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Fall 2017

Regular Session
August 28 - December 16, 2017

Off-Campus Courses
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Online Courses

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Course Descriptions
BIOS | ECON | ENGL | FLCL |GEOG | ILAS | PHIL |PHYS |POLS | PSPA | PSYC | STAT


ATTENTION BGS STUDENTS: You will apply for graduation during the semester in which you register for your final term. You should meet with your adviser to determine that you are registering for the correct courses. You and your adviser must be certain that your file in Registration and Records is complete and accurate with all documents (transcripts, grade changes, substitutions, adviser approval letters) and information necessary for graduation. Please carefully review your Academic Advising Report for accuracy. It is your responsibility to contact your advisor with any questions regarding discrepancies that appear on this report. You may review your Academic Advising Report through MyNIU

The deadline for applying for December/Fall 2017 graduation is September 1, 2017. You must have at least 90 total semester hours to apply for graduation. The $29.00 graduation fee will be billed to your student account. Absolutely no late applications will be accepted.

Registration for Fall 2016 begins the week of April 4, 2016. Registration appointments are assigned based on the number of cumulative hours. Beginning early March, students may check MyNIU for their appointment day and time. Students may register on or after the assigned appointment day and time as long as there are not any holds assigned to their record. All new undergraduate students are allowed to register after meeting with an academic advisor following their orientation session (providing the appointment day and time has been reached).

If you are unfamiliar with the MyNIU system and/or need assistance, please visit
erptraining.niu.edu/erptraining/myniu-sa/studentcenter.shtml

Courses titled with a computer means that the class is offered online.

 

 

BIOS 442/542

 

Evolution and the Creationist Challenge
BIOS 442/542: YE1, Class #s 7703/7704

The perennial culture wars raging in the USA are expressed in many areas of society. One area of attack is the opposition by the Religious Right to the teaching of evolution in public schools. Since before the famous “Scopes Monkey Trial” in 1925, school boards and legislatures have tried to eliminate, add equal doses of creationism to, or water down the coverage of evolution. They have targeted evolution as a cause for many of their perceived “social evils,” don’t understand science, and cannot separate evolution from “Social Darwinism.”

This course will introduce students to the history of the controversy, define the opposition, and explain where each side gets their ideas and what they believe. We will then explore the philosophy of science in enough detail to be able to separate a scientific question from a non-scientific question. A preliminary survey of primarily biological evolution will provide students with the necessary information to counter creationist arguments. This course is designed to give students the ability to not only defend evolution but, more importantly, attack non-scientific intrusions into the public school system. It is not a course in biological evolution but complementary, and can be taken by any upper-level undergraduate with an interest in science and society.

Catalog Description: Evolutionary theory and tenets of present-day anti-evolutionists with emphasis on providing students with the skills to articulate the theory of evolution as it applies to the biological sciences. Not a substitute for a formal course in evolutionary theory. Recommended for students pursuing careers in secondary science education.

Ron Toth (3 credit hours)

  • Online 

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BIOS 493

 

Topics in Biology: Introduction to Botany
BIOS 493 YE1, Class #7705

 

Lectures, discussions, and reports on topics of special interest in a particular field of biology.  Topics may be selected in one or more fields of biology to a total of six semester hours toward any one degree.

Ron Toth (3 credit hours)

  • Online 

 

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ECON 341

 

Economic Area Studies
ECON 341: YE1, Class #7706

Catalog Description: May be repeated to a maximum of 9 semester hours, but each topic may be taken only once. PRQ: ECON 260 and ECON 261.

Sowjanya Dharmasankar (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 2 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-Naperville, Saturdays, 09/16, 10 - 11 am and 10/28, 10 am - 1 pm.

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ECON 370

 

Current Economic Issues:  Health Economics
ECON 370: YE1, Class #7707

Catalog Description: Topics of current importance to consumers, resource owners, business, and government.  May be repeated up to 6 hours as topics change.  PRQ: Econ 260 and ECON 261.

Sowjanya Dharmasankar (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 2 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-Naperville, Saturdays, 09/16, 11 am - 12 pm and 11/04, 10 am - 1 pm.

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ENGL 308

 

Technical Writing
ENGL 308: YE1, Class #7656

In this fully online class, students will study the principles and strategies for planning, writing, and revising technical documents common in government, business, and industry. Some of the topics covered in this class are audience analysis and purpose, writing effectively, simplifying complex information, writing instructions, and document design.

