Degrees & Courses

Fall 2012

Regular Session

August 27 - December 14, 2012

Off-Campus Courses
&
Online Courses

REGISTRATION | COSTS | LOCATION | OFF-CAMPUS COURSES | ONLINE COURSES

Course Descriptions
ANTH | BIOS | ECON | GEOG | HIST | ILAS | LGBT | POLS | PSYC | SOCI | STAT | WOMS

 


 

PLEASE CALL 815-753-5200 for permit course information. Course details may change. For the most up-to-date information, please see our online listings: www.niu.edu/lasbgs

ATTENTION BGS STUDENTS:
You will apply for graduation during the semester in which you register for your final term. You should meet with your advisor to determine that you are registering for the correct courses. You and your advisor must be certain that your file in Registration and Records is complete and accurate with all documents (transcripts, grade changes, substitutions, adviser approval letters) and information necessary for graduation. Please carefully review your Academic Advising Report for accuracy. It is your responsibility to contact your advisor with any questions regarding descrepancies that appear on this report. You may review your Academic Advising Report through MyNIU.

The deadline for applying for spring 2013 graduation is December 1, 2012. You must have at least 90 total semester hours to apply for graduation. The $29.00 graduation fee will be billed to your student account. Absolutely no late applications will be accepted. 

Registration for Summer and Fall 2012 begins the week of April 2, 2012. Students will be assigned registration appointments mid March 2012. Registration appointments are assigned based on the number of cumulative hours. Beginning mid March, students may check MyNIU for their appointment day and time. Students may register on or after the assigned appointment day and time as long as there are not any holds assigned to their record. All new undergraduate students are allowed to register after meeting with an academic advisor following their orientation session (providing the appointment day and time has been reached). 

If you are unfamiliar with the MyNIU system and/or would like some assistance, please visit www.niu.edu/erptraining/myniu-sa/studentcenter.shtml.

Course titled with a computer means that the class is offered online.

 

ANTH 491Current Topics in Anthropology:
Diversity in the Workplace
ANTH 491: YE1, Class #19415

This course will involve an examination of diversity including ethnic, racial, gender, age and other factors which impact the culture of interaction in the workplace. Readings, lecture, videos, interactive exercises and student experience will illustrate topics and lead to a better understanding of the origins and ongoing existence of multiculturalism within the contexts of domestic and global work settings.

Catalog Description: May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours.

Judith Calleja (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at NIU-Naperville, Thursdays, 09/06, 10/18, and 12/06, 6:30 – 9:15 pm.

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BIOS 442/542Evolution and the Creationist Challenge
BIOS 442/542: YE1, Class #s 19416/19417

The perennial culture wars raging in the USA are expressed in many areas of society. One area of attack is the opposition by the Religious Right to the teaching of evolution in public schools. Since before the famous "Scopes Monkey Trial" in 1925, school boards and legislatures have tried to eliminate, add equal doses of creationism to, or water down the coverage of evolution. They have targeted evolution as a cause for many of their perceived "social evils," don't understand science, and cannot separate evolution from "Social Darwinism."

This course will introduce students to the history of the controversy, define the opposition, explain where each side gets their ideas, and what they believe. We will then explore philosophy of science in enough detail to be able to separate a scientific question from a non-scientific question. A preliminary survey of primarily biological evolution will provide students with the necessary information to counter creationist arguments. This course is designed to give students the ability to not only defend evolution but, more importantly, attack non-scientific intrusions into the public school system. It is not a course in biological evolution but complementary, and can be taken by any upper-level undergraduate with an interest in science and society.

Catalog Description: Evolutionary theory and tenets of present-day anti-evolutionists with emphasis on providing students with the skills to articulate the theory of evolution as it applies to the biological sciences. Not designed as a substitute for a formal course in evolutionary theory. Recommended for students pursuing careers in secondary science education.

Ronald Toth (3 credit hours)

  • Online with one mandatory face-to-face meeting at Elgin Community College, Saturday, 09/08, 1 - 4 pm.

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ECON 261Principles of Macroeconomics
ECON 261: Section 0006 Class #15785

Catalog Description: Introductory study of factors determining aggregate income, employment, and general price level. Such factors include roles of government, the banking system, and international monetary relations. Sophomore standing recommended unless student is majoring or minoring in economics.

