Degrees & Courses

Spring 2012

Regular Session
January 17 - May 10, 2012

Off-Campus Courses
&
Online Courses

REGISTRATION | COSTS | LOCATION | OFF-CAMPUS COURSES | ONLINE COURSES

Course Descriptions
ANTH | BIOS | COMS | ECON | GEOG | HIST | ILAS | POLS | PSYC | SOCI | WOMS

Additional CLAS Off-Campus Offerings
ENGL | ENVS | POLS | PSPA | SOCI

 


PLEASE CALL 815-753-5200 for permit course information. Course details may change. For the most up-to-date information, please see our online listings: www.niu.edu/clasep/courses/bgs/index.shtml

ATTENTION BGS STUDENTS: You will apply for graduation during the semester in which you register for your final term. You should meet with your adviser to determine that you are registering for the correct courses. You and your adviser must be certain that your file in Registration and Records is complete and accurate with all documents (transcripts, grade changes, substitutions, adviser approval letters) and information necessary for graduation. Please carefully review your Academic Advising Report for accuracy. It is your responsibility to contact your adviser with any questions regarding descrepancies that appear on this report. You may review your Academic Advising Report through MyNIU

The deadlines for applying for spring 2012 graduation is December 1, 2011. You must have at least 90 total semester hours to apply for graduation. The $29.00 graduation fee will be billed to your student account. Absolutely no late applications will be accepted.

Course titled with a computer means that the class is offered online.

 

ANTH 303 Spring 2012 CourseIndians of North America
ANTH 303: YE1, Class #7890

This course will describe and analyze the cultures of native peoples of North America. The diversity of social, economic, religioius life, languages, and arts of representative Indian groups from the various geographic regions will be covered. Established pre-Columbian patterns, experiences with European colonization, culture change, and 20th century reconfigurations will be discussed. This course will be web-based with 3 face-to-face meetings and will use a combination of online topic modules, text readings, formal lecture, topical videos, in-class "hands-on" small group and whole class exercises, and ongoing discussion.

Catalog Description: Description and analysis of the cultures of native peoples of North America. Social, economic, and religious life; languages and arts of representative North American Indian groups.

Judith Calleja (3 credit hours)  

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at Waubonses Community College in the Academic and Professional Center (APC) 170, Thursdays, 02/02, 03/22 and 05/10, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.  

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BIOS 442/542 Spring 2012 CourseEvolution and the Creationist Challenge
BIOS 442/542

The perennial culture wars raging in the USA are expressed in many areas of society. One area of attack is the opposition by the Religious Right to the teaching of evolution in public schools. Since before the famous "Scopes Monkey Trial" in 1925, school boards and legislatures have tried to eliminate, add equal doses of creationism to, or water down the coverage of evolution. They have targeted evolution as a cause for many of their perceived "social evils," don't understand science, and cannot separate evolution from "Social Darwinism."

This course will introduce students to the history of the controversy, define the opposition, explain where each side gets their ideas, and what they believe. We will then explore philosophy of science in enough detail to be able to separate a scientific question from a non-scientific question. A preliminary survey of primarily biological evolution will provide students with the necessary information to counter creationist arguments. This course is designed to give students the ability to not only defend evolution but, more importantly, attack non-scientific intrusions into the public school system. It is not a course in biological evolution but complementary, and can be taken by any upper-level undergraduate with an interest in science and society.

Catalog Description: Evolutionary theory and tenets of present-day anti-evolutionists with emphasis on providing students with the skills to articulate the theory of evolution as it applies to the biological sciences. Not designed as a substitute for a formal course in evolutionary theory. Recommended for students pursuing careers in secondary science education.

Ronald Toth (3 credit hours)  

  • Fully online course, 01/30 - 05/07. No face-to-face meetings. Students should consult orientation videos posted in the course content.  

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Business and Professional Communication
COMS 361: DE1, Class #7877

This class will focus on interviewing from both the interviewer and interviewee standpoint, working together as teams, and preparing written documents for the workplace. We will also evaluate culture and its impact on the global workforce, as well as, acceptable and unacceptable forms of behavior for cultures worldwide.

Catalog Description: Development of communication skills commonly used in governmental, corporate, and nonprofit agencies. Emphasis on report generation, information interviewing, and the presentation of proposals. Because a significant portion of the course grade is based on student team projects. PRQ: COMS 100.  

