Degrees & Courses

Spring 2012

January 17 – May 10, 2012

Online Courses

REGISTRATION | COSTS | LOCATION | OFF-CAMPUS COURSESONLINE COURSES

Course Descriptions
ANTH | BIOS | ECON | GEOG | HIST | POLS | WOMS

Additional Online Courses
ENVS

 


 

 

Indians of North America
ANTH 303: YE1, Class #7890

This course will describe and analyze the cultures of native peoples of North America. The diversity of social, economic, religious life, languages and arts of representative Indian groups from the various geographic regions will be covered. Established pre-Columbian patterns, experiences with European colonization, culture change, and 20th century reconfigurations will be discussed. This course will be web-based with 3 face-to-face meetings and will use a combination of online topic modules, text readings, formal lecture, topical videos, in-class "hands-on" small group and whole class exercises, and ongoing discussion.

Catalog Description: Description and analysis of the cultures of native peoples of North America. Social, economic, and religious life; languages and arts of representative North American Indian groups.

Judith Calleja (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at Waubonsee Community College in the Academic and Professional Center (APC) 170, Thursdays, 02/02, 03/22 and 5/10, 6:30 – 9:15 pm.

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Evolution and the Creationist Challenge
BIOS 442/542: YE1, Class #s 7897/7884

The perennial culture wars raging in the USA are expressed in many areas of society. One area of attack is the opposition by the Religious Right to the teaching of evolution in public schools. Since before the famous "Scopes Monkey Trial" in 1925, school boards and legislatures have tried to eliminate, add equal doses of creationism to, or water down the coverage of evolution. They have targeted evolution as a cause for many of their perceived "social evils," don't understand science, and cannot separate evolution from "Social Darwinism."

This course will introduce students to the history of the controversy, define the opposition, and explain where each side gets their ideas and what they believe. We will then explore philosophy of science in enought detail to be able to separate a scientific question from a non-scientific question. A preliminary survey of primarily biological evolution will provide students with the necessary information to counter creationist arguments. This course is designed to give students the ability to not only defend evolution but, more importantly, attack non-scientific intrusions into the public school system. It is not a course in biological evolution but complementary, and can be taken by any upper-level undergraduate with an interest in science and society.

Catalog Description: Evolutionary theory and tenets of present-day anti-evolutionists with emphasis on providing students with the skills to articulate the theory of evolution as it applies to the biological sciences. Not designed as a substitute for a formal course in evolutionary theory. Tecommended for students pursuing careers in secondary science education.

Ronald Toth (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/30 - 05/07. No face-to-face meetings. Students should consult orientation videos posted in the course content.

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Income Distribution and Poverty
ECON 370B: YE1, Class #7904

This course will examine the theory of income, inequality, discrimination and wealth. It will include an analysis and measurement of welfare, poverty, and an evaluation of the efficiency of public policy.

Catalog Description: Topics of current importance to consumers, resource owners, business, and government. May be repreated once as topics change. PRQ: ECON 260 and ECON 261.

Sowjanya Dharmasankar (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-Naperville in Room 131, Saturdays, 02/04, 03/24 and 03/31, 1 - 4 pm.

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Maps and Mapping
GEOG 256/556: YE1, Class #s 7893/7894
 

Though maps have been used by civilizations for well over 5,000 years, practically all aspects of mapping today involve computers—from the collection of real-world data by GPS or satellites to drafting and printing. Rather than study the history of maps and mapping, we will instead study the concept of maps as tools of modern communication and visualization. This course is also the starting point for NIU's certificate of undergraduate study in GIS (in addition to applying toward the B.G.S.) and is required for several further courses in geography. Mandatory introductory face-to-face class meeting. 

Catalog Description, GEOG 256: Introduction to maps as models of our earth, tools of visualization, and forms of graphic communication. Use of satellite and aerial imagery, land surveying, and geographic information systems in map production. Thematic maps and how they are used. Map design for informational and persuasive purposes.
Catalog Description, GEOG 556: For graduate students with little formal background in mapping. Maps as models, tools of visualization, and forms of graphic communication. Processes of map production, including imagery and surveying. Principles of map design.

Kory Allred (3 credit hours)

  • Online with a mandatory face-to-face meeting at NIU-Naperville in Room 115 on Monday, 01/23, 6:30 – 9:15 pm.

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Severe and Hazardous Weather
GEOG 306: YE1, Class # 7908

Examination of fundamentals of atmospheric phenomena with an emphasis on understanding concepts and processes behind severe manifestations of weather and climate. Physical aspects of extratropical cyclones, winter weather phenomena, thunderstorm phenomena, tropical weather systems, and large-scale longer-term weather events are analyzed. Case studies are employed to investigate human, economic, and environmental consequences of extreme weather and climate events.

