Spring 2018 Courses

Spring 2018

Course list - ***All courses are subject to change***

ANTH 102 Rise of Civilization - 
Lecture MW - 10:00 - 10:50am Room: DU 204
Lab Sections - All in SS 175
M- 12:00 - 12:50pm, F 10:00 - 10:50am, F 11:00 - 11:50am, W 3:30 - 4:20pm
Presentation and discussions on key human material developments since our earliest evolutionary ancestors until the emergence of early civilizations in the Near East, Mediterranean, East Asia, Mesoamerica, and South America. Lab sections will review archaeological methods used to recover and analyze ancient artifacts, technological innovations, and social organization. PLEASE BE ADVISED, because this course is a part of the Course Transformation initiative, it requires good attendance in lecture, participation in laboratory, and completion of online assignments. 
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Heather Walder

ANTH 103 - The Great Apes, Our Closest Relatives
Section 1 (MW 2:00pm - 3:15pm) Room: DU 148                                          
This course fits within the General Education Domain of Nature and Technology.  It will offer an in-depth look at the Great Apes (chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans) from the perspective of biological anthropology.  We will briefly review the anatomy, evolution and taxonomy of the Great Apes, and more extensively cover their social organization, feeding ecology, evidence of culture and tool use, language skills, and conservation status.  In addition, we will consider how apes should be treated both in captivity and the wild.  Videos, class lectures, group projects and in-class labs.
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Leila Porter

ANTH 120 Anthropology and Human Diversity                                      
Section 1 (TTh 12:30 - 1:45pm DU 246)
Anthropology 120 is an introduction to the field of anthropological study. This course provides a basic understanding to the four main fields in anthropology 좩 archaeology, physical, social-cultural, and linguistic anthropology. This comprehensive overview will examine Human Diversity through the lens of the way that the four subfields relate to each other in anthropology�s study of humans as both biological and socio-cultural beings. The course will provide students with a general introduction to main theories, approaches, concepts and key issues in anthropology. Topics explored in the course include biological and cultural evolution, culture and production, social organization and political organization, social inequalities, symbolic systems, language and culture change. The lectures are supplemented by audio-visual materials and readings covering a wide range of issues and topics in Anthropology. Various themes and topics addressed in this course will highlight the mutual and dynamic interrelationships that exist between science, society and culture. Science does not and cannot exist in a vacuum independent of the society and culture within which it develops. Conversely, science and technology inexorably modify a people�s perception of reality. It is imperative that citizens understand the dynamics of this relationship if they are to be socially responsible decision-making members of a multicultural, technologically sophisticated society.
INSTRUCTOR:  Professor Andrea Molnar

ANTH 210 Exploring Archaeology
Section 1 (TTH 11:00 - 12:15pm DU 246)
This course presents the scientific, anthropological approach to archaeology by emphasizing the methods and concepts used by archaeologists to interpret the remains of past cultures. We will examine evidence from archaeological sites and civilizations from around the globe to learn what archaeologists look for, how they look for it, what they find, and how they interpret it. 
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Kurt Rademaker

ANTH 210-H2 Exploring Archaeology
Section Honors 2 (MWF 10:00am-10:50am DU 228)
This course presents the scientific, anthropological approach to archaeology by emphasizing the methods and concepts used by archaeologists to interpret the ancient civilizations that they find. Examples include archaeological sites and civilizations from around the globe. Learn what archaeologists look for, how they look for it, what they find, and how they interpret it.
PRQ: Must be an University Honors Student
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Kerry Sagebiel

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ANTH 220 General Cultural Anthropology
Section 1 (MW 2:00 - 3:15pm DU 422)
What is culture and how does it impact human behavior and human explanations of behavior?  By learning how anthropologists study diverse societies using the culture concept, students will come to understand their own culture better.  How is cultural relativism able to be applied to diverse contemporary societies to ease conflicts caused by ethnocentrism and stereotyping?   How does language structure our thought and guide behavior?  How do people use cultural knowledge to interpret their own behavior and that of others?  By studying ethnographic methods and comparing studies of different cultures, the student will better appreciate cultural diversity while identifying commonalities shared among all cultures. Culturally constructed categories of race, ethnicity, gender, and class are explored along with ecological, interpretative, and critical theories of human behavior. Class format includes lecture/discussion, readings, and Interactive learning through problem solving in the classroom. Students will conduct a mini-ethnography and complete exercises exploring cultural constructions of meaning. 
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Kristen Borre