Jennifer Likeum (3 credit hours)

  • NIU-Hoffman Estates in Room 105, Wednesdays, 02/01 - 05/09, 6:30 - 9:15 p.m.

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Corporate Advocacy and Issue Management
COMS 380: QE1, Class #8125

This course focuses on how corporations are using new forms of social media (including Facebook, Youtube, and Twitter) for their promotional campaigns. Readings will cover issues related to consumerism, target marketing, and digital branding. Students will maintain a blog throughout the semester in which they will apply some of the practices addressed in the course. In addition, there will be three take-home exams over the course readings and lectures.

Catalog Description: Objectives, development, and implementation of campaigns of public information, image, and advocacy by corporations. Emphasis on corporate image creation, public issue debate, and corporate advocacy advertising.  

Robert Brookey (3 credit hours)  

  • NIU-Rockford in Room 202, Tuesdays, 01/31 - 05/08, 6:30 – 9:15 pm.  

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ECON 370B Spring 2012 CourseIncome Distribution and Poverty
ECON 370B: YE1, Class #7904 

This course will examine the theory of income, inequality, discrimination and wealth. It will include an analysis and measurement of welfare, poverty, and an evaluation of the efficiency of public policy.

Catalog Description: Topics of current importance to consumers, resource owners, business, and government. May be repeated once as topics change. PRQ: ECON 260 and ECON 261.

Sowjanya Dharmasankar (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-Naperville in Room 131, Saturdays, 02/04, 03/24 and 03/31, 1 - 4 pm.

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GEOG 256/556 Spring 2012 CourseMaps and Mapping
GEOG 256/556: YE1, Class #s 7893/7894

Though maps have been used by civilizations for well over 5,000 years, practically all aspects of mapping today involve computers - from the collection of real-world data by GPS or satellites, to drafting and printing. Rather than study the history of maps and mapping, we will instead study the concept of maps as tools of modern communication and visualization. This course is also the starting point for NIU's certificate of undergraduate study in GIS (in addition to applying toward the B.G.S.) and is required for several further courses in geography. Mandatory introductory face-to-face class meeting.

Catalog Description, GEOG 256: Introduction to maps as models of our earth, tools of visualization, and forms of graphic communication. Use of satellite and aerial imagery, land surveying, and geographic information systems in map production. Thematic maps and how they are used. Map design for informational and persuasive purposes.
Catalog Description, GEOG 556: For graduate students with little formal background in mapping. Maps as models, tools of visualization, and forms of graphic communication. Processes of map production, including imagery and surveying. Principles of map design.

Kory Allred (3 credit hours) 

  • Online with a mandatory face-to-face meeting at NIU-Naperville in Room 115, Monday, 01/23, 6:30 – 9:15 pm 

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GEOG 306 Spring 2012 CourseSevere and Hazardous Weather
GEOG 306: YE1, Class #7908

Examination of fundamentals of atmospheric phenomena with an emphasis on understanding concepts and processes behind severe manifestations of weather and climate. Physical aspects of extratropical cyclones, winter weather phenomena, thunderstorm phenomena, tropical weather systems, and large-scale longer-term weather events are analyzed. Case studies are employed to investigate human, economic, and environmental consequences of extreme weather and climate events.

Catalog Description: Examination of fundamentals of atmospheric phenomena with an emphasis on understanding concepts and processes behind severe manifestations of weather and climate. Physical aspects of extratropical cyclones, winter weather phenomena, thunderstorm phenomena, tropical weather systems, and large-scale, longer-term weather events are anayzed. Case studies are employed to investigate human, economic, and environmental consequences of extreme weather and climate events.

Walker Ashley (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 01/23 - 05/07. No face-to-face meetings.

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GEOG 330 Spring 2012 CourseGeography of the U.S. and Canada
GEOG 330: YE1, Class #7892
 

This course is an introduction to geographic issues in various regions of the United States and Canada. You will be introduced to some major patterns and processes taht dominate the major physicla and cultural realms of this region. We will first go over some basic physical and social features common to the United States and Canada. We then will explore the historical evolution and unique physical, cultural, and environmental features of fourteen sub-regions, following your textbook. Rather than just describing each region, we will examine the various regions in an attempt to understand and explain regional differences. Ultimately, our exploration of these regions should help us all reach a deepter understanding of the diversity and complexity of life in the United States and Canada. A final project, map quizzes, and exams will all be utilized to increase your knowledge of this diverse and fascinating region.

