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Videos on Teaching Effectiveness

Listed below are video resources available from the Center for faculty to check out for academic purposes within NIU. Click on the title of a video to read a brief description of its content. To request videos (not more than two at a time) for a one week loan, contact the Center. Selected videos (s), if available, will be reserved for you to pick them up from the Center. You will be notified if a video has been checked out, and your request will be included in the waiting list. Video (s) may be renewed for additional time if there is no waiting list. Please rewind the videos after use and return them promptly to the Center.

Video Category

Cat# Categories Video Ref#
A Multicultural, Disability and Diversity Issues #1 , #3 , #4 , #5 , #13 , #16 , #18 , #22 , #23 , #28 , #29 , #30 , #31 , #32 , #33 , #34 , #36 , #37 , #38 , #39 , #43 , #47 , #48 , #49
B Instructional Delivery Strategies #2 , #7 , #8 , #10 , #11 , #14 , #15 , #21 , #25 , #34 , #52 , #53 , #54
C Student Evaluation #1 , #14
D Handling Difficult Students #6 , #55
E Student Retention #27 , #56
F Curriculum Development #31
G Tips for Effective Instruction in Higher Education #9 , #12 , #14 , #15 , #17 , #19 , #20 , #21 , #24 , #32 , #36 , #38 , #52 , #53 , #54
H Active Learning #7 , #11 , #52 , #53
I Technology in Education #23 , #24 , #25, #26 , #27
J Safety Related Videos #40 , #41 , #42
K Research and Publications #44 , #45 , #46 , #50 , #51
Ref# Videotape Title Cat# Publisher/Author Length
1 Adapting to Students
a) Evaluating Students' Knowledge
b) Adjusting to Students' Diversity
A , C Stanford Univ. 45 min.
2 Art of Discussion Leading: a Class with Chris Christensen B Harvard Univ. 30 min.
3 Classroom Climate Workshops on Cultural Awareness A Purdue 
Univ.
30 min.
4 Classroom Climate Workshops on Gender Equity for Faculty Members A Purdue 
Univ.
32 min.
5 Cross-Cultural Communication in 
Higher Education
A DeAnza College Television. 90 min.
6 Dealing with Problems: Video Vignettes to Stimulate Discussion of Difficult Classroom Situations D Syracuse Univ. 16 min.
7 Effective Lecturing: Engaging Students
1.Actively Engaging Students 
2.Getting Students to Think
B , H Stanford Univ. 56 min.
8 Effective Lecturing: Getting Students' Attention B Stanford Univ. 67 min.
9 Faculty Development: Who Needs It? G Brigham Young Univ. 22 min.
10 How to Speak:
Lecture Tips from Patrick Winston
B Harvard Univ. 32 min.
11 Making Larger Classes Work B , H Indiana 
Univ.
38 min.
12 Models of Excellence G California State
Univ. Chico
23 min.
13 Race In The Classroom: A Multiplicity Of Experience A Harvard Univ. 19 min.
14 Sharing Learning Experiences: What Students Want From College Teachers B , C , G Eastern
Michigan Univ.
37 min.
15 Simplifying for Clarity
1. Teaching in Two Cycles
2. Structuring and Looking Back
B , G Stanford Univ. 51 min.
16 Taking Apart the Toaster: People with Disabilities in Engineering Careers
(w/closed caption)
A American Association for the Advancement of Science. 10:30 min.
17 Teaching in America:
A guide for international faculty
G Harvard Univ. 38 min.
18 Teaching in the Diverse Classroom A Univ. of
Washington
37 min.
19 Toward Effective Advising G Syracuse Univ. 60 min.
20 View of NIU 2000 G Northern Illinois Univ. 30 min.
21 What Students Want: Teaching From a Student's Perspective B , G Harvard Univ. 24 min.
22 Women in the Classroom: Cases for Discussion A Harvard Univ. 27 min.
23 Working Together: People with Disabilities and Computer Technology 
(w/closed caption)
A , I Univ. of Washington 14:25 min.
24 Are You History? Faculty Job Security in an Online World G , I PBS Telecast
10/12/00 
90 min.
25 With a Little Help from My Friends: Implementing Information Technology into the Curriculum B , I PBS Telecast
12/7/00
90 min.
26 Control, Conflict and Courseware: Intellectual Property in Online Education I PBS Telecast
2/8/01
90 min.
27 Faculty Issues in Online Learning Staying the Course E , I PBS Telecast
4/19/01 
28 Multicultural Education: Valuing Diversity A James R.Romero,
Ph.D. University of Oklahoma
1 hour 46 min.
29 Multicultural Education: Teaching to Diversity A Manny Brandt
University of Oklahoma
1 hour 28 min.
30 Education in a Multicultural Society A The Video Journal
of Education
34 min.
31 Developing Multicultural Curriculum A , F The Video Journal
of Education
35 min.
32 A Teachers Culture: Examine Your Cultural Past A , G Insight Media 32 min.
33 Learn from the Past- Plan for the Future: Multi-cultural Preferences vs. U.S. Dominant Culture A Insight Media Inc 34 min.
34 Developing Teaching Strategies for a Culturally Diverse Student Population A , B Insight Media Inc 49 min.
35 American Sons Steven Okazaki 28 min.
36 Dealing With Diversity in the Classroom A , G Inservice Video Network 20 min.
37 Social Class A Insight Media Inc 30 min.
38 Developing Teaching Strategies for a Culturally Diverse Student A , G Inservice Works Inc. 48 min.
39 Classroom Climate Workshop on Cultural Awareness A Purdue University Continuing Education 30 min.
40 Practicing Safe Science J Howard Hughes Medical Institute 30 min.
41 Assessing Risks of Toxic Chemicals J Howard Hughes Medical Institute 12 min.
42 Emergency Response J Howard Hughes Medical Institute 12 min.
43 Last Chance for Eden Part I A Lee Mun Wah 88 min
44 Publish, Don't Perish: Twelve Steps to Help Scholars Flourish Tape I K Tara Gray 1 hr 42 min
45 Publish, Don't Perish: Twelve Steps to Help Scholars Flourish Tape II K Tara Gray 54 min
46 Integrity in Scientific Research - Five Video Vignettes K The American Association for the Advancement of Sciences 44 min
47 Stolen Ground A Lee Mun Wah 44 min
48 Cross-Cultural Communication A Insight Media Inc 24 min
49 Religious Diversity in America A Insight Media Inc 24 min
50 Professional Ethics and Engineering K Insight Media Inc 15 min
51 Project Management: From Idea to Implementation K Insight Media Inc 50 min
52 Problem-Based Learning B , G , H Anker Publishing Inc 28 min
53
B , G , H Anker Publishing Inc 18 min
54
B , G Purdue University 55 min
55
D American University 27 min
56
E CBS 60 Minutes 14 min