ANTH 240   Becoming Human:  Discovering Human Origins
Section 1 (TTH 2:00 - 3:15pm Room DU 340)
This course is an introductory class for biological anthropology that fits within the General Education Domain of Nature and Technology.  The course provides an overview of the evolution of modern humans. The first third of this class is devoted to evolutionary history, basic biology, and human variation.  The second part concerns living primates. The last section discusses the human fossil record with an emphasis on the morphological and behavioral adaptations across human evolutionary history.  It has three laboratory exercises.  DVDs, handouts, and class lectures/discussions.
INSTRUCTOR:  Professor Daniel Gebo   

ANTH 240 - H2   Becoming Human:  Discovering Human Origins
Section H2 (MW 3:30pm - 4:45pm CO B55)  
This course is an introductory class for biological anthropology that fits within the General Education Domain of Nature and Technology.  The course provides an overview of the evolution of modern humans. The first third of this class is devoted to evolutionary history, basic biology, and human variation.  The second part concerns living primates. The last section discusses the human fossil record with an emphasis on the morphological and behavioral adaptations across human evolutionary history.  It has in-class laboratory exercises, DVDs, class lectures and discussions.
PRQ: Must be an University Honors Student
INSTRUCTOR:  Professor Leila Porter 

ANTH 301 American Culture 
Online W 4 Face to Face Meetings: Jan 23; Feb 6; Mar 20; Apr 24
Section 1 (T 6:00 - 8:00pm
DU 254)
 
Has our culture become a disaster? What does it mean to �know how to live?� We will address how American worldview and popular culture shapes our health, work, consumption, and social behaviors. Is there a common set of values and beliefs that creat a unique American Culture even though we have multi-cultural roots? We will examine what it means to be multicultural nation using food as a medium. Anthropological concepts and theories will guide our exploration of American beliefs and behviors; of what equality means when Americans talk about and express ethnicity, class, gender, and race. Readings, videos, short assignments/discussions, quizzes and a research paper are required.
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Kristen Borre

ANTH 328/790   Anthropology of Religion                                              
Section 1 (MW 2:00 - 3:15pm RH 205)
The course examines anthropological approaches to the study and analysis of belief systems, rituals, cosmology and myths from a cross-cultural perspective and also considers how these relate to other aspects of cultural systems, including politics and culture change.  The course addresses description and analysis of a variety of religious systems and theoretical and methodological approaches in the anthropology of religion.  PRQ: ANTH 220 or consent of instructor.
INSTRUCTOR:  Professor Andrea Molnar

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ANTH 331 Language and Culture      
Section 1 (TTH 9:30 - 10:45am RH 205)                                                             
Studies in language and culture center on the dual question of what, if any, effect one�s language has on one�s cognition or perception (linguistic relativity), and the effectiveness of extending linguistic models to the analysis of culture. First, we look at how contemporary linguistic theories and methodologies (conversation analysis and constructivism) are used for the investigation of cultural systems. We read about cross-cultural conversational styles and one enlightening Polynesian ethnography. Second, we discuss the historical roots of linguistic relativity and then analyze in detail the state of the current debate. Third, the role of language ideology in generating linguistic change and political marginality are dealt with by an in-depth reading of an Indonesian ethnographic work.   PRQ: ANTH 230 or consent of instructor.
INSTRUCTOR:  Professor Giovanni Bennardo

ANTH 341/BIOS 341x Primatology
Section 1 (TTH 11:00 - 12:15pm CO B55)
This class explores the biology of non-human primates, our closest relatives. In addition to surveying the major living groups (lemurs, lorises, galagos, tarsiers, monkeys and apes) we will examine primate anatomy (locomotor, feeding and sensory adaptations), ecology (diet, predation, community structure) and behavior (group living, social structure, vocal communication, culture). Finally, we will trace the evolution of key primate groups in the fossil record. Lectures, hands-on labs and discussions. PRQ: ANTH 240 or consent of instructor.
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Mitchell Irwin

ANTH 414/514 Archaeology of Mesoamerica                    
Section 1 (TTH 2:00pm - 3:15pm RH 205)                       
A survey of the cultures of prehistoric Mesoamerica who occupied an area from the American Southwest to Nicaragua in Central America. Prehistory will be covered from the earliest Paleoindian occupations to the complex societies of the Olmec, Maya, Toltec, and Aztec. Topics will include agriculture, art, architecture, writing, warfare, religion, rulership, the lives of common people, and the processes of growth and collapse of the complex societies. PRQ: ANTH 210 or consent of department.
INSTRUCTOR:  Professor Kerry Sagebiel