Tammy Batson (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-DeKalb, DuSable Hall 276, Fridays, 10/12, 11/16, 2 - 7 pm and Monday, 12/10, 5 - 7 pm.

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ECON 370Current Economic Issues:
Economics and Equity
ECON 370C: YE1, Class #19418

This course is a study of economics with a heart, a normative approach. It covers concepts in economics leading to understanding of equity, efficiency, and welfare. Students will be able to understand how different forms of economic activities, policies, and methods of government resource allocations will be affecting the well-being of different groups of people and businesses. HOw income and resource distribution in society, as well as understanding of poverty, discrimination, equity, and efficiency effects of government programs will be explored.

Catalog Description: Topics of current importance to consumers, resource owners, business, and government. May be repeated once as topics change. PRQ: ECON 260 and ECON 261.

Sowjanya Dharmasankar (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-Naperville, Saturdays, 09/15, 10/20, and 10/27, 1 - 4 pm.

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ECON 393Introduction to Mathematical Methods in Economics
ECON 393: Section 0001 Class #19056

Catalog Description: Descriptions of static economic models by means of elementary calculus and matrix algebra; application and interpretation of the general linear model in economics. PRQ: Math 211 or Math 229; Econ 260 and Econ 261. CRQ: Econ 393A

Susan Porter-Hudak (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 mandatory face-to-face meetings at NIU-DeKalb, DuSable Hall 274, Tuesdays, 09/25, 11/06, and 12/11, 6 - 7:15 pm.

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GEOG 256/556Maps and Mapping/Fundamentals of Mapping
GEOG 256/556: YE1, Class #s 19419/19420

Though maps have been used by civilizations for well over 5,000 years, practically all aspects of mapping today involve computers – from the collection of real-world data by GPS or satellites, to drafting and printing. Rather than study the history of maps and mapping, we will instead study the concept of maps as tools of modern communication and visualization. This course is also the starting point for NIU’s certificate of undergraduate study in GIS (in addition to applying toward the B.G.S.) and is required for several further courses in geography. Mandatory introductory face-to-face class meeting.

Catalog Description, GEOG 256: Introduction to maps as models of our earth, tools of visualization, and forms of graphic communication. Use of satellite and aerial imagery, land surveying, and geographic information systems in map production. Thematic maps and how they are used. Map design for informational and persuasive purposes. Two hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory.
Catalog Description, GEOG 556: For graduate students with little formal background in mapping. Maps as models, tools of visualization, and forms of graphic communication. Processes of map production, including imagery and surveying. Principles of map design.

Staff (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/27 - 12/16.

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GEOG 303Water Resources and the Environment
GEOG 303: YE1, Class #19421

This course is intended to provide the student with a broader understanding of water and its importance to our lives and earth’s complex environment. We will consider issues facing water such as whether the supply of water will continue, how man-made developments have altered water availability, how pollution has eroded this natural resource, and where/how we can restore our water resources. Relevant video clips, online tutorials, and supplemental readings will be used throughout the course to provide examples of water-related issues affecting northern Illinois, other regions of the U.S., as well as various countries around the world.

Catalog Description: Evaluation of water as a resource; its availability, distribution, use, and quality. Operation of the hydrologic cycle and relationships between surface water and the soil, groundwater, and atmosphere. Human impacts on water resources and the management of water-related hazards, including flooding, drought, and the spread of disease. Lecture and field experience.

Sharon Ashley (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online coure, 08/27 - 12/16.

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GEOG 306Severe and Hazardous Weather
GEOG 306: YE1, Class #19422

Examination of fundamentals of atmospheric phenomena with an emphasis on understanding concepts and processes behind severe manifestations of weather and climate. Physical aspects of extratropical cyclones, winter weather phenomena, thunderstorm phenomena, tropical weather systems, and large-scale longer-term weather events are analyzed. Case studies are employed to investigate human, economic, and environmental consequences of extreme weather and climate events.

Catalog Description: Examination of fundamentals of atmospheric phenomena with an emphasis on understanding concepts and processes behind severe manifestations of weather and climate. Physical aspects of extratropical cyclones, winter weather phenomena, thunderstorm phenomena, tropical weather systems, and large-scale, longer-term weather events are analyzed. Case studies are employed to investigate human, economic, and environmental consequences of extreme weather and climate events.

