Degrees & Courses

Spring 2017

January 17 - May 13, 2017

Online Courses

REGISTRATION | COSTS | LOCATION | OFF-CAMPUS COURSESONLINE COURSES

Course Descriptions
ANTH | BIOS | ECON | ENGL | FLCL | GEOG | POLS | PSYC | SOCI | STAT | WGST


 

Current Topics in Anthropology:
Native Americans and the Law
ANTH 491: YE1, Class #7362

Explore the rich history, diversity, and thriving traditions of Native American cultures. This course will survey cultures of the native peoples of North America and will discuss key concepts and events in Native American history. We will also examine contemporary issues facing these cultures today, including socioeconomic relationships and matters relating to various US laws and statutes. We will also delve into the changing views of cultural stewardship, museums' role in artifacts and repatriation, and recent events and case studies.

This course will be web-based with 3 face-to-face meetings. It will use a combination of text readings, videos, activities, lectures, and weekly online group discussions. Students will also explore a local museum exhibit that relates to the course and create a report on their experience.

Catalog Description: May be repeated to a maximum of 9 semester hours. PRQ: Consent of department.

Karly Tumminello (3 credit hours)

  • 01/25 - 05/03/17. Online with 3 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-Naperville, Wednesdays, 01/25, 03/08, and 05/03/17, 6:30 - 8:45 pm.

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Evolution and the Creationist Challenge
BIOS 442/542: YE1, Class #s 7363/7364

The perennial culture wars raging in the USA are expressed in many areas of society. One area of attack is the opposition by the Religious Right to the teaching of evolution in public schools. Since before the famous “Scopes Monkey Trial” in 1925, school boards and legislatures have tried to eliminate, add equal doses of creationism to, or water down the coverage of evolution. They have targeted evolution as a cause for many of their perceived “social evils,” don’t understand science, and cannot separate evolution from “Social Darwinism.”

This course will introduce students to the history of the controversy, define the opposition, and explain where each side gets their ideas and what they believe. We will then explore philosophy of science in enough detail to be able to separate a scientific question from a non-scientific question. A preliminary survey of primarily biological evolution will provide students with the necessary information to counter creationist arguments. This course is designed to give students the ability to not only defend evolution but, more importantly, attack non-scientific intrusions into the public school system. It is not a course in biological evolution but complementary, and can be taken by any upper-level undergraduate with an interest in science and society.

Catalog Description: Evolutionary theory and tenets of present-day anti-evolutionists with emphasis on providing students with the skills to articulate the theory of evolution as it applies to the biological sciences. Not a substitute for a formal course in evolutionary theory. Recommended for students pursuing careers in secondary science education.

Ron Toth (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Topics in Modern Economics:
Crime, Education, Immigration, & Poverty
ECON 370: YE1, Class #7365

This course provides an analysis of contemporary macroeconomic and microeconomic issues. Students will explore and analyze topics in modern economics and topics of current importance to the consumers, resource owners, business, and government. Topics of discussions will be current and subject to change with regard to the economy and policies as we proceed through the semester.

Catalog Description: Topics of current importance to consumers, resource owners, business, and government. May be repeated up to 6 hours as topics change. PRG: ECON 260 and ECON 261.

Sowjanya Dharmasankar (3 credit hours)

  • 02/11 - 05/06/17. Online with 2 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-Naperville, Saturdays, 02/11/17, 11 am - 12 pm and 04/01/17, 10 am - 1 pm.

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Economics & Equity
ECON 373 (370C): YE1, Class #7366

This course is a study of economics with a heart, a normative approach. It covers concepts in economics leading to understanding of equity, efficiency, and welfare. Students will be able to understand how different forms of economic activities, policies, and methods of government resource allocations will be affecting the well being of different groups of people and businesses. Income and resource distribution in society, as well as understanding of poverty, discrimination, equity, and efficiency effects of government programs will be explored.

Catalog Description: How different forms of economic activities, policies, and methods of government resource allocations affect the distribution of welfare, income, and resources across and among various groups of people and businesses. Understanding how to measure and analyze the poverty, discrimination, equity, and efficiency effects of government programs. PRQ: ECON 260 and ECON 261.

Sowjanya Dharmasankar (3 credit hours)

  • 02/11 - 05/06/17. Online with 2 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-Naperville, Saturdays, 02/11/17, 12 - 1 pm and 04/08/17, 10 am - 1 pm.