Video Details

Ref# Video Descriptions
1 Adapting to Students
1. Evaluating Students' Knowledge
2. Adjusting to Students' Diversity

To adapt explanations of complex material to a diverse population of students, instructors must link elements of an explanation to students' life experiences, prior knowledge, and aptitudes. This video presents five methods for adapting instruction. Program 1 offers suggestions for adapting instruction to students. Program 2 presents three techniques for adjusting instruction to students' diversity. Includes 29-page booklet
2 Art of Discussion Leading: a Class with Chris Christensen
Harvard's Derek Bok Center invited Professor C. Roland "Chris" Christensen of Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration to initiate a group of apprentice teachers into the challenges of guiding discussion. The group reviews a case study with Dr. Christensen using discussion leading techniques.
3 Classroom Climate Workshops on Cultural Awareness
Video presents one exercise and two dramas that depict cultural awareness in college classrooms. The dramas are intended to stimulate questions about and promote discussion of cultural awareness. 

Facilitator Guide contains: introduction, objectives, components of workshop, outlines role of facilitator, provides questions to promote discussion during workshop, suggests actions steps educators can take & includes reference materials related to cultural awareness. 
4 Classroom Climate Workshops on Gender Equity for Faculty Members
Presents a simulated engineering class to demonstrate the subtle and not so subtle classroom behaviors that create gender inequity and how to revise those behaviors.

