Team of NIU scientists discovers simple, green method of producing highly touted graphene

Amartya Chakrabarti holds up a sample of graphene produced via the dry-ice methodConversion of carbon dioxide to few-layer graphene
J. Mater. Chem., 2011, 21, 9491

In a June communication to the Journal of Materials Chemistry, the NIU researchers report on a new method that converts carbon dioxide directly into few-layer graphene (less than 10 atoms in thickness) by burning pure magnesium metal in dry ice.

“It is scientifically proven that burning magnesium metal in carbon dioxide produces carbon, but the formation of this carbon with few-layer graphene as the major product has neither been identified nor proven as such until our current report,” said Narayan Hosmane, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry who leads the NIU research group.

“It’s a very simple technique that’s been done by scientists before,” added Amartya Chakrabarti, first author of the communication to the Journal of Materials Chemistry and an NIU post-doctoral research associate in chemistry and biochemistry. “But nobody actually closely examined the structure of the carbon that had been produced.”

See the full NIU Today article posted on June 20, 2011. (Above photo, Amartya Chakrabarti holds up a sample of graphene produced via the dry-ice method.)


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