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Technical Writing
ENGL 308: YE1, Class #7367
NO ENGL MAJORS OR MINORS

In this fully online class, students will study the principles and strategies for planning, writing, and revising technical documents common in government, business, and industry. Some of the topics covered in this class are writing effectively, simplifying complex information, writing proposals and reports, and writing instructions (including scripting and producing screencasts).

The class will “meet” in Blackboard Learn where students will find video lectures, video demonstrations, assignment information, and discussion boards. Students will also use Launchpad, an online space provided by the textbook publisher, to access downloadable documents for case studies and other course materials.

Students should purchase Practical Strategies for Technical Communication, 2nd edition, by Mike Markel, with access to Launchpad.

Catalog Description: Principles and strategies for planning, writing, and revising technical documents common in government, business, and industry (e.g., manuals, proposals, procedures, newsletters, brochures, specifications, memoranda, and formal reports). Topics include analysis of audience and purpose, simplifying complex information, document design, and project management.

Janice Knudsen (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Technical Writing
ENGL 308: YE2, Class #7368

Technical Writing explores the theories, principles, and processes of effective communication in professional contexts. Special attention is given to the strategies for composing within technical and professional genres, techniques for analyzing audiences and writing situations, and methods for designing documents and organizing information. In this course, you will learn how to:

  • Analyze audience, purpose, genre conventions, and contexts for your communication, and shape your writing accordingly
  • Write effectively in a variety of genres for professional contexts, including letters, proposals, instructions, and reports
  • Design and organize your writing with usability and readability in mind
  • Reflect on and practice with the use of technology for writing and communication
  • Collaborate with others to improve your writing
  • Develop writing and communication skills required in professional settings.

Catalog Description: Principles and strategies for planning, writing, and revising technical documents common in government, business, and industry (e.g., manuals, proposals, procedures, newsletters, brochures, specifications, memoranda, and formal reports). Topics include analysis of audience and purpose, simplifying complex information, document design, and project management.

Ryan Hibbett (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Technical Writing
ENGL 308: YE3, Class #7369

Technical Writing explores the theories, principles, and processes of effective communication in professional contexts. Special attention is given to the strategies for composing within technical and professional genres, techniques for analyzing audiences and writing situations, and methods for designing documents and organizing information. In this course, you will learn how to:

  • Analyze audience, purpose, genre conventions, and contexts for your communication, and shape your writing accordingly
  • Write effectively in a variety of genres for professional contexts, including letters, proposals, instructions, and reports
  • Design and organize your writing with usability and readability in mind
  • Reflect on and practice with the use of technology for writing and communication
  • Collaborate with others to improve your writing
  • Develop writing and communication skills required in professional settings.

Catalog Description: Principles and strategies for planning, writing, and revising technical documents common in government, business, and industry (e.g., manuals, proposals, procedures, newsletters, brochures, specifications, memoranda, and formal reports). Topics include analysis of audience and purpose, simplifying complex information, document design, and project management.

Ryan Hibbettn (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Classical Mythology
FLCL 271: YE1, Class #7370

This course will offer an interdisciplinary approach to the Greek and Roman myths that have greatly influenced the Western tradition to the present day. While this course does not primarily focus on Greco-Roman history, students will learn a great deal about the ancient Mediterranean: we will consider evidence for the myths from a variety of sources, including primary (historical) texts, material culture, and artistic representations. Even students who enter the course with a basic familiarity with Classical mythology should emerge with a much richer understanding of its underlying symbolic structures, thereby gaining the ability to apply the same critical approaches to other narratives in world literature and to present-day rhetoric. Since the course also introduces students to relatively unfamiliar ancient cultural practices and values, it helps to broaden their horizons and promotes the ability to process (and to communicate about) new information. Student collaboration also fosters the development and exchange of ideas.

Catalog Description: An interdisciplinary approach to Greek and Roman myths, including their historical and contemporary relevance.

Laura Steele (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Maps & Mapping/Fundamentals of Mapping
GEOG 256/556: YE1, Class #s 7371/7379

Though maps have been used by civilizations for well over 5,000 years, practically all aspects of mapping today involve computers – from the collection of real-world data by GPS or satellites, to drafting and printing. Rather than study the history of maps and mapping, we will instead study the concept of maps as tools of modern communication and visualization. This course is also the starting point for NIU’s certificate of undergraduate study in Geographic Information Systems (in addition to applying toward the B.G.S.) and is required for several further courses in geography.