Sharon Ashley (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/27 - 12/16.

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GEOG 359/557Introduction to Geographic Information Systems/
Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems
GEOG 359/557: YE1, CLass #s 19423/19424

Have you ever asked yourself, “Where in the world am I?” GEOG 359 may help you answer that question with an introductory study into the principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). In this online course, we develop skills in GIS, its components, and how it applies to our surrounding environment. This course is a primer for those who are interested in learning more about the dynamic and ever-changing world of GIS and its career applications.

Catalog Description, GEOG 359: Study of the fundamental principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Emphasis on the development of these systems, their components and their integration into mainstream geography. Two hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory. PRQ: GEOG 256 or consent of department.
Catalog Description, GEOG 557: For graduate students with little formal background in GIS or computer mapping. Principles, components, and uses of geographic information systems. PRQ: GEOG 552 or GEOG 556, or consent of department.

Phil Young (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/27 - 12/16.

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GEOG 408/508Tropical Environmental Hazards
GEOG 408/508: YE1, Class #s 19425/16426

Are hazards the same globally? Understanding of tropical hazards is essential in order to mitigate the losses in property and life these systems produce. Traditional approaches to hazard assessment cast hazards as static and linear, assuming only one causal factor. During the past half-century, however, it has come to light that natural hazards and the technological hazards that accompany them are not problems that can be solved in isolation. Many losses—rather than stemming from unexpected events—are the predictable result of interactions among three major systems: the physical environment, the social and demographic characteristics of the community that experience them, and the components of the built environment. Natural hazards do not exist independently of society because these perils are defined, reshaped, and redirected by human actions. This course in tropical environmental hazards will focus on these complex interactions between earth surface systems and the physical and social environment by examining Southeast Asia.

Catalog Description, GEOG 408: Examination of natural hazards focusing on Southeast Asia. Tsunamis, monsoons, typhoons, flooding, droughts, and urban hazards are explored. Interactions among the following three major systems are analyzed with respect to shaping these hazards: the physical environment, social and demographic characteristics, and components of the built environment. PRQ: GEOG 101 or GEOG 105 or GEOG 306 or GEOL 120 or consent of the department.
Catalog Description, GEOG 508: Examination of natural hazards focusing on Southeast Asia. Tsunamis, monsoons, typhoons, flooding, droughts, and urban hazards are explored. Interactions among three major systems are analyzed with respect to shaping these hazards: the physical environment, social and demographic characteristics, and components of the built environment.

Mace Bentley (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/27 - 12/16.

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GEOG 455/659Land-Use Planning/Regional Planning
GEOG 455/659: YE1, Class #s 19427/19428

Land Use Planning/Regional Planning is a course designed to study the processes and policies concerning land development decisions. Mapping and GIS decision-making techniques are applied to the analysis of urban growth and land-use patterns at global, national, state, regional, and local scales. Hands-on exercises developed for Google Earth and other GIS software incorporate land, environmental, demographic, and business information to demonstrate typical planning scenarios. In addition to applying towards the B.G.S., this class also counts toward NIU’s certificate of undergraduate study in Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

Catalog Description, GEOG 455: Study of processes and policies in land use and land development decisions. Mapping and GIS decision-making techniques applied to the analysis of land-use patterns and management conflicts at national, state, regional, and local government scales. Lecture, laboratory, and field experience.
Catalog Description, GEOG 659: Geographic basis and practice of regional mapping, GIS, and spatial decision processes applied to land-use, social services, transportation, and environmental management concerns. Problems of integrating land, transportation, and environmental management over a multijurisdictional geography.

Richard Greene (3 credit hours)

  • Online with one face-to-face meeting at NIU-Rockford, Monday, 08/27, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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GEOG 468/568Workshop in GIS
GEOG 468/568: YE1, Class #s 19429/19430

What are the essential building blocks required to create an effective Geographic Information System? This online course will use GIS software for the creation, manipulation, and presentation of data. The methodology will be a blended set of lessons and exercises which will include design, data capture, quality control, data management, and 3D. Students enrolled in the Homeland Security Program, GIS Certificate, or B.G.S. degree plan may be interested in taking this course.