The class will “meet” in Blackboard Learn where students will find video lectures, video demonstrations, assignment information, discussion boards, and a journal space. Students will also use an online space provided by the textbook publisher to watch video presentations, complete exercises related to the weekly reading assignment, and take quizzes.

The e-textbook Technical Communication, 10th edition (2012), by Mike Markel, is included in the online course space, YourTechCommClass. An access code can be purchased at the University Bookstore and VCB. It can also be purchased online at http://courses.bfwpub.com/yourtechcommclass/student-access.php. Students can also register their access code at this address.

Catalog Description: Principles and strategies for planning, writing, and revising technical documents common in government, business, and industry (e.g., manuals, proposals, procedures, newsletters, brochures, specifications, memoranda, and formal reports). Topics include analysis of audience and purpose, simplifying complex information, document design, and project management.

Jan Knudsen (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12/16.

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ENGL 308

 

Technical Writing
ENGL 308: YE2, Class #7657

 

Catalog Description: Principles and strategies for planning, writing, and revising technical documents common in government, business, and industry (e.g., manuals, proposals, procedures, newsletters, brochures, specifications, memoranda, and formal reports). Topics include analysis of audience and purpose, simplifying complex information, document design, and project management.

Staff (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12/16.

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FLCL 271

 

Classical Mythology
FLCL 271: YE1/0003, Class #7658/3059

Catalog Description: An interdisciplinary approach to Greek and Roman myths, including their historical and contemporary relevance.

Laura Steele (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12/16.

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GEOG 253

 

Environment and Society
GEOG 253: 0002, Class #7784

Catalog Description: Introduction to the study of human-environment interactions from a geographic perspective, with emphasis on the role of humans in changing the face of the earth. Fundamentals of environmental science as well as global and local issues related to human population growth, agriculture, water resources, biodiversity, forest resources, energy use, climate change, and environmental health.

Anil Shrestha (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12/16.

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GEOG 256/556

 

Maps and Mapping/Fundamentals of Mapping
GEOG 256/556: YE1, Class #s 7659/7660

Though maps have been used by civilizations for well over 5,000 years, practically all aspects of mapping today involve computers – from the collection of real-world data by GPS or satellites, to drafting and printing. Rather than study the history of maps and mapping, we will instead study the concept of maps as tools of modern communication and visualization. This course is also the starting point for NIU’s certificate of undergraduate study in Geographic Information Systems (in addition to applying toward the B.G.S.) and is required for several further courses in geography.

Catalog Description, GEOG 256: Introduction to maps as models of our earth, tools of visualization, and forms of graphic communication. Use of satellite and aerial imagery, land surveying, and geographic information systems in map production. Thematic maps and how they are used. Map design for informational and persuasive purposes. Two hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory.
Catalog Description, GEOG 556: For graduate students with little formal background in mapping. Maps as models, tools of visualization, and forms of graphic communication. Processes of map production, including imagery and surveying. Principles of map design.

Autumn James/Andrew Krmenec (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online courses, 08/28 - 12/16

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GEOG 303

 

Water Resources and the Environment
GEOG 303: YE1, Class #7661

This course is intended to provide the student with a broader understanding of water and its importance to our lives and earth’s complex environment. We will consider issues facing water such as whether the supply of water will continue, how man-made developments have altered water availability, how pollution has eroded this natural resource, and where/how we can restore our water resources. Relevant video clips, online tutorials, and supplemental readings will be used throughout the course to provide examples of water-related issues affecting northern Illinois, other regions of the U.S., as well as various countries around the world.

Catalog Description: Evaluation of water as a resource; its availability, distribution, use, and quality. Operation of the hydrologic cycle and relationships between surface water and the soil, groundwater, and atmosphere. Human impacts on water resources and the management of water-related hazards, including flooding, drought, and the spread of disease. Lecture and field experience.

Walker Ashley (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12/16.

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GEOG 306

 

Severe and Hazardous Weather
GEOG 306: YE1, Class #7662

Examination of fundamentals of atmospheric phenomena with an emphasis on understanding concepts and processes behind severe manifestations of weather and climate. Physical aspects of extratropical cyclones, winter weather phenomena, thunderstorm phenomena, tropical weather systems, and large-scale longer-term weather events are analyzed. Case studies are employed to investigate human, economic, and environmental consequences of extreme weather and climate events.