Catalog Description: GEOG 256, Introduction to maps as models of our earth, tools of visualization, and forms of graphic communication. Use of satellite and aerial imagery, land surveying and geographic information systems in map production. Thematic maps and how they are used. Map design for informational and persuasive purposes. Two hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory.
Catalog Description: GEOG 556, For graduate students with little formal background in mapping. Maps as models, tools of visualization, and forms of graphic communication. Processes of map production, including imagery and surveying. Principles of map design.

Autumn James (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Water Resources and the Environment
GEOG 303: YE1, Class # 7372

This course is intended to provide the student with a broader understanding of water and its importance to our lives and earth’s complex environment. We will consider issues facing water such as whether the supply of water will continue, how man-made developments have altered water availability, how pollution has eroded this natural resource, and where/how we can restore our water resources. Relevant video clips, online tutorials, and supplemental readings will be used throughout the course to provide examples of water-related issues affecting northern Illinois, other regions of the U.S., as well as various countries around the world.

Catalog Description: Evaluation of water as a resource; its availability, distribution, use, and quality. Operation of the hydrologic cycle and relationships between surface water and the soil, groundwater, and atmosphere. Human impacts on water resources and the management of water-related hazards, including flooding, drought, and the spread of disease. Lecture and field experience.

Sharon Ashley & Walker Ashley (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Severe and Hazardous Weather
GEOG 306: YE1, Class #7373

This course examines the fundamentals of atmospheric phenomena with an emphasis on understanding concepts and processes behind severe manifestations of weather and climate. Physical and dynamical aspects of extratropical cyclones, winter weather phenomena, thunderstorm phenomena, tropical weather systems, and large-scale, longer-term weather events are analyzed. The course is designed so that you will develop an understanding of the important interactions between the evolution of the sciences of climatology and meteorology, technological advances, and the impacts of extreme weather and climate events. Case studies are employed to investigate human, economic, and environmental consequences of extreme weather and climate events. As a student in today’s technologically rich environment, you will be in a unique position to apply what you have learned immediately to weather events occurring at home, across the country, or around the world.

Catalog Description: Examination of fundamentals of atmospheric phenomena with an emphasis on understanding concepts and processes behind severe manifestations of weather and climate. Physical aspects of extratropical cyclones, winter weather phenomena, thunderstorm phenomena, tropical weather systems, and large-scale, longer-term weather events are analyzed. Case studies are employed to investigate human, economic, and environmental consequences of extreme weather and climate events.

Walker Ashley (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Geography of the U.S. and Canada
GEOG 330: YE1, Class #7374

This course is an introduction to geographic issues in various regions of the United States and Canada. You will be introduced to some major patterns and processes that dominate the major physical and cultural realms of this region. We will first go over some basic physical and social features common to the United States and Canada. We then will explore the historical evolution and unique physical, cultural, and environmental features of fourteen sub-regions, following your textbook. Rather than just describing each region, we will examine the various regions in an attempt to understand and explain regional differences. Ultimately, our exploration of these regions should help us all reach a deeper understanding of the diversity and complexity of life in the United States and Canada. A final project, map quizzes, and exams will all be utilized to increase your knowledge of this diverse and fascinating region.

Catalog Description: Regional analysis of the two countries. Cultural, economic, and political patterns. Geographic perspectives applied to current issues and problems.

Sharon Ashley (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Introduction to Geographic Information
Systems / Fundamentals of GIS
GEOG 359/557: YE1, Class #s 7375/7493

Over time, cartography has evolved from a select group of artisans to mainstream cutting edge mapping. As our world becomes a global area, we must be prepared to better understand our environment through science and software. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful set of tools for analyzing our world and its surroundings. This introductory course familiarizes the students with GIS, both in theory and practice.

Catalog Description: GEOG 359, Study of the fundamental principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Emphasis on the development of these systems, their components and their integration into mainstream geography. Two hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory. PRQ: GEOG 256 or GEOG 352 or consent of department.
Catalog Description: GEOG 557, For graduate students with little formal background in GIS or computer mapping. Principles, components, and uses of geographic information systems. PRQ: GEOG 552 or GEOG 556, or consent of department.