ANTH 435/535 Space in Language and Culture              
Section 1 (TTH 11:00 - 12:15pm RH 205)                        
Cross listed as GEOG 435X.  Exploration of how various languages express spatial relationships by using different parts of speech, how culture shapes ways of organizing and using space in daily and ritual behavior, and the mental organization of spatial knowledge, with emphasis on universal patterns that generate cultural and individual realizations.  PRQ:  ANTH 230 or consent of department.
INSTRUCTOR:  Giovanni Bennardo

ANTH 445/545 Primate Evolution                                    
Section 1 (TTH 9:30am - 10:45am CO B55)
This course is devoted to understanding the fossil record of primates.  Fossil primates will be studied in terms of their environmental adaptations and for their evolutionary relationships.  Classes are a mixture of lectures, labs, and discussions, with an emphasis on phylogeny.  PRQ:  ANTH 240 or consent of instructor.
INSTRUCTOR:  Professor Daniel Gebo 

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ANTH 449/549 Primates and Food
Section 1 (TTH 12:30 - 1:45pm CO B55)
This course provides a broad overview of primate nutritional ecology, examining both sides of an evolutionary process: how primate adaptations improve success in acquiring nutrients, and how plant adaptations discourage or encourage herbivory. The first unit examines the chemical properties of food, focusing on macronutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrates), macronutrients (vitamins and minerals), and plant secondary metabolites (compounds designed to discourage herbivory). The second unit explores primates� anatomical and physiological adaptations to their food, such as gut size and function, as well as behavioral adaptations such as ranging and grouping patterns. Finally, we critically examine primate nutritional ecology methodologies, and consider whether these methods and theory are useful in understanding human dietary choices and adaptations.
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Mitchell Irwin

ANTH 461/561 Methods in Archaeology 
Section 1 (MW 2:00pm - 3:15pm Room TBA)        
Introduction to the methods of field work, mapping, stratigraphy, typology, GIS, GPS, remote sensing, dating, and analyzing various types of artifacts. Emphasis on selecting techniques for analysis and interpreting analytical results. PRQ: ANTH 210 or consent of department.
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Heather Walder

ANTH 465/565 Medical Anthropology
Section 1 (MWF 11:00 - 11:50am CO B55)
Health, wellbeing, and health care comprise key issues among societies at the local, national and global levels. This course draws on methodological and analytical approaches from anthropology to understand disease, injury, sickness, health related behaviors and perceptions, and therapeutic processes. Students will explore selected current human health topics such as bio-cultural, applied, and critical medical anthropological approaches to evolutionary medicine and chronic disease; culture and health; health care policy; mental health; alcohol and drug use; food and nutrition; and gender and reproduction. Liberal arts, allied health, public health, nursing, and pre-med students are encouraged to enroll as well as anthropology majors. Lecture/discussion format with application of shared problem solving will be practiced. A research paper of the student's choice is required. 
INSTRUCTOR Professor Kristen Borre

ANTH 467/567 Applied Anthropology      
Section 1 (MWF 10:00 - 10:50am RH 205)
This course utilizes an applied anthropological framework to understand and address challenges of human adaptation.  It is designed to provide students with conceptual, ethical, methodological, and practical anthropological tools to recognize, understand, and address fundamental problems of contemporary human adaptation.  Grades are based upon two written examinations (66% of grade) and an applied research project to include an in-class presentation (33% of grade).
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Kendall Thu   

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ANTH 469/569 The Archaeology of Empires  
Section 1 (TTH 3:30 - 4:45pm RH 205)                             
An archaeological perspective on the formation, character, and fall of ancient empires, including militarism, urbanism, state ideology, provincial life, infrastructure, social and ethnic relations, economic interactions, and collapse. The course is comparative, drawing from both Old World and New World empires. PRQ: ANTH 210 or consent of instructor.
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Kerry Sagebiel

ANTH 491/591: Current Topics in Anthropology: Resource Conflicts and Environmental Peacebuilding|
Section 1 (MW 3:30 - 4:45pm RH 205)
Interdisciplinary examination of resource conflict and environmental peacebuilding through case studies around the world. Investigates how different material, geographical, and sociopolitical factors exacerbate conflicts and provide opportunities for peacebuilding. Course materials include ethnographic books, scholarly articles, news reports, and films.
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Emily McKee