Catalog Description: Regional analysis of the two countries. Cultural, economic, and political patterns. Geographic perspectives applied to current issues and problems.

Sharon Ashley (3 credit hours)  

  • Online with a mandatory face-to-face meeting at NIU-Naperville in Room 167, Wednesday, 01/18, 6:30 – 9:15 pm 

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GEOG 359/557 Spring 2012 CourseIntroduction to GIS
GEOG 359/557: YE1, CLass #s 8115/8117
 

Have you ever asked yourself, "Where in the world am I?" GEOG 359 may help you answer that question with an introductory study into the principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). In this online course, we develop skills in GIS, its components, and how it applies to our surrounding environment. This course is a primer for those who are interested in learning more about the dynamic and ever-changing world of GIS and its career applications.

Catalog Description, GEOG 359: Study of the fundamental principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Emphasis on the development of these systems, their components and their integration into mainstream geography. PRQ: GEOG 256 or consent of department.
Catalog Description, GEOG 557: For graduate students with little formal background in GIS or computer mapping. Principles, components, and uses of geographic information systems. PRQ: GEOG 552 or GEOG 556, or consent of department.
 

Philip Young (3 credit hours)  

  • Online with a mandatory face-to-face meeting at NIU-Rockford in Room 165, Tuesday, 01/17, 6:30-9:15 pm 

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GEOG 455/659 Spring 2012 CourseLand-use Planning/Regional Planning
GEOG 455/659: YE1, Class #s 7898/7899

Land Use Planning/Regional Planning is a course designed to study the processes and policies concerning land development decisions. Mapping and GIS decision-making techniques are applied to the analysis of urban growth and land-use patterns at global, national, state, regional, and local scales. Hands-on exercises developed for Google Earth and other GIS software incorporate land, environmental, demographic, and business information to demonstrate typical planning scenarios. In addition to applying towards the B.G.S., this class also counts toward NIU's certificate of undergraduate study in Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

Catalog Description, GEOG 455: Study of precesses and policies in land use and land development decisions. Mapping and GIS decision-making techniques applied to the analysis of land-use patterns and management conflicts at national, states regional, and local government scales. Lecture, laboratory, and field experience.
Catalog Description, GEOG 659: Geographic basis and practice of regional mapping, GIS, and spatial decision processes applied to land-use, social services, transportation, and environmental management concerns. Problems of integrating land, transportation, and environmental management over a multijurisdictional geography.
 

Richard Greene (3 credit hours)

  • Online with a mandatory face-to-face meeting at Elgin Community College in the Health & Business Technology Bldg. 162, Tuesday, 01/17, 6:30-9:15 pm

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GEOG 468/568 Spring 2012 CourseWorkshop in GIS
GEOG 468/568: YE1, Class #s 8118/8119

What are the essential building blocks required to create an effective Geographic Information System? This online course will use GIS software for the creation, manipulation, and presentation of data. The methodology will be a blended set of lessons and exercises which will include design, data capture, quality control, data management, and 3D. Students enrolled in the Homeland Security Program, GIS Certificate, or B.G.S. degree plan may be interested in taking this course.

Catalog Description, GEOG 468: Problems and techniques of GIS prototype development. Emphasis on GIS development and spatial database management for public sector applications such as land parcel mapping, emergency services, facilities management, and homeland security. The processes of design and production, editing and quality control, and final implementation of an operational product are stressed through applied projects. PRQ: GEOG 359 and consent of department.
Catalog Description, GEOG 568: Problems and techniques of GIS prototype development. Emphasis on GIS development and spatial database management for public sector applications such as land parcel mapping, emergency services, facilities management, and homeland security. The processes of design and production, editing and quality control, and final implementation of an operational product are stressed through applied projects. PRQ: GEOG 557 and consent of department.
 

Philip Young (3 credit hours)

  • Online with a mandatory face-to-face meetings at Elgin Community College in the Health & Business Technology Bldg. 162, Thursday, 01/19, 6:30 -9:15 pm.