Philip Young (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Soils & Environmental Land Use Planning
GEOG 403/503: YE1, Class #s 7376/7378

Application of soil knowledge to land use and management of agricultural, wildland, and urban landscapes. Use of soil survey information in Geographic Information Systems. Emphasis on soil morphology and interpretation, wetlands, hydric soils, soil erosion and conversation, and human and livestock waste disposal.

Catalog Description: Application of soil science to environmental issues; use of geospatial data in mapping and utilizing the soil resource in agricultural, urban, and natural systems; use of soils information in wetland delineations, waste disposal, nutrient and contaminant cycling, erosion-sedimentation, ecological restoration, and environmental quality. Professional ethics, certification, and licensing of soil scientists.

Michael Konen (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Location Analysis
GEOG 464/564: YE1, Class #s 7377/7380

This course is designed to expose you to three aspects of location analysis in Geography; the theoretical background, analysis of case studies, and location decision exercises. We will begin the course with an outline of the general factors and evaluation of location theory, with the bulk of theory coming from the Industrial Location and Retail Location traditions. Following the introductory unit, we will focus on each of the individual factors of location, understand them though case studies and scholarly analysis, and then apply them to exercise in a GIS environment. By the end of the course, you will have developed the theoretical understanding, analytic, and writing skills to be engage in professional site and location analysis. This course contributes to the Writing Infused Course requirement.

Catalog Description, GEOG 464: Examination of the location patterns of human social and economics activities. Principles of optimal location for agricultural, industrial, retail, transportation, and urban functions. Use of GIS and other spatial methods in location analysis. Lecture and laboratory. PRQ: GEOG 256.
Catalog Description, GEOG 564: Examination of the location patterns of human social and economics activities. Principles of optimal location for agricultural, industrial, retail, transportation, and urban functions. Use of GIS and other spatial methods in location analysis. Lecture and laboratory. PRQ: GEOG 556.

Michael Konen (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Introduction to Law and Courts
POLS 210: YE1, Class #7386

The institutions and actors that make up our legal system are charged with interpreting and applying neutral principles of law. In one sense then, we expect law and courts to rise above politics. However, in another sense, the law and courts are inherently political. Law is a product of politics and political processes. The judiciary is a co-equal branch of government, judges are selected by political means, and court decisions often have broad political and policy implications. Just how political is our legal system, and conversely, how legal is our political system? Can the two even be separated? In this class, we explore some of the most important aspects of U.S. law and its legal system, as well as legal systems in other countries, in an attempt to answer these and other questions. We will try to separate out popular misconceptions from the realities of how our legal system actually works. In the process, this course will emphasize that law is not simply a subject for lawyers and law professors, but it is also an integral part of our political, policy and economic systems with far reaching effects on society.

Catalog Description: Introduction to the study of law and courts, including legal theory, judicial institutions, legal actors, legal systems and ways in which law is interrelated with politics, public policy and society.

Mitch Pickerill (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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The American Presidency
POLS 308: YE1, Class #7388

Having lived through one of the most bizarre presidential elections in history, there is probably no better time to gain an understanding of how it happened, to put it all in the proper context, to see what political scientists say about who wins presidential elections, and why they win. What can we expect to see in the future? This course tries to provide insight into all of these things, and some.

Weekly modules will focus on the history and development of the American presidency and the relationship between the executive branch other branches of government, as well as the media and the public. Additional attention will be given to the study of presidential elections and voting and the performance and evaluation of presidents. Reading and video assignments will aim to reinforce the text by linking material to current issues / news items.

Course materials will include a standard political science text, a multi-part History Channel documentary on the presidency, research and analysis from the Congressional Research Center, editorials and articles from the Nation’s leading newspapers and periodicals, and brief lecture segment videos created by the instructor. While there will be a midterm and a final, the primary path to success in the course will be through steady, timely, efficient performance in the weekly modules.

Catalog Description: Examination of the nature and evolution of the modern presidency and the leadership role of the president in such areas as administration, legislative affairs, and national security. Topics may also include selection, impeachment and presidential reputation. Recommended: At least sophomore standing.