Catalog Description: Examination of fundamentals of atmospheric phenomena with an emphasis on understanding concepts and processes behind severe manifestations of weather and climate. Physical aspects of extratropical cyclones, winter weather phenomena, thunderstorm phenomena, tropical weather systems, and large-scale, longer-term weather events are analyzed. Case studies are employed to investigate human, economic, and environmental consequences of extreme weather and climate events.

Walker Ashley (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/23 - 05/07. No face-to-face meetings.

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Geography of the U.S. and Canada
GEOG 330: YE1, Class #7892

This course is an introduction to geographic issues in various regions of the United States and Canada. You will be introduced to some major patterns and processes that dominate the major physical and cultural realms of this region. We will first go over some basic physical and social features common to the United States and Canada. We then will explore the historical evolution and unique physical, cultural, and environmental features of fourteen sub-regions, following your textbook. Rather that just describing each region, we will examine the various regions in an attempt to understand and explain regional differences. Ultimately, our exploration of these regions should help us all reach a deeper understanding of the diversity and complexity of life in the United States and Canada. A final project, map quizzes, and exams will all be utilized to increase your knowledge of this diverse and fascinating region.

Catalog Description: Regional analysis of two countries. Cultural, economic, and political patterns. Geographic perspectives applied to curren issues and problems.

Sharon Ashley (3 credit hours)

  • Online with a mandatory face-to-face meeting at NIU-Naperville in Room 167, Wednesday, 01/18, 6:30 – 9:15 pm.

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Introduction to GIS
GEOG 359/557: YE1, Class #s 8115/8117

Have you ever asked yourself, "Where in the world am I?" GEOG 359 may help you answer that question with an introductory study into the principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). In this online course, we develop skills in GIS, its components, and how it applies to our surrounding environment. This course is a primer for those who are interested in learning more about the dynamic and ever-changing world of GIS and its career applications.

Catalog Description, GEOG 359: Study of the fundamental principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Emphasis on the development of these systems, their components and their integration into mainstream geography. PRQ: GEOG 256 or consent of department.
Catalog Description, GEOG 557: For graduate students with little formal background in GIS or computer mapping. Principles, components, and uses of geographic information systems. PRQ: GEOG 552 or GEOG 556, or consent of department. 

Philip Young (3 credit hours)

  • Online with a mandatory face-to-face meeting at NIU-Rockford in Room 165, Tuesday, 01/17, 6:30-9:15 pm.

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Land-use Planning/Regional Planning
GEOG 455/659: YE1, Class #s 7898/7899

Land Use Planning/Regional Planning is a course designed to study the processes and policies concerning land development decisions. Mapping and GIS decision-making techniques are applied to the analysis of urban growth and land-use patterns at global, national, state, regional, and local scales. Hands-on exercises developed for Google Earth and other GIS software incorporate land, environmental, demographic, and business information to demonstrate typical planning scenarios. In addition to applying towards the B.G.S., this call also counts toward NIU's certificate of undergraduate study in Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

Catalog Description, GEOG 455: Study of processes and policies in land use and land development decisions. Mapping and GIS decision-making techniques applied to the analysis of land-use patterns and management conflicts at national, states regional, and local government scales. Lecture, laboratory, and field experience.
Catalog Description, GEOG 659: Geographic basis and practice of regional mapping, GIS, and spatial decision processes applied to land-use, social services, transportation, and environmental management concerns. Problems of integrating land, transportation, and environmental management over a multijurisdictional geography.

Richard Greene (3 credit hours)

  • Online with a mandatory face-to-face meeting at Elgin Community College in the Health & Business Technology Bldg. 162, Tuesday, 01/17, 6:30 – 9:15 pm.

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Workshop in GIS
GEOG 468/568: YE1, Class #s 8118/8119

What are the essential building blocks required to create an effective Geographic Information System? This online course will use GIS software for the creation, manipulation, and presentation of data. The methodology will be a blended set of lessons and exercises which will include design, data capture, quality control, data management, and 3D. Students enrolled in the Homeland Security Program, GIS Certificate, or B.G.S. degree plan may be interested in taking this course.

Catalog Description, GEOG 468: Problems and techniques of GIS prototype development. Emphasis on GIS development and spatial database management for public sector applications such as land parcel mapping, emergency services, facilities management, and homeland security. The processes of design and production, editing and quality control, and final implementation of an operational product are stressed through applied projects. PRQ: GEOG 359 and consent of department.
Catalog Description, GEOG 568: Problems and techniques of GIS prototype development. Emphasis on GIS development and spatial database management for public sector applications such as land parcel mapping, emergency services, facilities management, and homeland security. The processes of design and production, editing and quality control, and final implementation of an operational product are stressed through applied projects. PRQ: GEOG 557 and consent of department.
 

Philip Young (3 credit hours)

  • Online with a mandatory face-to-face meeting at Elgin Community College in the Health & Business Technology Bldg. 162, Thursday, 01/19, 6:30 – 9:15 pm.