Includes 20 page Facilitator Guide for running faculty workshop.
5 Cross-Cultural Communication in Higher Education
Dr. Derald Wing Sue, professor of counseling psychology at California College of Professional Psychology, examines differences in communication styles among such groups as Asian-Americans, African-Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and European-Americans. Through vignettes of realistic student-faculty situations, Dr. Sue explores topics of nonverbal communication, nonverbals as triggers to fears and bias, high-low context communication, recognizing differences, and bridging the communication gap.
6 Dealing with Problems: Video Vignettes to Stimulate Discussion of Difficult Classroom Situations 
Video presents a series of short vignettes that can be used to stimulate discussion on difficult instructional situations. Vignettes enact topics such as: students talking in class, lab partner problems, student displays of prejudice, extra credit requests, sexual harassment missed classes, non-responsive students, exam quality and grading, gender discrimination, attendance, writing, cheating, syllabus, and prerequisites. 
7 Effective Lecturing: Engaging Students 
1. Actively Engaging Students
2. Getting Students to Think
Illustrates explicit ways to engage students during a lecture through active learning techniques that challenge students intellectually: posing questions and pausing; soliciting student questions; varying students' activities

Includes 28-page booklet
8 Effective Lecturing: Getting Students' Attention 
Video demonstrates presentation techniques that can be used in lectures to hold students' attention through making:  content provocative and inspiring; dramatic illustrations; use of nonverbal communication skills; suspense and surprise; self-disclosure and including cultural aspects. 

Includes 26-page booklet
9 Faculty Development: Who Needs It?
This video introduces faculty development in higher education. Vignettes dramatize difficulties and aspirations of a new faculty member, a department chair and a dean who raise issues about faculty career support, learning communities, teaching and research. Filmed against the backdrop of an international conference of the Professional and Organizational Development Network in High Education (POD), noted leaders suggest ideas and avenues for improving higher education.
10 How to Speak: Lecture Tips form Patrick Winston
Professor Patrick Winston of MIT gives advice on how to present an effective talk. The lecture is aimed at faculty members and teaching assistants who will be lecturing for the first time, as well as graduate students who are preparing to give their first job seminar. Throughout his talk, Winston illustrates his points by using the techniques he is discussing.
11 Making Larger Classes Work 
How can you move passive students into active learning? The video identifies areas of  faculty control and shows vignettes from various disciplines demonstrating techniques that develop constant attention as well as goodwill toward faculty and students.  Vignettes demonstrate how to:  communicate clearly; actively engage students; and manifest a caring attitude toward students.

Many useful techniques are demonstrated.
12 Models of Excellence
Video gives an engaging look at attributes that identify successful classroom teaching. Viewer gets an inside look at what makes for successful teaching from the student perspective, as well as from the teacher involved. Demonstrates classroom communication styles and behaviors that can be learned by others. 
13 Race In The Classroom: A Multiplicity Of Experience 
Video depicts moments in courses when race or culture, a race-related topic, or racial dynamics become a major factor in teaching and learning. Presents five vignettes that are ideal starting points for discussion on how college teachers can:  effectively address racially sensitive topics; teach classes with culturally diverse populations; and confront racially charged situations.

Includes 60-page Facilitator's Handbook
14 Sharing Learning Experiences: What Students Want From College Teachers 
Video addresses students' needs in four key areas: clarity, interactive teaching strategies, ongoing feedback, and respect and caring. Information presented comes from hundreds of course evaluations conducted in focus groups over a three-year period across disciplines in lectures, seminars, studios, and lab setting with both undergraduates and graduates of all ages. 
15 Simplifying for Clarity
1. Teaching in Two Cycles
2. Structuring and Looking Back
Simplifying is an important technique for clear teaching. By reducing the complexity of difficult material, simplifying alternately promotes student understanding and clarity in teaching. This video presents four methods to achieve simplification. Program 1 provides methods for simplifying the material by teaching it in two (or more) cycles while Program 2 presents three additional methods for simplifying instruction.

Includes 27-page booklet
16 Taking Apart the Toaster: People with Disabilities in Engineering Careers
(w/closed caption)
Actual engineering students and professionals with disabilities discuss how the use of technology has helped reduce barriers to their learning and employment in the field of engineering. The qualities that support engineering problem solving are the same qualities the individuals with disabilities demonstrate daily in overcoming the barriers they encounter in life. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is briefly mentioned, with a short explanation of the benefits of the act to those in the engineering field - giving equal opportunity by providing the technology that equalizing the access.
17 Teaching in America: A guide for international faculty
Practical advice on the culture of the American classroom, student expectations and techniques for teaching. Interviews with over 20 international faculty members and teaching fellows at Harvard deal with topics ranging form language problems to maintaining lively discussion.

