2007

NIU Burma Art Collection Showcases

1/07 to 5/07
Northern Illinois University
School of Art, Arends Building
DeKalb IL

This is a hallway exhibition in the School of Art. In this exhibition we included art objects for the NIU Burma Art Collection. We had three different exhibits over two semesters. These included "Buddhist Narratives in Burmese Lacquerware," "Modern Burmese Paintings" and "Bamboo."

Supported by:
The NIU Center for Burma Studies


2006

From Heaven to Earth: A Ritual to the 37 Nats

9/21/06 to 12/16/06
Northern Illinois University
Art Museum, Altgeld Hall
DeKalb IL

This exhibition reproduced a temporary altar and explored it from various angles of common Buddhist practice in Burma which is part of the living Culture. It offers another type of initiation of the complexity of Burmese Buddhism via its art still practice today.

Supported by:
Illinois Art Council, Friends of the NIU Art Museum, and the NIU Arts Fund 21.

NIU Burma Art Collection Showcases

1/06 to 5/06
Northern Illinois University
School of Art, Arends Building
DeKalb IL

This is a hallway exhibition in the School of Art. In this exhibition we included art objects for the NIU Burma Art Collection. We had four different exhibits over the two semesters. These included Asian Metal Workshop Conservation, Variations on Burmese Calligraphy, Burma “Art in Context”, and The Burmese Harp as
an art object.

Supported by:
The NIU Center for Burma Studies


2005

The Art of Burma

9/9/05 to 10/29/05
NIU Chicago Art Gallery
Chicago IL

Selections from the vast collections of Denison University in Ohio and the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University featuring sculpture and tapestries dating from the eleventh through nineteenth centuries which explore Burmese Buddhism, its practice, transmission, donors and protectors, and the nature of collecting cultural art and artifacts in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Supported by: Sally Stevens Fund for Excellence in the Arts, Illinois Art Council, Friends of NIU Art Museum, The Arts Fund 21, The Burke Gallery of Denison University and Denison Club of Chicago, Chicago Tribune Review.

2004

The World of Burmese Buddhism

10/23/04 to 5/14/05
Kaba Saun Natz (LOKANAT)
Northern Illinois University
Art Museum, Altgeld Hall
DeKalb IL

Exhibition examines the diversity and complexity of Burmese Buddhism through artworks made both for the palace and monastery environment and dating from the seventh through the nineteenth century.

Catherine Raymond, Director of the Center for Burma Studies and Curator, presented several different lectures which included: "Donors and Protectors," "Treasures from the Court of Mandalay," "Burmese Buddha Images" and "Treasures from Manuscript to Tapestry."

Supported by: Illinois Art Council and Friends of the NIU Art Museum.

Envisioning Burma

10/04 to 12/04
Northern Illinois University
Founders Memorial Library
DeKalb IL

This exhibit highlighted the rare book and special collection on Burma such as manuscripts from the 18th Century, maps from 16th Century and rare books on Burma from the 18th century. All of these items are from the Burma Collection. They are maintained within the Rare Book and Special Collection (RBSC) as well as within the Southeast Asia Collection of the (FML) (the exhibit was done in cooperation with the NIU FML staff such as the Curator of the Southeast Asia Collection, the Curator of the RBSC with the assistance of the Dean and the assistant Dean of the FML).


2003

Toys in Burma

4/03 to 10/03
Northern Illinois University
Anthropology Museum, Stevens Building
DeKalb IL

There were three cases displaying Burmese puppets. Three lectures on Southeast Asian Puppets were presented. Kathy Foley presented the paper "Burmese Marionettes: Yokthe Thay in Transition."

Supported by: NIU Center for Burma Studies and the NIU Anthropology Museum.

University Collects

01/13/03 to 01/31/03
Northern Illinois University
Jack Arends Gallery, Arends Building
DeKalb IL

The Center had a display showing the most beautiful art pieces of our collection.

Supported by: NIU Center for Burma Studies and the NIU Art Museum.