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Women in Modern Europe
HIST 322: CE1, Class #7910
 

The history of women in modern Europe is a course about the experiences, achievements, and representations of women of all social classes since 1700. Students will be introduced to the ongoing debate about differences between men and women, the conflict between gender and class, as well as different types of feminism through lectures, readings, and discussions. Whenever possible, we will look at women's lives and experiences using a comparative framework. Consequently, modern Europe is boradly defined to stretch from Great Britain in the west to Russia in the east. Readings will focus on women's voices at critical historical junctures that include the more traditional wars, revolutions, and politics of the modern period. We will also look at cultural moments that have defined ideas about women and gender that have influenced lived experience. Readings for the class include primary sources, historical monographs, a novel, and a memoir.

Catalog Description: Critical examination of the experiences, achievements, and representations of women of all classes as well as the gendering of politics and culture since the 18th century. Use of a comparative approach in studying women from Great Britain in the west to Russia in the east whenever possible.

Sandra Dawson (3 credit hours)

  • NIU-Naperville in Room 162, Thursdays, 02/02 - 05/10, 6:30 – 9:15 pm.

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Religion in America to 1865
HIST 364: QE1, Class #7905
 

Beginning in the colonial period, this course will look at the interplay between religion and American society and culture up until 1865. With such a focus, this course will examine and assess religion's influence in the colonization and settlement of North America, the American Revolution, the founding of the American Nation, and the Civil War. This course will be part lecture and part discussion which requires students to actively engage, assess, and discuss the material as presented orally and/or through class readings.

Catalog Description: The transplanting of European denominations to the New World; their transformation under American conditions; the rise of indigenous faiths; relations between the churches and society and between church and state; the impact of revivalism on social reform.  

Jamie Hink (3 credit hours) 

  • NIU-Rockford in Room 200, Wednesdays, 02/01 - 05/09, 6:30 – 9:15 pm. 

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 HIST 475The United States and Southeast Asia
HIST 475: YE1, Class #7912

This course will examine the interactions between the United States and Southeast Asia. Running the gamut from economic aid to internal meddling to full scale war, the United States has had an intense relationship with all countries of Southeast Asia. Drawing on primary source foreign relations documents and secondary source historical readings, we will learn together about US-Southeast Asian interactions and students will research the histories of those entanglements.

Catalog Description: Foucs on 20th century, including American acquisition and governance of the Philippine Islands, the American response to nationalism and independence movements, the war in Vietnam, the successive tragedies in Cambodia, and U.S.-China rivalries in the region.  

Eric Jones (3 credit hours)  

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at Waubonsee Community College in Bodie Hall 102, Tuesdays, 01/31, 03/20, and 05/08, 6:30 – 9:15 pm. 

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Internship
ILAS 390

Catalogue Description: Work as an intern in an off-campus agency in activities related to one of the majors in the college. Reading and paper preparation under the supervision of a faculty member in the college. May be repeated once. S/U grading. PRQ: Consent of major department and college; junior or senior standing.  

Judy Santacaterina (3 credit hours)  

  • Location and times TBD in consultation with instructor. 

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POLS 300 Spring 2012 CourseAmerican Presidential Elections
POLS 300: YE1, Class #7916

Bachmann, Cain, Gingrich, Paul, Perry, Romney...the 2012 presidential campaign is well underway with incumbent President Barack Obama (D) facing a large group of potential GOP contestants. The primary season is expected to begin earlier than ever -- perhaps as early as December 2011 -- with subsequent contests taking place throughout the spring. Who are the candidates, what are the issues, and how does 2012 compare to past election years? These are the central questions we will be exploring in this online course. Through readings, on-line discussions, and multimedia, we will follow the current candidates and primaries throughout the semester, as well as take a look back at previous contests for the presidency, paying particular attention to the more recent, modern period. How similar or different is 2012 from previous years? Who will be the Republican nominee? Can the president win reelection?

Catalog Description: Survey and analysis of candidates, issues, and partisan trends in presidential elections from the era of the New Deal to the present. Also considers how election rules and campaign styles have changed over time. Recommended: At least sophomore standing.

Art Ward (3 credit hours)  

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at NIU-Rockford in Room 165, Thursdays, 02/02, 03/22, and 05/10, 6:30 – 9:15 pm. 