Includes Bok Center pamphlet
18 Teaching in the Diverse Classroom
Award winning instructional videotape features faculty and students describing why it is important to recognize diversity in college classrooms. It also demonstrates how instructors can effectively teach in a diverse academic setting. Four general strategies are discussed: Include all students, recognize different ways individuals learn, promote respect in the classroom, and acknowledge diversity through curriculum choices. Examples are given showing how instructors apply the strategies. 
19 Toward Effective Advising
This video demonstrates both poor and good advising practices, and advising as teaching. Viewers are invited to consider the proper domain of academic advising and what advising skills might need to be developed. Student and faculty scenes demonstrate a wide variety of approaches to advising. The video concludes with critiquing the scenes and discussing advising issues by a group of five experienced faculty members and administrators. The interviews and advising scenes provide experiential material while the critique and discussion add a didactic element.
20 View of NIU 2000
Video highlights NIU's academic and research facilities, along with the resources available to students, faculty and surrounding communities. It also identifies the satellite campus sites, student demographics and benefits of attending NIU.
21 What Students Want: Teaching From a Student's Perspective 
Over 40 Harvard undergraduates reflect on what facilitates learning, their definitions of good and bad teaching and the nature of the student-teacher relationship. Video answers the questions of how students view teaching and what they find exciting and frustrating in the classroom. 
22 Women in the Classroom: Cases for Discussion 
Video presents a series of vignettes that address what prevents full participation of  women in academe and how classrooms can be made more open for them. It focuses on habits and styles of expression set in classrooms ranging from science and economics to women's studies. Also provides a series of "shorts," provocative one-liners on gender issues. 

Includes facilitator guide
23 Working Together: People with Disabilities and Computer Technology 
(w/closed caption)

The video demonstrates how the use of technology (i.e., computer, Internet, software programs, etc.) can benefit students with disabilities in the following areas: 1) low vision, 2) blindness, 3) hearing & speech impairment, 4) specific learning disabilities, 5) health & mobility impairments. The entire video is with closed caption and actual student-users comment on the benefits of using technology for education, work and social contact.
24 Are You History? Faculty Job Security in an Online World
Will I have a job, and will it be one worth having? This taped program deals head-on with faculty worries about employment and control of the teaching process, addressing the often unspoken but persistent fear plaguing faculty in today's increasingly online world.

Panelists analyze the issues raised by the rush toward technological delivery of higher education and how this movement will affect the current educational model. They examine some of the ways faculty jobs are already being transformed in an online world, as well as the implications for future faculty and students. The panelists also discuss whether the traditional role of a professor will become a thing of the past, and whether only the most privileged students will receive in-person instruction while everyone else's learning will be technology-based. The presentation also explains the steps faculty must take to prepare themselves for meaningful roles in an online world. (Video recording of 10/12/00 telecast)
25 With a Little Help from My Friends: Implementing Information Technology into the Curriculum
Kenneth Green, founder and director of the Campus Computing Project, joins a panel of educators to discuss issues relating to teaching with technology. Topics include: what support is necessary for faculty who wish to integrate IT into their teaching, assessing the benefits relative to the cost of technology, and many more. The presentation is the second in a four-part series brought to campus by the College of Education's Learning Center, Division of Continuing Education, Faculty Development and Instructional Design Center, Information Technology Services, Media Services, and University Libraries. (Video recording of 12/07/00 telecast)
26 Control, Conflict and Courseware: Intellectual Property in Online Education
Once a course is online, who owns it? Frequently, the person who develops course content is not the person who teaches the course. Not surprisingly, intellectual property has become a fundamental concern for faculty.

One viewpoint is that when digital materials are created as part of the regular process of teaching, the institution has at least an investment if not outright ownership. A dissenting viewpoint is that faculty are entitled to control of the copyright in order to safeguard their legal rights, academic freedom, and the quality of their courses. 
(Video recording of 02/08/01 telecast)

This presentation addresses such topics as: colleges and universities as stakeholders in online course materials; the range of institutional and faculty viewpoints; models for ownership of course and course materials among faculty, staff and institutions; the difference between course ownership and course control; the implications of intellectual property on academic freedom; work-made-for-hire contracts, exemptions and fair use issues; fairness, conflict resolution and collegiality
27 Faculty Issues In Online Learning Staying the Course: Retaining Online Students  (Video recording of 04/19/01 PBS telecast) 
Student attrition is one of the biggest obstacles to the credibility-and as a result, the success-of online learning. Retention and completion rates for online courses are 10-20% lower than those for traditional in-person courses. Improving retention is vital both to students' academic success and the institution's viability. This video examines what steps can increase retention even before students enroll. Intervention strategies are offered for helping students after the course has begun. 