P.S. Ruckman, Jr. (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Law, Politics & Baseball
POLS 314: YE1, Class #7389

Baseball is America’s national pastime. But it is much more than just a game. In this course we will use baseball as a case study of how law and politics function in America. The course is designed for both the baseball novice as well as the expert and we particularly welcome those who are new to the game. Why? Because the course is not really about baseball per se. Instead, we will examine how baseball has been reflective of broader legal and political issues such as gambling and drugs, race and sex discrimination, and business-labor relations and how baseball has come to be the only “business” in America with a constitutional exemption from anti-trust laws. We will explore these and other themes through readings, discussions, and films.

Catalog Description: Analysis of the legal and political aspects of baseball to explore topics such as the relationship between business and government, antitrust law, labor-management relations, and discrimination as it relates to race, gender, and class. (NOTE: POLS 314 used to be taught as one of the topics under POLS 414.)

Art Ward (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Judicial Politics
POLS 317: YE1, Class #7390

The judicial process is filled with myths. These myths are often generated by and reinforced through films, television shows, music, and often fueled popular culture. For example, many see the judicial process as little more than a set of specific procedures, specialized personnel, and institutional arrangements with the goal of adjudicating cases filed in courts. The reality, however, that there are no clear signs to mark the outer edges of the judicial process. Why? Because law is social and political – it is part of our everyday lives. We think that the judicial process ensures just results. Yet, the reality is that the process can and does produce injustices. We will explore why this is as well as many other myths and realities relating to law, law school, the legal profession, attorneys, courts, judges, and other actors involved in the process.

Catalog Description: Organization and operation of trial and appellate courts, selection of judges, varieties of litigation, factors influencing judicial decision-making, and impact of and compliance with judicial decisions. Recommended: At least sophomore standing.

Art Ward (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Introduction to Brain & Behavior
PSYC 300: YE1, Class #7391

This course explores the biological basis of behavior. The student will first learn about the fundamental elements (neuron and synapse) of the nervous system and their function. The class will build on these basic elements of the nervous system to understand simple (reflexes) and complex (memory) behaviors. The class is structured to follow an online format. Lectures will be captured using blackboard collaborate. Assessments of student learning outcomes will be conducted online via blackboard using several different formats: short answer questions, multiple choice questions, and a culminating project.

Catalog Description: Introductory survey concerned with the relationship between the brain and a wide variety of behaviors, both normal and abnormal. Provides a fundamental understanding of how the brain controls and mediates behavior, and a foundation for more advanced courses in behavioral neuroscience. PRQ: At least sophomore standing and PSYC 102, or consent of department.

Doug Wallace (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Behavior Disturbances in Children
PSYC 315: YE1, Class #7392
Winter Intersession

This course will focus on the etiology, classification, diagnosis, and treatment of childhood disorders. Emphasizing the developmental aspects of child psychopathology, how children’s and adolescents’ psychological disorders are distinguishable from those of adults will be examined. Particular attention will also be devoted to understanding how the mental health, education, health care, and juvenile justice systems provide services to children and adolescents with psychological disorders.

Catalog Description: Disturbances in children involving intellectual, emotional, and expressive behaviors as well as selected therapeutic procedures and their relationship to psychological theories and research. PRQ: At least sophomore standing and PSYC 102, or consent of department.

Phil Krasula (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 12/19/16 - 01/13/17.

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Developmental Child Psychology
PSYC 324: YE1, Class #7393

This course offers an advanced introduction to the study of child development from infancy to adolescence. The aim of the course is to familiarize the student with the methods, concepts, and issues of interest in the scientific study of child development. This course will include basic concepts and theories of child development as these apply to the psychological processes of perception, cognition, social interactions, affective, and moral development.

Catalog Description: Introduction to questions, approaches, and empirical findings in the field of developmental psychology. Emphasis on the processes of psychological development during childhood, as illustrated within a broad range of psychological content domains. PRQ: At least sophomore standing and PSYC 102, or consent of department.

Michelle Demaray (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Personality
PSYC 332: YE1, Class #7394

This course will examine various renowned theorists who have made major contributions to the field of psychology. The approach for this course will be to offer historical perspectives on personality and to enchance student critical thinking to build a solid framwork for understanding “personality.” Class sessions will include lecture; films; discussions and activities.

Catalog Description: Consideration of basic factors in personality and the role of personality in the study of behavior. Discussion and critical examination of contemporary studies in personality, with emphasis on experimental evidence. PRQ: At least sophomore standing and PSYC 102, or consent of department.