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Introduction to Psychopathology
PSYC 316: CE1, Class #8195
 

The major objective in this course is for students to develop an understanding of psychopathology as a variant of normal behavior. It is hoped that students will come to view human behavior on a continuum where psychopathology represents a departure from normal behavior in that it is more extreme, exaggerated, disabling, maladaptive, distressing, and/or distrubing to others within the context of the person's environment or to society. Students are expected to become familiar with the various paradigmatic viewpoints exploring the depth of all diagnosable psycho-pathological disorders. Students will become familiar with the current methods of classification and diagnosis of psychopathology and gain an understanding of the treatments that are used to help individuals and families who experience these conditions. Finally, familiarization with research and research methods will be an important part of the course, as it reflects an essential component of the science of psychology.

Catalog Description: Introduction to the study of pathological behavior. The development, maintenance, and treatment of problem behavior discussed from theoretical, empirical, and clinical perspectives. PRQ: At least sophomore standing and PSYC 102, or consent of department.

Phillip Krasula (3 credit hours)  

  • NIU-Naperville in Room 130, Saturdays, 02/04 - 05/05, 9 am – 12 pm. 

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Personality
PSYC 332: DE1, Class #7915
 
 

Consideration of basic factors in personality and the role of personality in the study of behavior. A critical examination of the theories and concepts of personality traits including historical theories, temperament, development of one's potential, implications of culture, continuity, and change across time.

Catalog Description: Consideration of basic factors in personality and the role of personality in the study of behavior. Discussion and critical examination of contemporary studies in personality, with emphasis on experimental evidence. PRQ: At least sophomore standing and PSYC 102, or consent of department. 

Joanne Messina (3 credit hours)  

  • Elgin Community College in the Health & Business Technolog Bldg. 162, Thursdays, 02/02 - 05/10, 6:30 – 9:15 pm. 

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Families and Social Change
SOCI 354: DE1, Class #7914

This course looks at the contemporary American family from a sociological perspective. The selection of a partner or spouse, the decision to have children (including when and how many), as well as internal family dynamics, are all very intimate and personal decisions made by individuals throughout their lives. However, each of these actions are directly impacted and influenced by the society in which one lives, often in hidden and unexplored ways. We will examine the family in cultural, historical, and political contexts to further your understanding of current conceptions of the changing, and as believed by some, threatened family structure in the U.S.

This course will use film, current events, research, and class discussion to explore the American family. We will examine the important influences of social class, gender, sexual orientation, and race/ethnicity on families, and how these social factors impact individuals, influence social policy, and create our overall societal conception of the family. Students will gain an understanding of the historical roots of contemporary American family ideologies and practices, as well as evaluate changes in family life in light of larger societal shifts, with a particular focus on the past 60 years. Students will also learn how family adaptive behaviors, in turn, come to shape the larger society.

Assessment requirements for the course will include the reading of assigned text selections, an examination of the family in popular media, film analysis, and generation of a research paper on a topic of choice related to family issues.

Catalog Description: Introduction to family sociological and historical research, focusing on the diversity and adaptability of families in changing contemporary American society. Emphasis on how large social trends and forces such as economic transitions, governmental policies, and societal values and beliefs affect families as units and family members as individuals. Attention given to understanding the dynamic social construction of gender within and outside of families. PRQ: SOCI 170 or SOCI 250 or SOCI 260 or SOCI 270, or consent of department. 

Mary Landeros (3 credit hours)  

  • NIU-Hoffman Estates in Room 105, Tuesdays, 01/31 - 05/08, 6:30- 9:15 pm 

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WOMS 424/524Game Design: Introducing Young Women to Technology
WOMS 424/524: YE1, Class #8112/8123

This class will explore some of the reasons that young women avoid computer programming, although it is an important and enjoyable field for women. Students will work in groups to design and implement their own game after writing variations of several well-known existing games. The course is open to women and men of all backgrounds. No experience with computer programming is required or expected. Students need access to broadband internet and a PC where they can install the Game Maker software.

Catalog Description: Selected issues and topics pertaining to gender and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics; how gender and sexuality are defined by and define these fields; contributions of women to scientific developments. 