Catalog Description, GEOG 468: Problems and techniques of GIS prototype development. Emphasis on GIS development and spatial database management for public sector applications such as land parcel mapping, emergency services, facilities management, and homeland security. The processes of design and production, editing and quality control, and final implementation of an operational product are stressed through applied projects. PRQ: GEOG 359 and consent of department.
Catalog Description, GEOG 568: Problems and techniques of GIS prototype development. Emphasis on GIS development and spatial database management for public sector applications such as land parcel mapping, emergency services, facilities management, and homeland security. The processes of design and production, editing and quality control, and final implementation of an operational product are stressed through applied projects. PRQ: GEOG 557 and consent of department.

Phil Young (3 credit hours)

  • Fully online course, 08/27 - 12/16.

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History of Science to Newton
HIST 323: CE1, Class # 19431

This course surveys the origins of and various developments in Western science from the Ancient Greeks through the seventeenth century. It focuses on attitudes towards and beliefs about the natural world and man’s place within it in a variety of historical settings, examining how both the questions asked and answers given have changed over time. A variety of scientific fields will be examined, including astronomy, physics, mathematics, biology, anatomy and medicine. This is an introductory historical survey and does not require prior scientific or technical knowledge.

Catalog Description: Science in the ancient Near East; Hellenic and Hellenistic science; the Arabs; medieval science; the Copernican revolution; the new physics; and the new biology. PRQ: At least sophomore standing.

Kristy Wilson-Bowers (3 credit hours)

  • NIU-Naperville, Wednesdays, 09/12 - 12/12, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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American Military History
HIST 379: DE1, Class # 19433

This course is a survey of the major events that shaped the evolution of the U.S. military from the early 1600's to the latter half of the 20th century. The course will be divided into seven sections: 1. The Colonial Era; 2. The Revolutionary War; 3. The Civil War; 4. Western Expansion and Imperialism; 5. The U.S. Military and World War I; 6. The U.S. Military and World War II; 7. The Cold War and Vietnam. In addition to analyzing issues such as strategy, tactics and weapons, we will also relate military developments to broader topics such as race, class, gender, economic changes and political ideology. Students will read five monographs and a compilation of primary and secondary sources. Students will be require to take a midterm and final exam, write one book review of one of the assigned monographs and complete a seven to ten page research paper.

Catalog Description: History of the American military experience from colonial times to the present.

Robert Hagaman (3 credit hours)

  • NIU-Hoffman Estates, Tuesdays, 09/11 - 12/11, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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World War II
HIST 425: QE1, Class #19782

This course is an intensive examination of World War II. It will focus on the events leading up to war, the actors involved, the war itself, and the social, cultural, and political aftereffects. This course will be part lecture and part discussion and will require students to actively engage, assess, and discuss the material as presented orally and through primary-source readings. We will also engage the historiographical debates concerning the war through an examination of recent monographs. Finally, we will investigate specific topics related to the war through presentations by students on topics they have chosen for original research.

Catalog Description: History of World War II, including objectives and ideologies of Nazi Germany, Imperial Japan, and Allied Powers, with attention to cultural and social developments.

Scott Gurman (3 credit hours)

  • NIU-Rockford, Thursdays, 09/10 - 12/16, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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HIST 447History of Burma
HIST 447: YE1, Class #19434

From ancient ruins to its ruinous experiment with democracy and recent thaw, Burma manages to hold the world’s interest and attention. In our course, we will look closely at the history of and scholarship on Burma to make sense of this fascinating and diverse Southeast Asian country. Through primary and secondary source material, our focus will be on two main periods/events: the British colonial era and the democracy struggle as epitomized by Aung San Suu Kyi.

Catalog Description: History and culture of Burma from prehistoric times to the present.

Eric Jones (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at Waubonsee Community College, Mondays, 09/10, 10/22, and 12/10, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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Internship
ILAS 390: CE1, CLass # TBA

Catalog Description: Work as an intern in an off-campus agency in activities related to one of the majors in the college. Reading and paper preparation under the supervision of a faculty member in the college. May be repeated once. S/U grading. PRQ: Consent of major department and college; junior or senior standing.