Catalog Description: Examination of fundamentals of atmospheric phenomena with an emphasis on understanding concepts and processes behind severe manifestations of weather and climate. Physical aspects of extratropical cyclones, winter weather phenomena, thunderstorm phenomena, tropical weather systems, and large-scale, longer-term weather events are analyzed. Case studies are employed to investigate human, economic, and environmental consequences of extreme weather and climate events.

Walker Ashley (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12/16.

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GEOG 330

 

Geography of the U.S. and Canada
GEOG 330: YE1, Class #7663

This course is an introduction to geographic issues in various regions of the United States and Canada. You will be introduced to some major patterns and processes that dominate the major physical and cultural realms of this region. We will first go over some basic physical and social features common to the United States and Canada. We then will explore the historical evolution and unique physical, cultural, and environmental features of fourteen sub-regions, following your textbook. Rather than just describing each region, we will examine the various regions in an attempt to understand and explain regional differences. Ultimately, our exploration of these regions should help us all reach a deeper understanding of the diversity and complexity of life in the United States and Canada. A final project, map quizzes, and exams will all be utilized to increase your knowledge of this diverse and fascinating region.

Catalog Description: Regional analysis of the two countries. Cultural, economic, and political patterns. Geographic perspectives applied to current issues and problems.

Sharon Ashley (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12/16.

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GEOG 455/659

 

Land-Use Planning/Regional Planning
GEOG 455/659: YE1, Class #s 4982/4983 (Regular 16 week)

Catalog Description, GEOG 455: Study of processes and policies in land use and land development decisions.  Mapping and GIS decision-making techniques applied to the analysis of land0use patterns and management conflicts at national, state, regional, and local government scales.  Lecture, laboratory, and field experience.

Catalog Description GEOG 659: Geographic basis and practice of regional mapping, GIS, and spatial decision processes applied to land-use, social services, transportation, and environmental management concerns.  Problems of integrating land, transportation, and environmental management over a multijurisdictional geography.  Lecture and laboratory.

Ryan James (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, YE1, 08/28 - 12/16.

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GEOG 459/559

 

Geographic Information Systems
GEOG 459/559: 00001, Class #s 5692/5696 (Regular 16 week)

Catalog Description, GEOG 459/559: Study of the conceptual framework and development of geographic information systems.  Emphasis on the actual application of a GIS to spatial analysis.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory.  PRQ: GEOG 359 or consent of department.

Philip Young (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, YE1, 08/28 - 12/16.

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GEOG 468/568

 

Workshop in GIS
GEOG 468/568: YE1, Class #s 7266/7267 (Regular 16 week)

Catalog Description, GEOG 368/568: Problems and techniques of GIS prototype development.  Emphasis on GIS development and spatial database management of public sector applications such as land parcel mapping, emergency services, facilities management, and homeland security.  The process of design and production, editing and quality control, and final implementation of an operational product are stressed through applied projects.  PRQ: GEOG 359 and consent of department.

Philip Young (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, YE1, 08/28 - 12/16.

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Internship
ILAS 390

Catalog Description: Work as an intern in an off-campus agency in activities related to one of the majors in the college. Reading and paper preparation under the supervision of a faculty member in the college. May be repeated once. S/U grading. PRQ: Consent of major department and college; junior or senior standing.

Judy Santacaterina (3 credit hours)

  • Contact Judy Santacaterina for information at 815-753-7961 or jsantaca@niu.edu.

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PHIL 101

 

Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 101: 0006, Class #5628

Catalog Description: Investigation of enduring and fundamental questions about ourselves, the world, and our place in the world, such as: What am I? Do I have a mind or soul that is someone separate from my body? How should I live? Do I have free will? Does God exist?  What is knowledge? What is truth? What is beauty?

Carl Gillett (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12-16

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PHIL 105

 

Logic and Critical Reasoning
PHIL 105: 0003, Class #4187

Catalog Description: Introduction to basic principles of rational argument evaluation in everyday life.  Topics include deductive reasoning, the logic of truth functions and categorical statements, informal fallacies, inductive reasoning, causal inference, and the nature of evidence and proof. Emphasis on sharpening students' abilities to evaluate arguments.  Students may not receive credit for both PHIL 103 and PHIL 105.

Staff (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12/16

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PHIL 337

 

Business Ethics
PHIL 337: 0001, Class #4196

Catalog Description: Investigation of moral and ethical issues that arise in the context of business practices, addressing questions such as: To what extent should considerations other than profits determine business decisions?  Who should be held responsible when corporations act immorally or break the law?  What rights and obligations do employees and employers have with respect to one another?  What obligations, if any, do businesses have to their consumers or to the general public?