Georgia Brown and Reva Freedman (3 credit hours)  

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at Waubonsee Community College in Weigel Hall 236, Mondays, 01/30, 03/19, and 05/07, 6:30- 9:15 pm 

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WOMS 430 Spring 2012 CourseWomen's Self-Representation
WOMS 430: YE1, Class #7879

This course will take a multidisciplinary feminist approach to women's self-representation using theories from psychology, history, literature, and art history to examine the ways that women in different times and cultures represent themselves and their relationships to broader social and cultural forces. We may draw on women's letters, diaries, autobiographical writings, self-portraits, and public speeches.

Catalog Description: May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours as topic changes. PRQ: Junior or senior standing or consent of director. 

Lise Schlosser (3 credit hours)  

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at NIU-Hoffman Estates in Room 124, Thursdays, 02/02, 03/22, and 05/10, 6:30- 9:15 pm 

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WOMS 430/ARTH 485 Spring 2012 CourseThe History of Women in Western Art
WOMS 430/ARTH 485: YE2, Class #s 8008/8007

In this course, we will examine the history of women as both creators and subjects of visual art in the West. Considerations will be given to how gender is relevant to the definition, creation, and appreciation of art. Through online lectures, readings, assignments, and online discussions, students will be able to: understand and discuss the diversity of women's artistic expressions throughout history and diverse western cultures; analyze and articulate the influence that gender, race, sexual orientation, economic class, and other aspects of identity have on the creation and reception of women's art forms; and assess the implicaitons of gender on definitions of art and the writing or art history.

Catalog Description, WOMS 430: May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours as topic changes. PRQ: Junior or senior standing or consent of director.
Catalog Description, ARTH 485: Topics announced. May be repeated, but credit is limited to 3 semester hours per topic.
 

Rebekah Kohli (3 credit hours)  

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at NIU-Rockford in Room 201, Saturdays, 02/04, 03/24, and 05/05, 1 - 4 pm 

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Haunted America: Ghosts in American Literature
ENGL 607: CE1, Class #7885

Do ghosts actually roam the earth? Do things really go "bump in the night?" Americans seem to have a fascination with ghosts. Nickelodeon airs Scooby Doo and Casper re-runs. Hollywood has made movies like: Scooby Doo, The Sixth Sense, Casper the Friendly Ghost, Ghostbusters, Ghost, The Lady in White, The Ghosts of Mississippi, Harvey, The Piano Lesson, and Truly, Madly, Deeply, to name a few. What do these popular television shows and 'flicks'have in common? What do directors and producers want audiences to derive from these movies (other than spending $10 for a movie ticket and popcorn)? In general, why do ghosts (fictional and/or literal) visit the living? These represent some questions we will ask and they will help us "bring to life" ghost stories by nineteenth and twentieth century American authors of different religions, genders, and races. We will arrive at answers to the above questions by asking questions expected of literary scholarship, such as character development, point-of-view, tone, etc. We will also situate texts in their historical context and ask questions regarding gender, race, class, religion, and psychology.

Catalog Description: Study of special topics and periods of literature. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 semester hours when topic varies. 

Deborah De Rosa (3 credit hours)  

  • NIU-Naperville, Wednesdays, 01/18 - 05/09, 6:30- 9:15 pm 

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ENVS 305 Spring 2012 CourseGreen Technologies
ENVS 305: YE1, Class #7784

Catalog Description: Introduction to engineering and technological advances which are more environmentally friendly and new technologies that utilize green principles and green transportation. Includes topics in new areas of green manufacturing and materials used today and planned for the future, including the operation and manufacture of solar cells and the production of wind, thermal, and hydroelectric power. Topics will vary depending upon new trends in industry. On-site visits to green industries in the region. PRQ: CHEM 110 and MATH 155. 

Xueshu Song (3 credit hours)  

  • Fully online course, 01/16 - 05/12. 

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Supervision in the Public Sector
PSPA 410: SEE1, Class #7983

Catalog Description: State and municipal involvement in employee-management relations with emphasis on legislative, judicial, political, and social considerations. Comparisons with the private sector and the special bargaining problems of various units in the public sector are considered. 

James Norris (1 credit hours)  

  • Harper College in Room Z-229, Tuesdays, 02/07, 02/14, and 02/21, 5 - 10 pm 

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Community Engagement in Public Safety Agencies
PSPA 413: SEE1, Class #7980

Catalog Description: Exploration of how community engagement can benefit public safety agencies, including a review of the various avenues to engage citizens in departmental activities and proper roles for such engagement. 