Other topics include: the lack of agreement on the definition of retention and academic achievement; characteristics of successful online students; features of good online courses; roles and responsibilities of faculty
28 Multicultural Education: Valuing Diversity 
Dr. Romero of the Southwest Center for Relations Studies at the University of Oklahoma, provides information relating to the culture of teaching, student culture, and ethnic diversity and provides strategies by which teachers can learn to work more successfully with a more diverse population. The primary goal of the session is to assist teachers and administrators in recognizing the importance of culture and to begin to value diversity. 
29 Multicultural Education: Teaching to Diversity 
Manny Brandt, of the Southwest Regional Center for Drug-Free Schools and communities, provides practical suggestions for educators so they may work successfully with an increasingly culturally diverse student population. The primary goal of the presentation is to assist tachers in developing instructional strategies for meeting the communication and intercultural learning needs of diverse groups. 
30 Education in Multicultural Society  (Video recording of The Video Journal of Education) 
Carlos Cortes presents the following points in this video presentation: discover a model for empowering students to function in a mainstream society; draw upon the abundant resources in your environment; prepare youngsters to contribute to society  
31 Developing Mulitcultural Curriculum  (Video recording of The Video Journal of Education) 
Carlos Cortes presents the following points in this video presentation: focus on unique differences and unique differences and uniting similarities; learn how to develop and implement a multicultural curriculum; see the positive effect on students  
32 A Teacher's Culture: Examine Your Cultural Past  (Video recording of Inservice Works Inc.) 
Reflect on your personal cultural beliefs and biases as you create your own cultural genogram. Gain insights into your cultural experiences and preferences. Review cultural value preferences and see how your cultural background is brought to the classroom aas your students' backgrounds. 
33 Learn from the Past-Plan for the future: Multi-cultural Preferences vs. U.S. Dominant Culture  (Video recording of Inservice Works  Inc.) 
Become familiar with how cultures may differ in what their members' value. Study the different traditions and value preferences between the dominant U.S. culture and other cultures. These include differing views of family relationships, how the teacher is viewed, and how extended family may be called upon to confer with the child's teacher. 
34 Developing Teaching Strategies for a Culturally Diverse Student Population  (Video recording of Insight Media Inc.) 
This video seminar presents guidelines for becoming a culturally sensitive teacher, explaining how to use cultural information to improve classroom instruction and parent-teacher conferences. It features interviews with both students and faculty. 
35 American Sons (Video recording of Farallon Films.) 
This video breaks the silence of Asian American and shatters the model minority myth. It presents a painful and angry view of American life never before explored in a motion picture or television program. It looks at difficult issues, such as hate violence, and examines the deep psychological damage that racism does over generations. It is an intimate and disturbing exploration of how prejudice, bigotry and violence twists and demeans individual lives.
36 Dealing with Diversity in the Classroom (Video recording of Inservice Video Network.) 
Kenneth J. Doka Ph.D narrates this video explaining how demographic changes have affected education and shifted policy from "melting pot" assimilation to cultural pluralism, this video stresses the importance of understanding and respecting a student's culture. It also discusses how to organize a classroom and curriculum to make students from different backgrounds feel welcome and equal.
37 Social Class (Video recording of Insight Media.) 
Is social stratification in the United States inherently discriminatory? This video shows how social class determines the lifestyles, world views, and opportunities of two teenaged girls. The program also covers such issues as social mobility, poverty, perceptions of social class, and the measurement of social inequality.
38 Developing Teaching Strategies for a culturally Diverse Student (Video recording of Inservice Works Inc.) 
This video seminar presents guidelines for becoming a culturally sensitive teacher, explaining how to use cultural information to improve classroom instruction and parent-teacher conferences. It features interviews with both students and faculty.
39 Classroom Climate Workshop on Cultural Awareness (Video recording of Purdue University Continuing Education.) 
Dr. Lisa Anderson Professor of English and African American Studies facilitates this interactive video produced to improve college classroom climates. The objectives of this video are: atimulate awareness of cultural issues in classrooms; explore the need to change attitudes related to cultures; action steps in order to achieve cultural awareness in the classroom.
40 Practicing Safe Science ( Video recording of Howard Hughes Medical Institute)
Topics include: demonstrations of good safety techniques; re-enactments of actual laboratory accidents; questions that challenge you to recognize risks in the laboratory
41 Assessing Risks of Toxic Chemicals (Video recording of Howard Hughes Medical Institute)
This video provides guidance for accessing risks of toxic chemicals used in the modern biology laboratory. It is intended to supplement the formal instruction provided in each institution and each laboratory. This video is not a substitute for a safety training program.

