Assembly, Nice, France, March 25-30, 2001

Song, J., and Wesely, L.M. “Estimating surface hydrological components by using the parameterized subgrid-scale flux model”, West Lakes AAG, at Joliet Junior College Oct. 11-13, 2001

Finley, J., Song, J. and Coulter, R. “Investigating spatial and temporal characteristics of the nocturnal low-level jet using radar wind profiler”, West Lakes AAG, at Joliet Junior College Oct. 11-13, 2001

Song, J. “Modeling atmosphere and land surface exchange with remote sensing”, November meeting of the Chicago Chapter of the American Meteorological Society, DeKalb, IL, Nov. 6, 2001

Song, J. and Wesely, M.L.: “Estimating Root-Zone Moisture and  Evapotranspiration with AVHRR Data”. Preprint in The 15th Conference on Hydrology, (pp. 293-6), American Meteorological Society, Long Beach, California, January 9-14, 2000.

Song, J. and Wesely, M.L.: “Soil Moisture and Evapotranspiration Estimation using Satellite Data”. Presentation at the 96th Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, April 4-8, 2000.

Song, J. and Wesely, M.L.: “Long-term surface hydrology studies at the Walnut River Watershed”. Presentation at the 2000 Fall American Geophysical Union Meeting, San Francisco, California, Dec. 15-19, 2000.

Song, J. and Wesely, M.L.: “Using Remote Sensing Data to Infer Root-Zone Moisture and Evapotranspiration.” West Lakes meeting of the Association of American Geographers, DeKalb, IL, September-October 1999.

Song, J. and Lu, D.: “Exploring a Scheme for Routine Atmospheric Corrections of Satellite Reflectances.”  West Lakes meeting of the Association of American Geographers, DeKalb, IL, September-October 1999 (with D. Lu).

Song, J.: “Exploring the Effect of Irrigation on Regional Climate.”  Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers, Honolulu, March 1999.

Song, J.: “Inference of Extractable Soil Moisture in the Plant Root Zone at the Walnut River Watershed.” The 13th Symposium on Boundary Layer Turbulence: 539-541, American Meteorological Society, Dallas, Texas, January 1999 (with  Wesely, M.L., Coulter, R.L., Lesht,B.M., Oncley, S.P., Cuenca, R.H., and Brandes, E.A.).

“Diurnal Evapotranspiration Estimates in the Walnut River Watershed.” The 14th Conference on Hydrology: 102-105, American Meteorological Society, Dallas, Texas, January 1999 (with Wesely, M.L., Coulter, R.L., Lesht,B.M., Oncley, S.P., Cuenca, R.H., and Brandes, E.A.).

“Detection of Climate Change in the Proxy Records of Dryness/wetness in China.” 2nd International Conference on Atmospheric and Environmental Science, Beijing, China, August 1998.

“An Improved Method to Derive Surface Albedo from AVHRR Narrowband Satellite Data.” 90th Annual Meeting, Illinois State Academy of Science, Chicago, IL, April 1998.

“Seasonal Variation of Albedo in Prairie Grassland and Crop Fields." The Association of American Geographers 94th Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, March 1998.

“Sign of Global Warming in China---Examining the Dryness/Wetness Index.” The Association of American Geographers 93rd Annual Meeting, Fort Worth, TX, April 1997.

“An Improved Biophysical Parameterization of Canopy.”  Joint Meeting of the West Lakes and East Lakes Regional Divisions of the AAG, Valparaiso, IN, October 1996.

“Applicability of Remote Sensing Data in the Numerical Modeling.”  92nd Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers, Charlotte, NC, April 1996.

“Biophysical Influences of a Prairie on the Energy Fluxes.”  12th Conference on Biometeorology and Aerobiology, American Meteorological Society, Atlanta, GA, January 1996.
“Influence of Heterogeneous Land Surfaces on the Surface  Energy Budget at Meso- and Large Scales.” Association of  American Geographers Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, March 1995.

“Simulation of Latent- and Sensible-Heat Fluxes over the Konza Prairie with a Three-Dimensional Model.” Middle State Division, Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting,  Newark, DE, October 1993 (with C.J. Willmott and B. Hanson).

“Influence of Heterogeneous Land Surfaces on the  Surface Energy Budget--Topographic Influences.” Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA, April 1993.

“Reconstructions of the Southern Oscillation and Pacific Sea Surface Temperature from Dryness/Wetness in China for the Last 500 Years.” International Symposium on Global Climate Change.  Beijing, China, August 1990.

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Invited Lectures

Jie Song: “Impact of large-scale urban land use change on East Asian Summer Monsoon Climate”. Oct. 10-12, 2010, invited presentation at International workshop on “Impact of Asian Megacity Development on Local to Global Climate Change” Beijing. China.

Public lecture at Northern Illinois University on “Global Climate Models, the Science and the Output” March, 2007

Public Seminar “Human activity, global heating and challenges for sustainability” January 4, 2007 at Nanjing University of Finance and Economics, China

Song, J. “Quantifying the Exchange of Water and Energy between Land and Atmosphere in Semi-arid Area“ at the Coordinated Enhanced Observation Program meeting hold at UNESCO, Paris, France, Feb. 26-Mar. 3, 2006.

Invited lecture series on “Quantifying Exchanges in Energy and Water Fluxes between Land and Atmosphere.” Dec. 12-20, 2005 Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, China.

Graduate Colloquium presentation: “The role of soil and vegetation in the future climate”. April 1, 2005, Department of Geography.

Song, J. “A multi-layer soil scheme in ECHAM5 for climate simulation”, Aug. 11, 2004 at Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany.

Song, J., “Climatology of the nocturnal Low-level jet at the southern Great Plains atmospheric boundary layer experiment site.” The Chicago Chapter of the American Meteorological Society meeting, Nov. 2, 2004, Lewis University

Song, J. “The need for an Earth System Model---perspective from land surface” 2004 at Graduate Colloquium in Mathematics Department, Northern Illinois University.

Given an invited talk on June 28: past research activities on evaluating land surface processes using remote sensing and numerical models, and another invited talk on June 29: current and future research on the dynamic role of soil and vegetation in modeling future climate, while visiting Atmospheric Physics Institute, Academy of Chinese Science in Beijing, China. 2006.

“Influence of Heterogeneous Land Surfaces on the Surface Energy Budget at Large Scales,” presented at the University of Illinois Colloquium Series, September 1995.

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