Heidi Koenig (1 credit hours)  

  • Harper College in Room Z-229, Tuesdays, 01/17, 01/24, and 01/31, 5 - 10 pm 

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Scope and Dynamics of Public Administration
PSPA 600: PDE1, Class #7991

Catalog Description: Examination of the history of public administration and the basic issues which confront it including administrative responsibility and ethics, and the formulation and implementation of public policy. 

Kimberly Nelson (3 credit hours)  

  • NIU-Hoffman Estates in Room 107, Mondays, 01/23 - 05/07, 3:30 - 6:10 pm 

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Data Analysis in Public Administration
PSPA 601: PDE1, Class #7917

Catalog Description: Examination of techniques for the collection, manipulation, interpretation, and presentation of data and information in public policy/management processes, and demonstrates applications of the techniques using micro-computer technology. 

Paul Culhane (3 credit hours)  

  • NIU-Hoffman Estates in Room 107, Mondays, 01/23 - 05/07, 6:30 - 9:10 pm 

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Organization Theory and Behavior
PSPA 605: PQE1, Class #7985

Catalog Description: Survey of theory and research on organizations relevant to public administration, with a focus on key organizational functions and ways of defining and responding to organizational problems. Recommended: PSPA 600. 

Gerald Gabris (3 credit hours)  

  • NIU-Rockford in Room 204, Tuesdays, 01/17 - 05/08, 6:30 - 9:10 pm 

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Public Budgeting and Financial Management
PSPA 610: PCE1, Class #7996

Catalog Description: Examination of the public budgetary process and related financial management techniques. 

Curtis Wood (3 credit hours)  

  • NIU-Naperville in Room 256, Thursdays, 01/19 - 03/08, 5 - 10 pm 

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Grant Writing
PSPA 621: PCE1, Class #7994

Catalog Description: Specialized and applied instruction in grant writing, including identifying potential grants, drafting proposals, administrating awarded funds, and understanding legal obligations. 

Daniel Templin (1 credit hours)  

  • NIU-Naperville in Room 121, Saturdays, 01/28 and 02/04, 9 am - 4 pm 

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Fundraising
PSPA 622: PCE1, Class #7993

Catalog Description: Specialized and applied instruction in fundraising, including solicitation techniques, donor recruitment, and customer relationship management technologies. 

Vicki Clarke (1 credit hours)  

  • NIU-Naperville in Room 121, Friday, 03/02, 6 - 10 pm and Saturday, 03/03, 9 am - 5 pm 

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Advocacy for Nonprofit Organizations
PSPA 623: PCE1, Class #7986

Catalog Description: Specialized and applied instruction to advocate on behalf of a nonprofit organization in the public policy process, including the formation and evaluation of policies. 

Shawn Jeffers (1 credit hours)  

  • NIU-Naperville in Room 121, Friday, 04/13, 6 - 10 pm and Saturday, 04/14, 9 am - 5 pm 

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Nongovernmental Organizations and Governance
PSPA 626: DE1, Class #7990

Catalog Description: Introduction to the role of non-governmental organizations in public service delivery in the United States and globall, including the size, scope, ethics, and legal framework of such entities. 

Frederick Mayhew (3 credit hours)  

  • NIU-Hoffman Estates in Room 107, Wednesdays, 01/18 - 05/09, 3:30 - 6:10 pm 

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Citizen Participation
PSPA 633: CE1, Class #7989

Catalog Description: Introduction to the study of citizen participation theories and application of those theories in government. Topics include citizen involvement in local government processes, accountability, and tools used to involve citizens in local government activities. 

Heidi Koenig (3 credit hours)  

  • NIU-Naperville in Room 256, Wednesdays, 01/18 - 05/09, 6:30 - 9:10 pm 

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Intermediate Public and Nonprofit Financial Management
PSPA 653: PCE1, Class #7998

Catalog Description: Advanced topics in financial management essential for public managers seeking specialized knowledge in public budgeting and financial management. Topics typically include: debt management, risk management policy, revenue policy, fundraising strategies, auditing, cash and investment management and policies, and revenue forecasting. 

Curtis Wood (3 credit hours)  

  • NIU-Naperville in Room 256, Thursdays, 03/22 - 05/10, 5 - 10 pm 

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