Judy Santacaterina (3 credit hours)

  • Location and times TBD in consultation with instructor.

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Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies
LGBT 350: YE1, Class #19436

This course is designed to be a survey of issues and theories in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender studies. We will be exploring interdisciplinary perspectives on sexual orientation and gender identity with attention to race, ethnicity, and class. Students will practice applying theories and concepts to the analysis of scholarship and to the analysis of current events and culture. Course goals: To develop understanding of fundamental issues, concepts, and theories in LGBT studies; To develop understanding of how gender identity and sexual orientation function inhuman societies; To cultivate skills of applying theories and information developed in LGBT studies to the analysis of social and cultural practices; To practice critical thinking and writing skills.

Catalog Description: Survey of issues and theories in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender studies. Interdisciplinary study of sexual orientation and gender identity, with attention to race, ethnicity, and class.

Meredith Frederich (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at NIU-Hoffman Estates, Wednesdays, 09/05, 10/17, and 12/05, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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POLS 307The U.S. Congress
POLS 307: YE1, Class #19437

This is a course on the United States Congress and is intended to familiarize students with practical aspects of the functioning of Congress, but also acquaint students with some of the major modern academic debates about the effectiveness of the U.S. legislature. Students successfully completing the course will gain an appreciation for the multifarious institutions that make up the U.S. Congress; pros and cons of specific institutional arrangements; will improve their social science related vocabulary; and become more familiar with the way laws are made (or not made) today.

Catalog Description: Principles, organization, procedures, and activities of the U.S. Congress. Topics include elections, legislators and their districts, legislative committees, party leadership positions, and legislative-executive relations. Recommended: At least sophomore standing.

Scot Schraugnagel (3 credit hours)

  • Online with one face-to-face meeting at NIU-Rockford, Wednesday, 09/05, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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POLS 414Topics in Law and Social Problems:
Law, Politics, and Baseball
POLS 414: YE1, Class #19438

Baseball is America’s national pastime. But it is much more than just a game. In this course we will use baseball as a case study of how law and politics function in America. The course is designed for both the baseball novice as well as the expert and we particularly welcome those who are new to the game. Why? Because the course is not really about baseball per se. Instead, we will examine how baseball has been reflective of broader legal and political issues such as gambling and drugs, race and sex discrimination, and business-labor relations and how baseball has come to be the only “business” in America with a constitutional exemption from anti-trust laws. We will explore these and other themes through readings, discussions, and films.

Catalog Description: Examination and analysis of the enduring questions of importance for the legal system. Problems illustrating the intersection of law, morality, and politics are set in the context of contemporary issues. Specific focus of the course changes each semester. May be repeated once as topic changes. Recommended: At least sophomore standing.

Artemus Ward (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at NIU-Naperville, Tuesdays, 09/11, 10/23, and 12/11, 6:30 - 9:15pm.

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PSYC 315Behavior Disturbances in Children
PSYC 315: YE1, Class #19451

This course will focus on major forms of atypical development in childhood and adolescence. These include developmental and learning problems (e.g., autism, mental retardation), disorders of behaviors (e.g., ADHD and oppositional disorder), and disorders of emotion (e.g., anxiety and depression). You will learn about the defining characteristics, associated features, possible causes, theoretical formulations, research evidence, and current approaches to intervention and prevention for these disorders. The course will be experiential in nature and involve engaging class discussions relating to present topics concerning childhood psychological disorders.

Catalog Description: Disturbances in children involving intellectual, emotional, and expressive behaviors as well as selected therapeutic procedures and their relationship to psychological theories and research. PRQ: At least sophomore standing and PSYC 102, or consent of department.

Phil Krasula (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at Elgin Community College, Thursdays, 09/13, 10/25, and 12/13, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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Personality
PSYC 332: CE1, Class #19452

Personality is defined as consistent behavior patterns and intrapersonal processes originating within the individual. This course will focus on the study of individuals and examine the major contributions made to the field of personality by renowned psychologists. Class sessions will enhance student learning on the Psychoanalytic Approach (Freudian Theory); New-Freudian Theories; Trait Approach; Biological Approach; Humanistic Approach; Behavioral/Social Learning Approach and the Cognitive Approach. Lecture and films will be presented in class sessions followed by open group discussion and activities to identify and clarify critical issues and concepts presented in the text.