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The United States and Southeast Asia
HIST 475: YE1, Class #7912

This course will examine the interactions between the United States and Southeast Asia. Running the gamut from economic aid to internal meddling to full scale war, the United States has had an intense relationship with all countries of Southeast Asia. Drawing on primary source foreign relations documents and secondary source historical readings, we will learn together about US-Southeast Asian interactions and students will research the histories of those entanglements.

Catalog Description: Focus on 20th century, including American acquisition and governance of the Philippine Islands, the American response to nationalism and independence movements, the war in Vietnam, the successive tragedies in Cambodia, and U.S.-China rivalries in the region.

Eric Jones (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at Waubonsee Community College in Bodie Hall 102, Tuesdays, 01/31, 03/20, and 05/08, 6:30 – 9:15 pm.

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American Presidential Elections
POLS 300: YE1, Class #7916

Bachmann, Cain, Gingrich, Paul, Perry, Romney...the 2012 presidential campaign is well underway with incumbent President Barack Obama (D) facing a large group of potential GOP contestants. The primary season is expected to begin earlier than ever -- perhaps as early as December 2011 -- with subsequent contests taking place throughout the spring. Who are the candidates, what are the issues, and how does 2012 compare to past election years? These are the central questions we will be exploring in this online course. Through readings, on-line discussions, and multimedia, we will follow the current candidates and primaries throughout the semester, as well as take a look back at previous contests for the presidency, paying particular attention to the more recent, modern period. How similar or differenct is 2012 from previous years? Who will be the Republican nominee? Can the president win reelection?

Catalog Description: Survey and analysis of candidates, issues, and partisan trends in presidential elections from the era of the New Deal to the present. Also considers how election rules and campaign styles have changed over time. Recommended: At least sophomore standing.

Art Ward (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at NIU-Rockford in Room 165, Thursdays, 02/02, 03/22, and 05/10, 6:30 – 9:15 pm.

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Game Design: Introducing Young Women to Technology
WOMS 424/524: YE1, Class #s 8112/8123

This class will explore some of the reasons that young women avoid computer programming, although it is an important and enjoyable field for women. Students will work in groups to design and implement their own game after writing variations of several well-known existing games. The course is open to women and men of all backgrounds. No experience with computer programming is required or expected. Students need access to broadband internet and a PC where they can install the Game Maker software.

Catalog Description: Selected issues and topics pertaining to gender and science, technology, engineering and mathematics; how gender and sexuality are defined by and define these fields; contributions of women to scientific developments.

Georgia Brown and Reva Freedman (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at Waubonsee Community College in Weigel Hall 236, Mondays, 01/30, 03/19, and 05/07, 6:30 – 9:15 pm.

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Women's Self-Representation
WOMS 430: YE1, Class #7879

This course will take a multidisciplinary feminist approach to women's self-representation using theories from psychology, history, literature, and art history to examine the ways that women in different times and cultures represent themselves and their relationships to broader social and cultural forces. We may draw on women's letters, diaries, autobiographical writings, self-portraits, and public speeches.

Catalog Description: May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours as topic changes. PRQ: Junior or senior standing or consent of director.

Lise Schlosser (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at NIU-Hoffman Estates in Room 124, Thursdays, 02/02, 03/22, and 05/10, 6:30 – 9:15 pm.

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The History of Women in Western Art
WOMS 430/ARTH 485: YE2, Class #s 8008/8007

In this course, we will examine the history of women as both creators and subjects of visual art in the West. Considerations will be given to how gender is relevant to the definition, creation, and appreciation of art. Through online lectures, readings, assignments, and online discussions, students will be able to: understand and discuss the diversity of women's artistic expressions throughout history and diverse western cultures; analyze and articulate the influence that gender, race, sexual orientation, economic class, and other aspects of identity have on the creation and reception of women's art forms; and assess the implications of gender on definitions of art and the writing or art history.

Catalog Description, WOMS 430: May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours as topic changes. PRQ: Junior or senior standing or consent of director.
Catalog Description, ARTH 485: Topics announced. May be repeated, but credit is limited to 3 semester hours per topic.
 

Rebekah Kohli (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at NIU-Rockford in Room 201, Saturdays, 02/04, 03/24, and 05/05, 1 – 4 pm.

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Green Technologies
ENVS 305: YE1, Class #7784

Catalog Description: Introduction to engineering and technological advances which are more environmentally friendly and new technologies that utilize green principles and green transportation. Includes topics in new areas of green manufacturing and materials used today and planned for the future, including the operation and manufacture of solar cells and the production of wind, thermal, and hydroelectric power. Topics will vary depending upon new trends in industry. On-site visits to green industries in the region. PRQ: CHEM 110 and MATH 155. 

Xueshu Song (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/16 - 05/12.

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