"perhaps our notion of what's dangerous and what's not dangerous and what proper practice should be is distorted from the controversy that surrounded recombinant DNA technology. When it was introduced, procedures which most thoughtful people felt should be really addressed with a certain level of safety were exaggerated perhaps in the public mind. And, when there isn't a sufficient justification for a safety procedure, it losses its meaning and you lose respect for it. That is important to overcome because when you do work in a laboratory there are reagents in the laboratory and procedures that are very worthy of this kind of respect that's necessary to deal with them."
Phillip Leders, M.D., HHMI Senior Investigator, Harvard Medical SChool


Sensible risk assessment is an essential part of any experiment involving toxic chemicals. Good first steps are seeking the advice of colleagues who have experience in handling toxic chemicals, and checking reliable references. This National Research Council's Prudent Practices in the Laboratory is a valuable resources; Material Safety Data Sheets identify hazards and provide important toxicological information.

Risk assessment requires planning to determine the risks involved and to select the appropriate safety measures. Two principle should guide your planning: substitution with less toxic substances whenever possible; use of the smallest amount of material that is practical.

Good planning requires a close look at the extent of exposure. Always consider dose, duration and frequency of exposure, and potential route of exposure. The truth is, it is not the exotic or highly toxic substances that may cause the most harm in the laboratory. Even the familiar and frequently handled chemicals requires respect. 
42 Emergency Response (Video recording of Howard Hughes Medical Institute)

No one intends to have an accident; everyone should know how to response to one. This video provides guidance for responding to emergencies in the modern biology laboratory. It will introduce new staff to appropriate emergency response procedures and provide a general review in emergency response for the more experienced laboratory worker.

"You can make sure that everyone in the lab is conscious of those possibilities are foreseeable. And, in a more general sense, make everyone conscious that they are their brother's keeper. ...Pay attention to your neighbors. If they're doing something that is unwise, let them know. Keep the corner of your eye open to what's going on - new students, new post docs - what they're up to. Their healthy is your healthy and vice verse."
Michael M. Rosbash, Ph. D, Investigator, HHMI


Procedures are presented for responding to the following emergencies: laboratory fire; radiation spill; chemical spill; biological spill; personal injury; clothing on fire; skin contamination; eye exposure; cuts and puncture wounds
43 Last Chance for Eden Part I (Lee Mun Wah)
From the award winning director of The Color of Fear, comes Lee Mun Wah's long awaited film about nine women and men who began an honest and emotionally charged conversation about how racism and sexism have affected their lives and families
44 Publish, Don't Perish: Twelve Steps to Help Scholars Flourish Tape I (Tara Gray)
The perception persists that productive scholars are born not made. However, research shows that scholars can publish more by taking these twelve steps. Includes 15 page booklet. (Tape 1 of 2)
45 Publish, Don't Perish: Twelve Steps to Help Scholars Flourish Tape II (Tara Gray)
The perception persists that productive scholars are born not made. However, research shows that scholars can publish more by taking these twelve steps. (Tape 2 of 2)
46 Integrity in Scientific Research - Five Video Vignettes (The American Association for the Advancement of Sciences)
Vignette I: Only a Bridge: Highlights issues related to intellectual property, disclosure of privileged information, sharing information in science, crediting the work of others, and the responsibilities of collaborators who encounter questionable conduct by a colleague (7.5 min).

Vignette II: Noah's Dilemma: Explores the competitive pressures scientists experience to get the data "right" and to publish their findings, mentoring responsibilities, loyalty to and honesty with one's collaborators, and the selection and reporting of data and record keeping (8.5 min).

Vignette III: Of Mice and Mendoza: Sharing in Science: Focuses on issues related to the consequences of industrial support for the sharing of data and resources, the role of technology transfer, the effects of commingling public and private funds, and the stress that scientists encounter in the face of conflicting professional values, legal obligations, and loyalty to colleagues (9 min).