Staff (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12-16

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PHYS 162

 

Elementary Astronomy
PHYS 162: 0001, Class #3304

Catalog Description: Introduction to astronomical science extending from planetary astronomy through the most recent discoveries and speculations of astrophysics, such as pulsars, "black holes," and the latest hypotheses regarding stellar evolution and cosmology.

David Hedin (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12-16

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POLS 306

 

The Mass Media in American Politics
POLS 306: YE1, Class #7666

Catalog Description: Examination of the influence of the mass media and the elite media on American politics with particular emphasis on how the media relates to other systems of power and authority.  Recommended: At least sophomore standing.

Artemus Ward (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12/16.

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POLS 310

 

The U.S. Supreme Court
POLS 310: YE1, Class #7667

This course will focus on the history, organization, procedures and activities of the United States Supreme Court. Although the Court is at the center of many controversies, most people know relatively little about how it actually operates in the U.S. political and legal systems. The course will examine in depth the nature of Supreme Court appointments, agenda-setting, oral arguments, decision-making, and opinion writing. In addition, we will consider the Court’s relationship to other institutions, including lower courts and the legislative and executive branches. Students will learn how the Court is both a political and legal institution and, more broadly, how law and politics intersect in the U.S. In addition to assigned readings on the Supreme Court, we will follow and discuss (online) current cases before the Court in order to more fully understand how it operates and makes decisions, and the impact its decisions have on law and politics.

Catalog Description: Principles, organization, procedures, and activities of the U.S. Supreme Court. Topics include appointments, public opinion, agenda-setting, oral argument, decision-making, opinion writing, and the Court’s relationship to other institutions including lower courts and the legislative and executive branches. Recommended: At least sophomore standing.

J. Mitch Pickerill (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12/16.

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POLS 375

 

Middle East Politics
POLS 375: YE1, Class #7668

Catalog Description: Comparative examination of selected Middle Eastern states, with emphasis on contemporary political systems, public policies, and foreign relations.  Recommended:  At least sophomore standing.

Mazen Nagi (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12/16

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POLS 390

 

Politics & Popular Music
POLS 390: YE1, Class #7669 

In the United States, there has been a connection between music and politics since the nation’s founding. Politicians, social movements, and the citizenry have routinely expressed political views through music. What messages are these actors sending? Are the messages being received? Is there something unique about music that changes the nature of the message? Music has been used for both pro-establishment and anti-establishment purposes. National anthems, patriotic songs, campaign songs, protest songs, and anti-war songs are just some examples of the ways in which politics and music intersect. Unlike other forms of music, political music is usually not ambiguous, and is therefore relatively easily discerned by listeners. In this course we will explore various types of political music and topical songs over time with an emphasis on contemporary music and how it relates to various social movements and issues particularly those involving race, class, and gender. Through readings, discussion, films, and, of course, music, we will examine how artists such as Billie Holiday, Bob Dylan, John Lennon, Marvin Gaye, Bruce Springsteen, N.W.A., Ani DiFranco, Green Day, and Jay-Z have had their political songs both understood and misunderstood by politicians and citizens alike. We will examine these issues through an historical examination of the development of American popular music from early blackface minstrelsy to blues, jazz, folk, rock, and the current popular music of today: hip-hop.

Catalog Description: Analysis of popular music to explore topics such as protest songs, political campaign songs, benefit concerts, and the connection between musicians and social movements with particular emphasis on issues of race, gender, and class. 

Artemus Ward (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12/16

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PSPA 303X

 

State and Local Government
PSPA 303X: SYE1, Class #7671 

Catalog Description: Crosslisted as POLS 303.  Examines the structure, functions, and governance dynamics of local and state governments.  Includes relationships between local and state government legislative, executive, and administrative actors; management processes; and intergovernmental relations.

Staff (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 10/22

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Public Budgeting
PSPA 412X: SDE1, Class #7716 

Catalog Description: Introduction to the processes and politics of public budgeting, including the legal, political, and economic factors affecting budgeting in federal, state, and local governments in the United States.