ANTH 491/591 Current Topics in Anthropology: Settlement of the Americas
Section 2 (MW 3:30 - 4:45pm CO B55)
This course will introduce students to the archaeology of the initial human settlement of the western hemisphere. The settlement of the Americas represents the most recent, rapid, and geographically extensive biogeographic expansion of our species. Understanding the timing, process, adaptations, and environmental changes involved in this expansion is important not only for understanding American prehistory but also for comparing with other expansions of our species that happened earlier, elsewhere in the world. Major themes include: Chronology and migration routes of early settlement, important archaeological sites in North, Central, and South America, environmental and landscape change, human impacts on environments, theory of human biogeography (migration and colonization), and cutting-edge methods that are accelerating the pace of discoveries.
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Kurt Rademaker

ANTH 491/591 Current Topics in Anthropology: Archaeology of Culture Contact and Colonialism
Section 3 (W 6:00 - 8:40pm RH 205)
Explore the diverse processes and results of interaction among past cultures, examined both through global examples (Uruk, ancient Egypt, India, and the Classical world) and a particular focus on interactions among Europeans and Native Americans.  Emphasis will be on outcomes and aftermath of colonial encounters, including ethnogenesis, hybridity, diaspora, and decolonization.  Appreciate the archaeology of human interaction as a key to understanding processes of globalization and interaction in the modern world, as applicable in private industry and scholarly contexts.
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Heather Walder 

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ANTH 498-1/ANTH 690 Independent Study in Anthropology:  Library Research in Anthropology -
1 Credit Hour (8 week course)  W  8:30am  (FO 237)                       
This topics class, designed for all majors and graduate students, will be a seven-week exploration of the paper and electronic resources available in sub disciplines of anthropology, emphasizing hands-on practice as well as gaining skill in searching for relevant materials.  The extensive holdings of Founders Library relating to archaeology, physical anthropology, linguistics and cultural anthropology will be utilized to equip students with familiarity with possible research tools as well as training them in how to think about doing literature searches so much a part of our field.  Evaluation will be done via weekly worksheets and a take-home final.  No prerequisites. See April in Grant Tower South Room 502 for enrollment.                                         
INSTRUCTOR:  R. B. Ridinger

ANTH 665 Museum Practicum   
Work experience in an on-campus (NIU) museum, gallery or collection. With permission it may be another institution that contains related cultural or aesthetic objects and artifacts as long as the work is under the supervision of a member of a professional staff. Requires regular experience in day-to-day museum operations and completion of a major project arranged with the intern�s museum supervisor/museum studies faculty member. Minimum practicum time is 120 clock hours. PRQ: Completion of ART 565 or equivalent and one museum studies core course. INSTRUCTOR: Staff

ANTH 693: Museum Internship:                                                                          
Work experience at an off-campus museum gallery under the supervision of a member of the professional museum staff. Requires regular experience in day-to-day museum operations and completion of a major project arranged with the intern�s museum supervisor and the NIU Museum Studies representative. May be repeated to a maximum of 2 credit hours. PRQ: ART 565 or equivalent plus the museum studies core courses. INSTRUCTOR: Staff

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ANTH 490 - Anthropological Research Training:    PRQ: Consent of Department Required
A - Cultural Anthropology                 B - Ethnology             C - Archaeology
D - Physical Anthropology                 E - Ethnohistory          J - Linguistics

ANTH 493 Anthropology Field Study:                       PRQ: Consent of Department Required          
A - Cultural Anthropology                 B - Ethnology             C - Archaeology
D - Physical Anthropology                 E - Ethnohistory          J - Linguistics

ANTH 498 Independent Study in Anthropology        PRQ: Consent of Department Required.  

ANTH 498H Independent Study in Anthropology     PRQ: Consent of Department Required.

ANTH 590 Anthropological Research Training   PRQ: Consent of Department Required.
A - Cultural Anthropology                 B - Ethnology             C - Archaeology
D - Physical Anthropology                 E - Ethnohistory          J - Linguistics

ANTH 593-A Anthropology Field Study:               PRQ: Consent of Department Required.
A - Cultural Anthropology                 B - Ethnology             C - Archaeology
D - Physical Anthropology                 E - Ethnohistory          J - Linguistics

ANTH 690: Independent Study                              PRQ: Consent of Department Required.                   
A - Cultural Anthropology                 B - Ethnology             C - Archaeology

D - Physical Anthropology                 E - Ethnohistory          J - Linguistics

ANTH 699   Master's Thesis                                  PRQ: Consent of Department Required