Vignette IV: Where Credit id Due: Touches on issues related
47 Stolen Ground (Lee Mun Wah)
Stolen Ground puts a human face on the lingering effects of racism while giving us a rare glimpse, through the eyes of six Asian American men, about the impact of racism on their lives and families. Through their personal stories and intimate reflections as the "model minority", they provide a seldom seen portrait of the extent of their journey through anguish, pain and disillusionment.
48 Cross-Cultural Communication (Video recording of Insight Media Inc.) 
Providing a sociological and psychological perspective on cross-cultural communication, this video explores the nature and significance of cultural variations in manners, dress, and public behavior; business logic and negotiation style; paralanguage and proxemics; speech patterns and conversation; power issues; stereotyping and rejudice; and miscommunication. It emphasizes the importance of good listening skills and stresses the need for empathy and compassion in cross-cultural relations.
49 Religious Diversity in America (Video recording of Insight Media Inc.) 
This video looks at the variety of religious beliefs and practices in the United States, focusing on Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, and Buddhism. It highlights terms, definitions, and customs that influence the way the members of these religious groups live their lives.  
50 Professional Ethics and Engineering (Video recording of Insight Media Inc.) 
Recognizing the growing  importance of ethics in professional engineering, the Accrediting Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) continues to insist that ethics play an important role in educating young engineers. This video highlights common ethical dilemmas that engineers face in the work environment.  
51 Project Management (Video recording of Insight Media Inc.) 
This video teaches how to manage any project from the planning stages to finalization. It discusses time-lines and schedules and includes exercises the demonstrate how to conceive, plan, implement, and evaluate with confidence. 
52 Problem-Based Learning (Video from Anker Publishing Inc) 
Barbara Lohse Knous of Kansas State University explains and demonstrates the six basic steps of problem-based learning: problem presentation, hypothesis generation, additional information needed, justification of information needed, identification of learning issues, and problem closure. Using a class on renal nutrition as an example, each of the steps is engagingly demonstrated as the class works on a problem-based learning project. Knous also describes how to evaluate students engaged in problem-based learning and recommends specific tools for doing so. 

This video details steps for training faculty who are interested in using problem-based learning and ends with comments by students that address how this strategy promotes teamwork and active learning, applies learning, and provides challenge.
53 Thinking Together: Collaborative Learning in Science (Video recording from Harvard University)
Three models of collaborative learning - an introductory physics lecture, a lesson in celestial navigation, and a section in physical chemistry - taped in Harvard classrooms. In each class, students discuss problems and devise solutions with the help of their instructors and peers. Includes interviews and classroom scenes. Blue Ribbon winner, 1993 American Film & Video Association.
54 Handling Hordes: Teaching Large Classes (Video recording from Purdue University)
This video tape presents information, insights, and tips Professor Reece McGee has learned while teaching very large classesfor over 20 years at Purdue University. The video program shows hoe instructors in mass classes can offer the best learning experience for students while maintaining their own sanity.

Topics include: how to organize a course from scratch, with a timetable for doing it. It describes the things you'll need to do ahead of time so you can go into the first day of class with confidence; handling "problem students"; discipline in the mass class; the personal issues, anxieties, and bugaboos about teaching that all teachers experience, but which strike large class teachers with special force.

The Handling Hordes program is a lecture, geared to the universal issues that came up in dozens of workshops Professor McGee presented on the subject - the items other teachers of very large classes found problematic in actual experience or were fearful of. The information in the video program is applicable to any academic discipline. 
   
55 Civility in the Classroom (Video recording from American University)
This video addresses common forms of uncivil conduct that can disrupt classroom instruction. It is produced in a humorous and interactive format that encourages participants to reflect on and discuss these issues in a meaningful way. The video includes three vignettes that can stimulate constructive discussion about civil conduct in the classroom, how behavior affects the learning environment, and the skills for addressing incivility in a respectful and effective manner.
56 Echo Boomers (Video recording from CBS 60 Minutes)
Meet the "echo boomers," the children of the biggest generation in American history, the baby boomers. Born between the early 1980s and the early 1990s, the 80 million echo boomers are already having a huge impact on the economy. They are rapidly becoming one of the most studied generations in history -- by sociologists, demographers, and marketing consultants who want a piece of the $170 billion they spend each year. This is a CBS 60 Minutes video segment by Steve Kroft.

Last Updated: 2/15/2008