Joanne Messina (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Social Problems
SOCI 270: YE1, Class #7395

This course addresses some of the most compelling social problems in society and discusses the diverse contributions sociology has made to the understanding of complex social issues. By investigating topics such as physical & mental health, crime & social control, poverty & economic inequality (just to name a few!), you will be able to identify cause-effect patterns, display a critical understanding of how social problems are shaped by both historical and current societal patterns and use your sociological imagination to critically evaluate strategies for action in alleviating problems facing society today. Using videos, interactive discussions and your own life experiences, you will engage in social learning and explore how YOU are connected to all social phenomena.

Catalog Description: Why social problems occur and how society can work toward correcting them. Exploration of how different value premises and social theories lead to distinctive ways of addressing social problems. Issues such as poverty, crime, homelessness, intergroup conflicts, and sexual identity discrimination provide case materials for these explorations. Use of this approach to examine underlying structural problems such as economic restructuring, the overall health and aging of the population, and urban change and decline.

Kristie Crane (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/17 - 05/12/17.

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Elementary Statistics
STAT 301: YE1, Class #7397

Introduction to basic concepts in statistical methods including probability, theoretical and empirical distributions, estimation, tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation, and single classification analysis of variance procedures.

Please note: This course is not available for credit toward the major in mathematical sciences. This course may not be used in major GPA calculation for mathematical sciences majors.

Catalog Description: Introduction to basic concepts in statistical methods including probability, theoretical and empirical distributions, estimation, tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation, and single classification analysis of variance procedures. Not available for credit toward the major in mathematical sciences. Not used in major GPA calculation for mathematical sciences majors. PRQ: MATH 206 or MATH 210 or MATH 211 or MATH 229.

Claudine Myers (3 credit hours)

  • 01/23 - 05/08/17. Online with 4 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-Rockford, Mondays, 01/23, 02/20, 04/17, 05/08/17, 6:30 - 8:30 pm.

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Elementary Statistics
STAT 301: YE2, Class #7398

Introduction to basic concepts in statistical methods including probability, theoretical and empirical distributions, estimation, tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation, and single classification analysis of variance procedures.

Please note: This course is not available for credit toward the major in mathematical sciences. This course may not be used in major GPA calculation for mathematical sciences majors.

Catalog Description: Introduction to basic concepts in statistical methods including probability, theoretical and empirical distributions, estimation, tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation, and single classification analysis of variance procedures. Not available for credit toward the major in mathematical sciences. Not used in major GPA calculation for mathematical sciences majors. PRQ: MATH 206 or MATH 210 or MATH 211 or MATH 229.

Claudine Myers (3 credit hours)

  • 01/21 - 05/06/17. Online with 4 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-Hoffman Estates, Saturdays, 01/21, 02/18, 04/15, 05/06/17, 9 - 11 am.

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Introduction to Probability & Statistics
STAT 350: YE1, Class #7399

Introduction to the basic ideas and fundamental laws of probability including sample spaces, events, independence, random variables, special probability distributions and elementary statistical inference.

Catalog Description: Introduction to the basic ideas and fundamental laws of probability including sample spaces, events, independence, random variables, special probability distributions and elementary statistical inference. PRQ: MATH 230.

Claudine Myers (3 credit hours)

  • 01/24 - 05/09/17. Online with 4 mandatory face-to-face meetings at Kishwaukee Community College, Tuesdays, 01/24, 02/21, 04/18, and 05/09/17, 6:30 - 8:30 pm.

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Special Topics in Women's & Gender Studies:
Mystifying Trickery: Representations of
Magic, Witchcraft, & Gender
WGST 430: YE1, Class #7400
Winter Intersession

What can Bewitched, Sabrina, Charmed, Hocus Pocus, Harry Potter, and the W.I.T.C.H. series of graphic novels for children tell us about ourselves and our cultural representations of race, class, gender, ability, and sexuality? How does the history of witch trials charge our modern representations? After briefly exploring the socio-cultural role played by the witchcraft prosecutions in early-modern Europe and the Colonial United States, this course will examine the evolving representations of the race, class, gender, ability, and sexuality implications of witches and magic in a variety of media including fiction (both graphic and traditional), television, and movies (both documentary and fictional). In addition to online participation and reading notes, students will write one short essay and a research paper.

Catalog Description: May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours as topic changes. PRQ: Junior or senior standing or consent of director.

Lise Schlosser (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 12/19/16 - 01/13/17.

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