James Norris (3 credit hours)

  • Meets at NIU Hoffman Estates on Thursdays from 5 - 10 p.m., 10/23 - 12/16

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PSYC 300

 

Introduction to Brain & Behavior
PSYC 300: YE1, Class #7670

This course explores the biological basis of behavior. The student will first learn about the fundamental elements (neuron and synapse) of the nervous system and their function. The class will build on these basic elements of the nervous system to understand simple (reflexes) and complex (memory) behaviors. The class is structured to follow an online format. Lectures will be captured using blackboard collaborate. Assessments of student learning outcomes will be conducted online via Blackboard using several different formats: short answer questions, multiple choice questions, and a culminating project.

Catalog Description: Introductory survey concerned with the relationship between the brain and a wide variety of behaviors, both normal and abnormal. Provides a fundamental understanding of how the brain controls and mediates behavior, and a foundation for more advanced courses in behavioral neuroscience. PRQ: At least sophomore standing and PSYC 102, or consent of department.

Doug Wallace (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12/16.

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PSYC 315

 

Behavior Disturbances in Children
PSYC 315: 0004, Class #7191

Catalog Description: Disturbances in children involving intellectual, emotional, and expressive behaviors as well as selected therapeutic procedures and their relationship to psychological theories and research.  PRQ: At least sophomore standing and PYSC 102, or consent of department.

Carl Gillett (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12-16


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PSYC 332

 

Personality
PSYC 332: 0003, Class #3391

Catalog Description: Consideration of basic factors in personality and the role of personality in the study of behavior.  Discussion and critical examination of contemporary studies in personality, with emphasis on experimental evidence.  PRQ: At least sophomore standing and PSYC 102, or consent of department.

Joanne Messina (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12-16

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PSYC 372

 

Social Psychology
PSYC 372: 0002, Class #3393

Catalog Description: Behavior in the context of social interaction, with emphasis on experimental findings.  Includes such topics as interpersonal judgment and perception, social attraction, aggression, prejudice and social influence, including attitude formation and persuasion, conformity, and social modeling.  PRQ: At least sophomore standing and PSYC 102, or consent of department.

Joanne Messina (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/28 - 12-16

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STAT 208

 

Basic Statistics
STAT 208: YE1, Class #7717

Catalog Description: Designed to provide students with an understanding of reasoning involved in the statistician's approach to a variety of problems in modern society.  Topics include data collection, descriptive statistics, graphical displays of data, the normal distribution, elementary probability, elements of statistical inference, estimation and hypothesis testing, and linear regression.  Not open for credit toward the major or minor in mathematical sciences.  Not open for credit to students with credit in an upper-division statistics course or in OMIS 324 or UBUS 223.  Not used in major or minor GPA calculation for mathematical sciences majors of minors.

Matthew Grugel (3 credit hours)

  • YE1: Online with 4 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-Rockford, Thursdays, 09/14, 10/12, 11/09, and 12/07, 6:30 - 9 pm.

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STAT 301

 

Elementary Statistics
STAT 301: YE1, Class #7718
STAT 301: YE2, Class #7719

Introduction to basic concepts in statistical methods including probability, theoretical and empirical distributions, estimation, tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation, and single classification analysis of variance procedures.

Please note: This course is not available for credit toward the major in mathematical sciences. This course may not be used in major GPA calculation for mathematical sciences majors.

Catalog Description: Introduction to basic concepts in statistical methods including probability, theoretical and empirical distributions, estimation, tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation, and single classification analysis of variance procedures. Not available for credit toward the major in mathematical sciences. Not used in major GPA calculation for mathematical sciences majors. PRQ: MATH 206 or MATH 210 or MATH 211 or MATH 229.

Claudine Myers (4 credit hours)

  • YE1: Online with 4 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-Hoffman Estates, Saturdays, 09/09, 10/07, 11/11, and 12/09, 9 - 11 a.m.
  • YE2: Online with 4 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-Rockford, Mondays, 09/11, 10/09, 11/13, and 12/05, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

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STAT 350

 

Introduction to Probability and Statistics
STAT 350: YE1, Class #7720

Introduction to the basic ideas and fundamental laws of probability including sample spaces, events, independence, random variables, special probability distributions and elementary statistical inference.

Catalog Description: Introduction to the basic ideas and fundamental laws of probability including sample spaces, events, independence, random variables, special probability distributions and elementary statistical inference. PRQ: MATH 230.

Claudine Myers (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 4 mandatory face-to-face meetings at Kishwaukee Community College, Tuesdays, 09/12, 10/10, 11/14, and 12/12, 6:30 - 8:20 pm.

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