Catalog Description: Consideration of basic factors in personality and the role of personality in the study of behavior. Discussion and critical examination of contemporary studies in personality, with emphasis on experimental evidence. PRQ: At least sophomore standing and PSYC 102, or consent of department.

Joanne Messina (3 credit hours)

  • NIU-Naperville, Saturdays, 09/08 - 12/08, 1 - 4 pm.

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The Sociology of Gender
SOCI 357: DE1, Class #19548

Gender is significant in our society because it is a master status, cutting across all aspects of our social lives. At birth we are assigned a sex – male or female – yet it is society that dictates the “proper” behaviors and attitudes regarding masculinity and femininity. Sex is such a salient division in society that we often come to believe that differences between men and women are “natural.” The dominant sociological position, however, is that social factors, not biological ones, explain societal differences between men and women. Therefore, the emphasis of this class is to explore and investigate everyday aspects of gender in order to make it more visible. This course will use film, current events, research, and class discussion to explore societal conceptions of gender, including experiences of diverse populations. We will focus on both the interpersonal and institutional aspects of gender. In order to understand how social institutions both shape and dictate our conceptions of gender we will do an in-depth exploration of prostitution in society. Assessments for this course include the reading of assigned text selections, various hands-on research assignments, an examination of gender in popular media, and a final paper that ties together theoretical aspects of gender to the issue of prostitution.

Catalog Description: Introduction to the current body of theory and research on gender from a critical social science perspective. Evaluates differences between biological maleness and femaleness and the social construction of contemporary gender identity. Emphasis on everyday processes of gender, including experiences of diverse populations across a range of social institutions. PRQ: SOCI 170 or SOCI 250 or SOCI 260 or SOCI 270, or consent of department.

Mary Landeros (3 credit hours)

  • NIU-Hoffman Estates, Mondays, 09/10 - 12/10, 6:30 - 9:15 pm.

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STAT 301Elementary Statistics
STAT 301: YE1 & YE2, Class #s 19454/19455

Introduction to basic concepts in statistical methods including probability, theoretical and empirical distributions, estimation, tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation, and single classification analysis of variance procedures. Not available for credit toward the major in mathematical sciences. Not used in major GPA calculation for mathematical sciences majors.

Catalog Description: Introduction to basic concepts in statistical methods including probability, theoretical and empirical distributions, estimation, tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation, and single classification analysis of variance procedures. Not available for credit toward the major in mathematical sciences. Not used in major GPA calculation for mathematical sciences majors. PRQ: MATH 206 or MATH 210 or MATH 211 or MATH 229.

Claudine Myers (3 credit hours)

  • Section YE1 meets online with 3 face-to-face meetings at NIU-Hoffman Estates, Mondays, 08/27, 10/08, and 12/10, 6:30 – 9:15 pm.
  • Section YE2 meets online with 3 face-to-face meetings at Elgin Community College, Tuesdays, 08/28, 10/09, and 12/11, 6:30 – 9:15 pm.

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WOMS 430/530Special Topics in Women's Studies:
Contemporary Women in South Asia
WOMS 430/530: YE1, Class #s 19457/19458

This course will be an interdisciplinary Women’s/Gender Studies course that focuses on India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan. The rationale for choosing these countries is that the idea of “woman” has been co-opted in ideological clashes among diverse entities that have strategic interests in the region, yet few of these stakeholders are genuinely committed to either feminism or women’s human rights. Although similar problems exist in many parts of the world, it is made especially visible by a unique confluence of factors in India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan.

An interdisciplinary approach that draws on content, research, and teaching associated with ethnography, anthropology, literary studies, science, sociology, economics, and development studies will be used to identify and analyze these complex contexts. Guest speakers will supplement the information offered in the course texts.

Catalog Description, WOMS 430: May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours as topic changes. PRQ: Junior or senior standing or consent of director. Catalog Description, WOMS 530: May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours as topic changes, but only 3 semester hours may be applied toward the certificate of graduate study in women’s studies.

Colette Morrow (3 credit hours)

  • Online with 3 face-to-face meetings at NIU-Naperville, Wednesdays, 09/12, 10/24, and 12/12, 6:30 – 9:15 pm.

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